Cracking hooves - The Horse Forum
 23Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 22 Old 07-16-2020, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 29
• Horses: 1
Cracking hooves

Hello,
I will try to keep this short. My horse who normally has great hooves now has what I feel are really bad feet. They have lots of cracks so we are trimming her every four weeks. The only two things that I can think of have changed is that for the past two years for summer she has gone on a mainly grass diet (custom minerals and beer pulp but no hay). Prior to that she had access to short grass but really ate hay all summer. This really started at the end of last summer - and it’s been a battle ever since. A while back she had a selinium deficiency (a full mineral, selinium, vitamin e panel was done). Now she is on a custom mineral built based off of the hay/grass analysis. I also had her on an omega oil until 2 years ago and I found she always looked awesome while on that (pretty much the whole time I owned her until then) Thoughts?

Also she has a weird curve in her front right hoof as of this week (or at least I just noticed it) wondering what might be causing that.

The weather has been all over the place - but I think there is something more to it - or I at least want to try and figure out if there is a cause other than the weather.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DD1E3878-7FA1-4890-A735-F2204DF09F9F_1594910542149.jpg (34.0 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg BCF49986-710E-4CC5-A3DD-F4D6E9BA2101_1594910560397.jpg (51.3 KB, 8 views)
short stuff is offline  
post #2 of 22 Old 07-16-2020, 07:09 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,687
• Horses: 2
My older gelding's hooves get like this every summer when things dry out. Can't say I have much of an answer for you though, but I empathize. He is also on a balanced diet with Camelina oil, selenium, and everything else his equine nutritionist thinks he needs. We are also trimming every four weeks. I would say he's always been like this in the heat of the summer (he is ridden on sand/hard dirt), but it seems to be getting worse as he gets older.

He also tends to get a bit sore, so my trimmer suggested a coat of hoof armour. I don't want to shoe if I can help it, and we got him boots last summer, but the fit tends to change during his trim cycle, and they just feel clunky at times. I'm told the hoof armour can go on the sole as well as the hoof wall and just helps protect the entire hoof. I am going to learn to apply it myself (my trimmer is coming out to help me the first time) and I'll just re-apply after each trim. It's supposed to stay on for several weeks. I'll let you know if I have success with that.

Curious to hear what others think.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #3 of 22 Old 07-17-2020, 04:07 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 21,989
• Horses: 0
Hi,

While the side-on pics are a little skewed so can't be precise, they look OK to me trim-wise, although heels could be a little high. Front-on pic shows her quarters are rather flared. But appears to me there's no burning mechanical reason for cracks or such. See link in my signature for what's needed for critique pics if you want that.

These cracks, being rather 'superficial' looking, I agree look diet/nutrition related to me. Along with correctly balanced mins, omega 3 & other essential fatties such as lysine may be what's needed.
Acadianartist likes this.
loosie is offline  
post #4 of 22 Old 07-17-2020, 05:11 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Northern Florida
Posts: 5,155
• Horses: 4
My horses hooves have gotten like that in the past. Seems to me that it happened when they were standing in a lot of water and then dried out off and on with that cycle. I live in florida and it rains almost every evening in the summer. The flares could be from the same thing as the feet want to pancake out if wet a lot. Trimming a little differently could help but I'm not an expert on how to trim them.
loosie and Acadianartist like this.

There will be only one of you for all time. Fearlessly be yourself.
Coffee is my spirit animal
LoriF is offline  
post #5 of 22 Old 07-17-2020, 08:42 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 55
• Horses: 0
You might also feed Biotin. Helped my horse a lot.
Haffytrailstoyou is offline  
post #6 of 22 Old 07-17-2020, 06:36 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 21,989
• Horses: 0
^Biotin may well be needed, but I'm betting that if the horse is getting ample green pick, he's getting ample biotin, and as OP has had a diet analysis done, hopefully it should have already been considered if the horse were lacking.

Biotin is but one of many nutrients which may be lacking, but is often not. They did studies on it & effects on hooves of feeding it to some Spanish Riding School horses & found it helped hooves grow faster(but not stronger) in those horses. As a result of having 'a study that shows...' on it, they have marketed it around the world very successfully as 'the hoof nutrient'...
Acadianartist likes this.
loosie is offline  
post #7 of 22 Old 07-25-2020, 08:08 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 29
• Horses: 1
Sorry for the delay in responding - my make has now been on and off lame. We put front shoes on her and that seemed to help, but then she seemed possibly off on her left hind. Vet is coming out Tuesday and my trainer has seen her.

Would you be worried about lamanitis/founder? I took a bunch of photos before the shoe was put on her front hoof. I’m getting her tested for IR as well when the vet is out.

