Newfoundland snow storm - The Horse Forum
 60Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,240
• Horses: 2
Newfoundland snow storm

I'm not in Newfoundland. But I have experienced this kind of storm a few times. In 1992, I was visiting a friend in a nearby city and it snowed for 3 days, dumping 160 cms on the city. We could not leave the apartment for days. People had to tunnel their way out.

Parts of Newfoundland got 75 cms in about 24 hours. This is what that looks like. Imagine trying to get to the barn in this! (hint: you'll need snowshoes and a good shovel)

https://imgur.com/r/gifs/UYmCVwS?fbc...oPwDOoU-o3Jaeg
RegalCharm, AnitaAnne and SueC like this.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #2 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 01:57 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: eh?
Posts: 2,729
• Horses: 2
I couldn't remember where you were, if it was Nfl or Nb. Was wondering if you were caught in that.

I'll take -40 over 3ft of snow any day. At lease with the cold, when it's done it's gone. You still have to deal with the snow after the storm passes.
RegalCharm likes this.
ApuetsoT is offline  
post #3 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 01:59 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: A good place
Posts: 8,299
• Horses: 0
Blech. Not fun for anyone.
RegalCharm likes this.
boots is offline  
post #4 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 02:31 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,240
• Horses: 2
Meh, they're taking it in stride, mostly: https://www.bardown.com/people-in-ne...zard-1.1429738

Some folks love the snow!

I don't mind it (we got about 30 cms yesterday, so peanuts compared to this). Hubby gets out the tractor with 6 ft snowblower attachment and clears my paddock in a few minutes. The horses love being let out and realizing they don't have to wade through snow! Looking forward to riding in it soon. Snow has insulating qualities too, so it doesn't feel so cold.

The biggest problem is that a lot of people in Newfoundland were stuck inside their houses for three days. Roads are closed, emergency vehicles and plows couldn't run, and some even lost power (though again, the insulation of the snow is a blessing in that case). This is why we are told to keep an emergency kit for at least 3 days. I always have necessities on hand for such a scenario. But I feel for the elderly, sick, or anyone who has an emergency in the middle of this.
RegalCharm, SueC and Change like this.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #5 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 02:34 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: OK
Posts: 13,776
• Horses: 9
Where I grew up, the mountains of California, it wasn't unusual to get that kind of snow. And you'd better, BY GOD, not be late for work. Nothing was more frustrating than digging out my steps (house on a hillside) to the parking pad, clear the parking pad and then the snow plow would come by and dump a 4 ft berm in front of the carefully cleared area so that I had to start almost all over again. I have moved away from that kind of winter and am of the opinion, now, that unless the snow brings a chair lift with it, I never need to see any kind of accumulation again.

Dreamcatcher Arabians is offline  
post #6 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 02:45 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Carousel Capital
Posts: 1,649
• Horses: 2
Goodness, just watching that video makes me feel claustrophobic!



Fun to see the residents making the best out of the situation!
RegalCharm, SueC and Acadianartist like this.
Wild Heart is offline  
post #7 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 03:57 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 10,933
• Horses: 0
I want to know where the heck do you put what you shoveled...
You really can't throw it that high, so seriously....
Where does it go?

Really asking this question...the one above and the one below...

Do people have driveways that have de-icers, heating elements buried under the pavement to melt off that much accumulation?
I knew a family that lived on a very steep drive who did this otherwise the slightest moisture had them unable to drive up/down, walk up/down and "trapped" them top of the hill till the sun thawed the drive...then a repeat the next morning it was...
Once they installed that mechanism they never shoveled their driveway again.
I lived on Long Island so no mountain ranges and high elevation am I referring to....just crazy weather occurrences.
.....
RegalCharm likes this.

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is offline  
post #8 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 05:15 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,240
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
I want to know where the heck do you put what you shoveled...
You really can't throw it that high, so seriously....
Where does it go?

Really asking this question...the one above and the one below...

Do people have driveways that have de-icers, heating elements buried under the pavement to melt off that much accumulation?
I knew a family that lived on a very steep drive who did this otherwise the slightest moisture had them unable to drive up/down, walk up/down and "trapped" them top of the hill till the sun thawed the drive...then a repeat the next morning it was...
Once they installed that mechanism they never shoveled their driveway again.
I lived on Long Island so no mountain ranges and high elevation am I referring to....just crazy weather occurrences.
.....
Hahaha... so first off, the snow has to be hauled away. Snow blowers throw the snow high up in the air so that's not an issue (they can throw it right into a dump truck which dumps it in a designated area - like a dump for snow). But you're right, throwing snow over your head is no fun. Seriously, I have done it. It's HARD. You just throw it where you can. There are usually drifts, so there will be areas that have a little less and you pile it on there. People stuck inside their houses had to dig their way out from the inside so you shovel snow into buckets and either let it melt in your tub or throw it out a back door if you can get one open. It's tedious and not much fun. But it's not common to get this much snow this quickly.

They brought in the military to help dig out those who can't do it themselves. You can see photos of people shoveling over their heads in this article: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/cana...-of-emergency/

De-icers in pavement, driveways or roads haven't made their appearance in this part of the world. But just imagine melting that much snow off your driveway... it has to go somewhere. There are walls of snow on both sides of your driveway and the only way out is onto the street. That is water that will freeze as soon as it comes off the heated element. So you have a skating rink all around your house/at the edge of your driveway. Better to remove snow than ice because there's no way to remove that. Which is why I'd rather have snow than rain in the winter. Rain just freezes and makes a huge mess that cannot be removed.

When I was a teenager, I had a horse in my backyard and we had no power or water going to the barn. I'd have to haul buckets of water and hay to the barn, and after big storms, I'd go on snowshoes because no one cleared a path for me. Sometimes it's easier to just walk over it.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #9 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,240
• Horses: 2
After reading your post I remembered hearing that Montreal was looking into heated sidewalks: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montr...ject-1.3956703

Should be interesting to see how they deal with the melt water given that Montreal can get very large quantities of snow, but I suppose if you had a good heated drainage system in place it might work. Here, culverts are usually blocked with snow and ice and when we get a melt, the water has nowhere to go and creates bigger problems.

As for installing such a device in our driveway, I imagine the cost would be high and best installed while building rather than tear up a paved driveway and re-do it entirely. So for now, the vast majority of us will continue to shovel and blow the snow out of the way :)
Acadianartist is offline  
post #10 of 21 Old 01-20-2020, 06:32 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 971
• Horses: 0
When I was a kid one year we got snow up to our second story deck. My Dad dug us a sledding tunnel down from the deck that came out on the sidewalk below. He packed it all down and let it ice up and then we would sled down it and pretend we were bobsled racers going through a tunnel. It shot you out on the sidewalk at just the right angle so you would go racing down the iced up sidewalk for quite a long way. I have no idea what year it was I just remember we got a ton of use out of that tunnel before it started to melt in spring.

I also remember a day in winter later when i was in middle school where the temps dropped to -80F with the wind chill (probably -35F without as it was a windy day) and they were afraid kids would freeze to death at the bus stops so they cancelled school. We all went outside and played in the snow because there was nothing else to do. None of us froze to death so I guess their worries were pretty pointless.

Now that I am an adult and have to shovel it, and or plow it with the tractor I would prefer we not get weather like that but as a kid it was a blast.

Anything worth doing, is worth doing well.
AndyTheCornbread is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome