Canker? Or what’s going on? - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 75 Old 11-25-2019, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by WildestDandelion View Post
I could be wrong but I feel that it is not environmental since he already had thrush when we got him. He did not receive any hay in my care until just a few week ago. He was on full pasture until then, receiving alfalfa cubes and nutrena senior pellets for several months until we got his weight up. We don't have mud, but we do have very loamy soil that tends to hold moisture quite a bit.
Environmental nutrient levels (such as soil analysis in a province or even several provinces) are reflected in not only the hay, but also grass and even water (which is why we need filters). Even, the red mineral blocks contribute to iron intake. Just to give you an example, I live in Canada and several provinces here have very high iron in the soil, thus to get adequate copper absorption, we have to give little to none iron and high copper supplementation. They are already getting enough iron from the hay, water etc. Nutrients can also be out of balance in feed and alfalfa has its own nutrient quantities- high calcium, which again would interfere with manganese, phosphorus, copper, and zinc, if not balanced properly. Iron also doesn't rid easily in horses, unless they bleed, so can accumulate. So, it is still highly possible that your horse is not absorbing enough copper.

Although, I'm not saying that nutrient balance is 100% the cause of your horse's thrush. There are several factors that can contribute to that issue, including nutrition. So, treatment is best when multidimensional, in order to cover all basis. Ensuring your horse's nutrition is balanced is one part of long-term maintenance to help prevent future thrush infections and provide nutrients for quality hoof growth.
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post #32 of 75 Old 11-25-2019, 07:35 PM
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Am I the only one that thinks the toes look too long? My trimmer recommends FungiDye for thrush. She says it kills the thrush without damaging the living tissue.
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post #33 of 75 Old 11-26-2019, 02:31 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DanisMom View Post
Am I the only one that thinks the toes look too long? My trimmer recommends FungiDye for thrush. She says it kills the thrush without damaging the living tissue.
His toes are run forward and his heels are run under. Especially in the back. His front feet have made more progress in that.
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post #34 of 75 Old 11-26-2019, 02:33 PM
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His long toes and under-run heels are contributing to the problem, plus the WLD. I think anything done until that is corrected is merely a stop-gap measure.
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post #35 of 75 Old 11-26-2019, 02:34 PM Thread Starter
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UPDATE:

Red started showing signs of soreness so farrier is coming back out tomorrow and packing him with Magic Cushion. I've been cleaning his feet daily, soaking again today. It's been dry but is supposed to rain again thursday and friday :(
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post #36 of 75 Old 11-26-2019, 02:36 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
His long toes and under-run heels are contributing to the problem, plus the WLD. I think anything done until that is corrected is merely a stop-gap measure.
It's definitely been a fustercluck. His heels were horribly contracted when we got him, those are also improving, but one is still pretty bad and the thrush in the central sulcus there is BAD.
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post #37 of 75 Old 11-26-2019, 03:14 PM
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In the photos, your farrier shortened everything, but has made little to no attempt to get the toes brought back. That, more than anything, will help this horse by improving breakover, allowing the heels more freedom to open up, and hopefully addressing the WLD before it gets worse to where resection is the only option. Loosie's diagrams earlier are correct. It's really hard to fix contracted heels, etc. without the toe being back where it should be. How long has this farrier been working on your horse? Toes can be brought back pretty drastically within 2-3 trim cycles for most horses, especially if radiographs are taken first so they know just how far they can go at first. I would be rather upset if my horses' toes were this long with a fresh trim...
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post #38 of 75 Old 11-26-2019, 03:22 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
In the photos, your farrier shortened everything, but has made little to no attempt to get the toes brought back. That, more than anything, will help this horse by improving breakover, allowing the heels more freedom to open up, and hopefully addressing the WLD before it gets worse to where resection is the only option. Loosie's diagrams earlier are correct. It's really hard to fix contracted heels, etc. without the toe being back where it should be. How long has this farrier been working on your horse? Toes can be brought back pretty drastically within 2-3 trim cycles for most horses, especially if radiographs are taken first so they know just how far they can go at first. I would be rather upset if my horses' toes were this long with a fresh trim...
This last trim cycle was the 4th trim. I will bring this to her attention. Any advice for a respectful way to bring this up without offending?
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post #39 of 75 Old 11-26-2019, 03:39 PM
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"I'm concerned my horse's toes are still so long. I'd like to see us start bringing those toes back, especially with the evidence of WLD. Can we take a little off today? If not, I'd really like to see progress in that direction with our next trim."

Hopefully she's open to the idea, and that someone on her farrier forum also mentioned it If she disagrees, find out why and get a timeline for when those toes can start coming back. Long toes strain the whole leg, and a strained leg cannot have a truly healthy hoof. If you feel she just won't do it, you may need to find a farrier who will work in that direction.
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post #40 of 75 Old 11-26-2019, 03:44 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you! I tend to sound too aggressive so that’s truly helpful lol.

Are the front ones still too long as well? Because i thought they were looking pretty good
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