Here are the photos.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 501D31A6-B282-43EB-BC86-508D601F6B8A_1595721905708.jpg (79.0 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg 307D4D43-DF8A-4C08-A666-5F01ECD6862D_1595721930679.jpg (43.6 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg 828F6268-61FC-4184-8458-A68E6AC206F8_1595721954140.jpg (35.3 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg 0ACD4699-900B-4DDB-8EB3-9531D40DE449_1595721981473.jpg (46.1 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg 1932D95A-76D2-4054-AC88-DAACC48767E0_1595722006289.jpg (39.6 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg 693587F4-F6E5-4118-98E5-DF9D11E7B237_1595722084500.jpg (85.8 KB, 5 views)
short stuff is offline  
post #8 of 22 Old 07-25-2020, 10:08 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 9,178
• Horses: 0
1. She has pretty hooves. Yes she could be laminitic; on again/off again lameness is a good sign:(

Seeing how nice her hooves are, I would not have put shoes on her until the vet sees her:)

My foundered horse has orthotic shoes, lily pads and he is back to having equithane applied but his issues are far more critical and he reached a point where hoof boots were not working for him.

2. Call the vet Monday and ask if he/she can bring a portable x-ray. It would be the best thing to see what’s going on inside the hooves before deciding how to manage them:)

Since a hind hoof may now be sore, get the hinds x-rayed if you can afford it, so you have a baseline.

3. Yes to testing for IR. Did the vet tell you she cannot eat anything but hay and water after 10:00 PM and nothing but hay and water in the morning until AFTER he draws the blood.

3.1. Also, if you can afford to, have the vet draw a second vile of blood to perform the ACTH test for Cushings, aka PPID. Might as well get a baseline on that issue too, even if she has zero indicators:)

4. Back to the shoes - what did the farrier put on her? You will hate us to ask for pictures, lol
loosie and JoBlueQuarter like this.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
walkinthewalk is online now  
post #9 of 22 Old 07-26-2020, 05:23 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 21,989
• Horses: 0
Hi, yes, I'd be concerned about laminitis, if she's been on/off lame & on multiple feet. With further pics, you can see there are some issues, but not at all what I'd consider major ones, so no need for 'panic stations' and IF it is laminitis, with good management you should be able to head off any further probs.

I gather you shod her to try to make her comfortable? While shoes are indeed a commonly effective palliative, I do not think that is a good idea at all, if we're talking conventional peripheral loading rims. Rigid steel rims which put the whole load onto the walls, are potentially problematic for a number of reasons, but especially on unhealthy hooves, of a horse who may be suffering bouts of laminitis, peripheral loading rims can cause some serious repercussions. So I'd first & foremost, get the shoes off her, and if she is not comfortable even on soft footing, then I'd pad her feet - you can just use closed cell foam & duct tape as an emergency, or you can use actual hoof boots. Of course, I appreciate that I'm just an anonymous voice saying this & would not want you to take my word for it, but I do urge you to look into these matters further. barehoofcare.com is one good source of info - despite the name, from a Master Farrier who is not adverse to the occasional set of conventional shoes(just saying so you know he's not a 'barefoot fanatic').

So, as said, hooves don't show anything major, but I've marked a couple of your pics to show what I do see as problematic. As said, the quarter flares are quite major, but the stretched toe doesn't look too bad. It concerns me that it appears that it's almost the whole height of the hoof capsule though. I drew on your pics. Side view shows the green line where, just following the plane of the top of the capsule & looking at what's above the capsule, heel height etc, I imagine the dorsal wall 'should' be. Also approx where heel should be & how high - it's a little high & a little forward.

The sole pic, you can see the wall appears to be separated all round(hope at least the shoes weren't fit to the foot in that shape). Pic appears to be not quite squarely taken, and with the hoof not freshly cleaned out, can't be exact, but I've marked approx where the heels should be, where the 'breakover' should be(those can be worked out with ELPO guidelines), and pointed out that the bars are overlong, have run over the sole.

**Again, these are not major issues and the hoof looks pretty reasonable otherwise, but considering lameness as well, pointing out everything I see, for you to consider.

Oh & I wouldn't personally get too excited about IR testing. 'IR' is not a 'disease', but a *natural body function* resulting from too much/chronic 'good paddock' so to speak. While some genetics are more sensitive to others, ALL horses are 'prone' to it, just like all people are, if they live on junk food etc. Therefore, I think it's prudent to just treat all horses as if they're IR or 'at risk' of it.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 693587F4-F6E5-4118-98E5-DF9D11E7B237_1595722084500.jpg (280.2 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg 307D4D43-DF8A-4C08-A666-5F01ECD6862D_1595721930679.jpg (171.0 KB, 28 views)
Jolly101 likes this.
loosie is offline  
post #10 of 22 Old 07-26-2020, 06:44 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,687
• Horses: 2
This is the product I have applied to my gelding's hooves: https://hoofarmor.com/

With my hoof guru's help, I've done an initial application and already, Harley seems less ouchy. My trimmer suggested I apply a coat each week for four weeks, then just apply it after each trim. It's really not hard to do, and at 85$ for a starter kit that should do several applications, not very expensive either. The product contains antimicrobial ingredients to help keep away undesirable bacteria from any cracks or other defects in the hoof. While I cannot speak to its effectiveness yet, since it is too early on in our journey, my hoof guru (she used to trim my horses but has since retired) has found she no longer has to boot one of her horses since using it.
Acadianartist is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome