Dirt stall wet floor - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 03-06-2020, 11:22 AM Thread Starter
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Dirt stall wet floor

The barn where I board has dirt floors (I think you'd call it a pole barn). Due to the elevation of the ground, the floor of Teddy's stall tends to get wet every time there is a strong rain event. This last time, I had just put a bunch of fresh shavings in. They are true shavings, dry and fluffy. They're still dry on top, but the floor of the stall, and some of the lower levels of shavings, are wet. Is it OK to leave it like this? It will dry out eventually, right? I only use their stalls for feeding and tacking, so they are in there maybe 3-5 hours per week.

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post #2 of 18 Old 03-06-2020, 11:35 AM
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Id be worried about shavings going moldy in warmer weather.

You could mix stall dry in with them to speed up the drying out process.

Can you raise the floor by bringing in some crushed stone and then putting rubber mats on top?
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post #3 of 18 Old 03-06-2020, 11:59 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
Id be worried about shavings going moldy in warmer weather.

You could mix stall dry in with them to speed up the drying out process.

Can you raise the floor by bringing in some crushed stone and then putting rubber mats on top?
If it were my barn, or if they spent significant time in there, I'd invest in something to keep it dry. But as it is, I'm honestly not really motivated. I thought about maybe trying to dig a trench to change the drainage pattern. I like the idea of roadfill too, if I really needed to fix it.

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post #4 of 18 Old 03-06-2020, 01:31 PM
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If the hooves are ridiculously dry, the moisture would be a fantastic balance...
If hooves though are prone to easily acquiring fungus infections, then no, not good and a no-go for me.

Yes, stalls will dry, over time...
But each time the wet/dry cycle comes, the ground will not ever dry as much/well, but become more saturated...
Be very cautious of what you save and the scents it can give off your horse will be inhaling let alone possibly skin infections if they lay down to rest on shavings now soaked from saturated ick...

So, if me...
Invest in a load of the cheapest fill material you can find..
A few yards delivered will raise a 12x12 stall several inches...then put stall mats on top.
Tractor Supply by me has the best prices when on sale and use the coupons from joining their "Neighbors Club" {free to join} for more savings.
Stall mats can go with you when you move and will give you many options at your new barn, stalls, wash stalls, grooming areas and aisle ways..
They are also great to put under a car that may have a oil leak so not to ruin concrete or asphalt.
Mats are a investment not a loss left behind.

I look at investing my sweat equity by raising the stall floor then adding a solid membrane {mat} so my horses feet are not standing in wet, soiled and possibly bacteria infused for hours at a time as proactive. Money well spent keeping hooves healthy so my horse stays sound with less chance of a hoof infection...
Speak to your barn owner about her supplying the material for your horse{s} stall if you would do the labor of placing the material inside...she just might do the financial end for you.
Most material does pack over time too so once you pulled "your" mats out, her base would be in better condition for the next boarder or her own horses.
...
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post #5 of 18 Old 03-06-2020, 02:15 PM Thread Starter
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The barn owner is super cheap and I can't imagine she'd be willing to pay for anything. I guess I will look into doing it myself, though. I'll price out some roadfill. Let's see, 10ft x 10ft x 6 inches. Ugh, I can't do math. Maybe that's 1-2 cubic yards? Even just cheapo fill dirt would work, I guess.

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post #6 of 18 Old 03-07-2020, 07:17 AM
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I would suggest checking your local Craigslist ...
Farm & Garden section, then type in the search bar "Fill Dirt"...
You would need a little less than 2 cubic yards per stall.
You have only 1 or several stalls needing done?.
Often a minimum amount needs delivered for prices quoted and within certain mileage from origination so do ask...

I only remember you are in Texas, but not location specific...
So I tried the "Houston" area as a search and had several offerings/listings show...
What you need to know and ask is how many yards per truck load for some of the prices listed as dump trucks come in many different dump body sizes...
The material is cheap, trucking is what can cost....

Lawn and Garden Shops also often have material and trucking available...
This project need not be expensive, even if you have more delivered than needed...
Does your Barn owner have a bucket loader tractor to help move the dirt for you if delivered and dumped not at your barn/stall...dirt is very heavy to move by wheelbarrow.
We have learned we never have enough dirt when needed...your barn owner may feel the same way and be willing to share the cost, even cheap as they are...sharing cost is a enticing appeal.
...
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post #7 of 18 Old 03-07-2020, 08:02 AM
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A big NO to fill dirt, cheap or otherwise as you will only accomplish compounding the problem:)

Do you have a pickup truck? If a gravel place is fairly close to where you board, get half to 3/4 ton of #2 base rock for starters.

Yes to raising a minimum of six inches. My NW stall is up 14Ē, while the NE stall is only up 8Ē. After all that, THEN you could trench around the barn on the side(s) where water tends to pool:)

I would top that with driveway gravel, then put mats on top of that:)

Keep your receipts for your mats, so when you do move, there is no question they belong to you:)

Now that I said all this, itís probably too muddy to back the truck up to the stall, so would a wheel barrow work or one of those 4-wheel carts TSC sells and carry it to the stall that way?

It would sure be labor intensive but once itís done, you would have a good place for Teddy to be in when he has to be in a stall:)

Hereís a link to help you figure how much you would likely need.

https://www.gravelshop.com/shop/calc...&productid=572

If the BO is ok with you spending the money, I would gravel the stall for the health of my horse:)
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post #8 of 18 Old 03-07-2020, 08:50 AM
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I would suggest a short term solution, and long term.

Short term would just add enough fill (or grade it with a shovel) to put the floor on a slope so it naturally drains. Then put stall mats over it. I bought the cheaper and thinner (trailer) mats from TSC on sale, because they are much easier to move around.

Long term adding crusher rock then mats, but would still keep it sloped for drainage.

Determining slope is a bit trickier, as you have to check the surrounding stalls and or aisleway for current height/slope. Best would be sloped down in back of stall, and a hole or two at the base to drain any water.

Some posters may strongly object to sloping the stalls, but sloping is the easiest and cheapest to do.

My stalls have a significant slope to them, because my barn is built on a hillside. The horses are fine. The stalls are 10x12 or 12x12 and horse can stand anyway that is comfortable to them.

Lacy stands at an angle facing the back corner (farthest from Chivas ) and Chivas always stands looking out the back door. Sassy generally lays down or stands sideways facing Chivas. Or she is picking up pieces of hay from the front corner.

The point being, the short time your horses are in the stalls, a slope doesn't matter.

IMO, putting a bunch of money into renovating the stall (6" deep will cost a LOT) is pointless.
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post #9 of 18 Old 03-07-2020, 08:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
Do you have a pickup truck? If a gravel place is fairly close to where you board, get half to 3/4 ton of #2 base rock for starters.

walkin...how big are the pieces of #2 base rock??


I live by a limestone quarry and here #2 is a very large road base material that is unsuitable for what she wants to do...
Limestone by me is graded in size and when I took a educational tour of the site I was surprised at how large their #2 graded was., baseball to softball sized chunks it was by me.
By me, crushed limestone is a mix of blend but smaller pieces she could easily handle with a shovel and get leveled in a stall...then mat and horse compact.


Hadn't thought about the dirt absorbing moisture again but raising inches above and matting would still present with the same issue?
Huh... no good then.


Craigslist still works though for finding what you do want to use and affordable with trucking costs in those estimate price given.

...

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post #10 of 18 Old 03-07-2020, 09:05 AM Thread Starter
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Living in Central Texas, we have a lot of crushed granite that you can buy. It's nice and soft and crunchy. Would that work? Size of pieces is anywhere between large grains of sand and maybe nickel sized.

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