Feet Still Sore - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 01:53 PM Thread Starter
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Feet Still Sore

Pony got trimmed Monday and when I rode him today he still seemed sore. He didn't want to walk, although he was OK at the trot. I asked the instructor what she thought, and she thought he seemed sore on his hind end (on the bright side, he apparently was really getting his back feet under him when he trotted), but she didnít think he was trimmed too short. I had the barn owner watch me ride him as well, and she thought he was just generally sore. She said a lot of the horses have had to have back shoes added right now because the ground is so hard.

I rode him on the grass and he felt a lot better than in the (sand) arena.

What Iím wondering is, if itís true that he was using his back legs differently AND he was sore, does that mean the trimmer changed his angles? Itís one thing for me to ask her to not trim them so short next time, but if sheís changing the angles I donít know what to do.

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post #2 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 04:26 PM
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I think it could mean different things.

If he's sore, he could be using his body differently to compensate, without angles being changed at all. That could make him sore in other areas.


Can I make a recommendation? After each trim take a couple photos, they don't have to be great, or for critique or anything, but that way you have a reference through time to see changes.


One of my horses can get a little tender and I put him on a supplement that helped within a few days. He was fine in deep footing but would get a little sore on harder footing. It's called remission by animed. I'm not saying it's necessarily right for this situation but might be worth researching more.
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post #3 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
I rode him on the grass and he felt a lot better than in the (sand) arena.
If change in footing causes change in way of going/comfort then this generally indicates it is foot pain causing the issue. But could be that deep sand & whatever you were asking of him was causing soreness because of body issues or some such.

Quote:
What Iím wondering is, if itís true that he was using his back legs differently AND he was sore, does that mean the trimmer changed his angles?
No. She might have changed angles for some reason - you should know that, we can't see the horse & the current/old angle - but with only this info you have given, it is *possible* that the reason he was sore was due to significant change in hoof angle, but... who knows?? But if that were the case, unlikely he would be more sore on soft, yielding footing like sand.
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post #4 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 07:49 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
If change in footing causes change in way of going/comfort then this generally indicates it is foot pain causing the issue. But could be that deep sand & whatever you were asking of him was causing soreness because of body issues or some such.



No. She might have changed angles for some reason - you should know that, we can't see the horse & the current/old angle - but with only this info you have given, it is *possible* that the reason he was sore was due to significant change in hoof angle, but... who knows?? But if that were the case, unlikely he would be more sore on soft, yielding footing like sand.
That's good to know. I will just remind her next time to not trim so short then.
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post #5 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 08:07 PM
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What is trimming short?? I don't understand.


Gene Ovnicek recommends trimming to around 1/8" above the live sole. So how would trimming short relate to that? Does it involve trimming away some live sole adjacent to the hoof capsule?


Fill me in please.

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post #6 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 08:13 PM Thread Starter
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The new trimmer cuts off more hoof wall relative to the outside of the sole.

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post #7 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 08:17 PM
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If the horse were standing on a perfectly smooth surface do you mean only the sole would be touching? That the hoof wall would be not touching?


I think I'm not understanding 'relative to the outside of the sole'. Outside as in the solar surface or outside as in adjacent to the hoof wall.


I'm trying......really.

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post #8 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
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I believe that solar surface is the right phrase. I don't have my hoof book handy. I mean the part of the sole that touches the ground. Equivalent to the sole of your foot.

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post #9 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 08:25 PM
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Yes, the part that touches the ground is solar surface.


So does he actually cut the hoof wall where it is above the solar surface when standing, or just shorter than usual? If the horse were standing on that perfectly flat smooth surface, would the solar surface be touching? If not, how high above said surface.


I'm wanting to know this because your horse should not be tender.

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post #10 of 46 Old 08-08-2020, 08:31 PM
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I went back and reread some stuff. Being sore in sand but not on more firm stuff just doesn't compute. Sand takes more muscle but not more hoof. Sand is normally good for a sore footed horse. Even if the angles are wrong, the horse can put the angles where they feel the best.


Strange.

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