Barefoot horse- Hoof conformation- Lameness - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 27 Old 07-11-2017, 11:17 PM Thread Starter
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Barefoot horse- Hoof conformation- Lameness

Good Evening All!

My 5 yr old QH mare came lame after her most recent trim (2.5 weeks ago). I live just south of Houston and we have pretty wet and hot weather here. She is turned out 12-16 hours a day on pasture and is on minimal grain. She has been barefoot for approximately 2 years with no prior extended lameness issues.

We've been working on getting her hooves to a better conformation but her hooves are continuing to grow with her heels getting under-run and the hoof walls growing at a much faster pace than the rest of the foot. Now I'm noticing that she is separating at the white line and flaring. With her lameness continuing, I'm starting to think there are other changes happening and have schedule her to get x-rays on Thursday (soonest I could get them unfortunately). I know looking at pictures doesn't provide enough for a diagnosis, however any input would be much appreciated!

Here's the link to view the pictures: https://drive.google.com/drive/folde...TA?usp=sharing
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post #2 of 27 Old 07-11-2017, 11:23 PM
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This was just trimmed?
If it was, this lil lady still has a lot of hoof needing to be taken off. Her bars are so long they are laying down (painful) and her heels have not been addressed... at all.
Do you have access to another trimmer? I would fire your current one.
She is separating and flaring because she has too much hoof.

Before calling the vet for xrays, I'd try another, bit more competent, trimmer/farrier.
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post #3 of 27 Old 07-11-2017, 11:34 PM
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My unpredictable IPad couldn't open all the pictures but enough opened for me to say:

1. How long since the last trim?

2. Get a new farrier who actually knows what they are doing, have the horse trimmed every 4-5 weeks (five weeks maximum) and the wall separation, horribly under run heels, AND the lameness will likely all go away. Truthfully I'd be lame too, if I had to walk on those hooves:(

3. Please say you are not riding the horse with those hooves in that condition?

I am not one of the farriers on this forum but I have trimmed my own horses for years and live with an insulin resistant/foundered horse. That means I have enough knowledge to know you might want to fasten your seatbelt when the farrier's come in with their comments:)
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A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #4 of 27 Old 07-11-2017, 11:42 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for your input :)

To answer the questions so far:

- Time since last trim: 2.5 weeks. Her hooves do grow crazy fast down here (I'm not a new horse owner, but fairly new to having a horse in TX. I've had horses all my life in New England and never have I seen a horses hooves grow so fast (especially the wall) as I do with her

-I'm looking into options for farriers. Definitely hard to find a good one (as it is everywhere) but I'm definitely open to finding other farriers.

-I am not riding her with her hooves like this, believe me. Her hoof shape is changing horribly and I definitely do not want to do further damage.

I'll start shopping for another farrier
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post #5 of 27 Old 07-12-2017, 12:37 AM Thread Starter
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Meant to add, if anyone knows of a good farrier in the Houston area, please let me know (privately if needed). I know the ones I don't want to use and would love to hear of some good recommendations since the farrier directories have a slim selection showing.

Thanks!
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post #6 of 27 Old 07-12-2017, 12:48 AM
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I hope you can find someone:)

For those hooves to look like that and only 2-1/2 weeks into a trim ---- I would whap the farrier with his/her own rasp. Great Scott that is a horrible trim job, regardless of how fast her hooves are growing due to weather.

Had the hooves been correctly trimmed, the shape would still be there, even if there was a lot of growth showing.

Best of luck finding a decent farrier or trimmer. As you said, we all know what a nightmare that can be. Vets are not inclined to make such recommendations but I'll bet if you show those pictures you linked to this post, the vet will part with a couple names.

If your physically able, you might even consider learning how to trim yourself, if you can't find someone to do the job right:)

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #7 of 27 Old 07-12-2017, 04:01 AM
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I do not believe that this is 2 and a half weeks. There is HUGE amount of hoof to take off.
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post #8 of 27 Old 07-12-2017, 06:12 AM
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Hi,

Great pictures by the way! Sighting across the hoof & sole, and on an angle from heel to toe is also helpful, to get a better idea of depth. Pics of the hoof on the ground, squarely from side & front on, with the fetlock included, or even whole leg if there's some structural imbalance, will better show the whys & wherefores of hoof balance too.

Cherrij, you'd love to see some jobs I see in person around here then! I wish someone would hypnotise me to not look below the knees of horses I wasn't responsible for, because that looks like an A grade job compared to some newly trimmed ones... I've worked on horse properties when other farriers are also there & itched to be able to give those horses a GOOD trim when they're done! I am *guessing*(just because it fits the belief/trim of lots I've known) this is a farrier who believes in 'standing the horse up' & so is trying to make the horse grow higher heels, and who thinks horses should be peripherally loaded on their walls, so is afraid to trim the walls more, despite them being full of crud.

You don't say how long you've been in the hot, wet environment & how long this farrier has been tending the horse OP? Those things will both have a bearing on your horse and also on any judgement about the farrier.

Biggest thing I see is that the heels & bars have been allowed to overgrow significantly. The flares are likely happening because of that. And there appears a lot of 'seedy toe/WLD'. That needs cleaning up/cutting out too, as well as treating topically - if you're not, I'd start doing so, with a strong broad spectrum antiseptic. Without it(esp the toe crack) being cleaned out properly by a competent farrier, it will be hard/impossible for topical treatment to be really effective, but it will hopefully at least avoid it getting much worse in the meantime.

More specific info about the horse's management, diet, lameness, etc would help give the whole picture. Is she ridden bare or booted? What sort of riding? How is she managed/kept? Has she been paddock lame since the farrier or only when worked or on hard ground or such? Her soles do look likely thin, and the separation & crack could potentially be causing pain, if it's infected/damaged into live tissue.
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post #9 of 27 Old 07-12-2017, 09:45 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Hi,

Great pictures by the way! Sighting across the hoof & sole, and on an angle from heel to toe is also helpful, to get a better idea of depth. Pics of the hoof on the ground, squarely from side & front on, with the fetlock included, or even whole leg if there's some structural imbalance, will better show the whys & wherefores of hoof balance too.

Cherrij, you'd love to see some jobs I see in person around here then! I wish someone would hypnotise me to not look below the knees of horses I wasn't responsible for, because that looks like an A grade job compared to some newly trimmed ones... I've worked on horse properties when other farriers are also there & itched to be able to give those horses a GOOD trim when they're done! I am *guessing*(just because it fits the belief/trim of lots I've known) this is a farrier who believes in 'standing the horse up' & so is trying to make the horse grow higher heels, and who thinks horses should be peripherally loaded on their walls, so is afraid to trim the walls more, despite them being full of crud.

You don't say how long you've been in the hot, wet environment & how long this farrier has been tending the horse OP? Those things will both have a bearing on your horse and also on any judgement about the farrier.

Biggest thing I see is that the heels & bars have been allowed to overgrow significantly. The flares are likely happening because of that. And there appears a lot of 'seedy toe/WLD'. That needs cleaning up/cutting out too, as well as treating topically - if you're not, I'd start doing so, with a strong broad spectrum antiseptic. Without it(esp the toe crack) being cleaned out properly by a competent farrier, it will be hard/impossible for topical treatment to be really effective, but it will hopefully at least avoid it getting much worse in the meantime.

More specific info about the horse's management, diet, lameness, etc would help give the whole picture. Is she ridden bare or booted? What sort of riding? How is she managed/kept? Has she been paddock lame since the farrier or only when worked or on hard ground or such? Her soles do look likely thin, and the separation & crack could potentially be causing pain, if it's infected/damaged into live tissue.
Hi there!

Thank you for complementing my photos. I can get some more if needed too. I've been down in Texas for about two years now, with this horse being here about the same time. She was bought and transported from Pennsylvania, which is a much different environment for sure. When she came down here, her hooves were pretty much the same as they are right now (under run, tons of wall, sitting back on heels). I've gone through three farriers now to try to get her hooves to a somewhat "normal" conformation. I have used this farrier two times now, since our last farrier couldn't (or wouldn't) show up to do the trims. I took a farrier course when I was in college (about 12 years ago), but I'm not confident (at all) in trimming my horses at this time.

As for how she is kept, she is typically ridden barefoot. She is currently being ridden/ trained for reining and is stalled at night with grass turnout all day. She's been paddock lame since the farrier and this lameness has come and gone for the past two weeks. Her soles are thin and I've been treating her with Durasole to try to get them to callous up. I am worried about the crack and separation of the wall as I know little stones are getting in there and every day I'm cleaning it out extensively to try to keep any infection from starting/spreading.

It's frustrating trying to get her hooves on track, especially when we have a lack of "good" farriers here.
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post #10 of 27 Old 07-12-2017, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
I hope you can find someone:)

For those hooves to look like that and only 2-1/2 weeks into a trim ---- I would whap the farrier with his/her own rasp. Great Scott that is a horrible trim job, regardless of how fast her hooves are growing due to weather.

Had the hooves been correctly trimmed, the shape would still be there, even if there was a lot of growth showing.

Best of luck finding a decent farrier or trimmer. As you said, we all know what a nightmare that can be. Vets are not inclined to make such recommendations but I'll bet if you show those pictures you linked to this post, the vet will part with a couple names.

If your physically able, you might even consider learning how to trim yourself, if you can't find someone to do the job right:)
It definitely is a nightmare finding someone that's good, especially down here. I've been through 3 farriers so far and most of them are just horrible about being professional. They either don't show up or show up 3 hours late (or early in some cases).

I've thought about taking another farrier course as I did it in college (12 or so years ago). I'm not confident in trimming my horses hooves, however because I've become extremely rusty with proper trim techniques (as exhibited in this post...). I am going to take a look at the options however. I really am getting tired of shopping for farriers.
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