Frog Separation in Hoof - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 11:28 AM Thread Starter
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Hi,
I have a 2 yr old warmblood who developed an abscess in a hind foot while on stall rest that blew out the back of the heel bulbs (Approx 4 weeks ago). As a result, this created a frog separation in the back of the heel. She was on SMZs for 10 days along with betadine soaks and the area is clean, dry and has some new growth. It took about 1 week for the abscess to drain and has been 3 weeks since that point. The existing frog will eventually need to be removed but we elected to leave it for as long as we could so that there was a natural band aid to protect the new growth underneath. She is still not 100% sound on the foot though is significantly more comfortable than what she had been. It is my understanding it could be this way for a period of time with regards to slight yet noticeable lameness until the old frog is removed and the new grows in and toughens up. She is on farriers formula daily to supplement and we use products such as farriers fix, durasole and magic cushion as needed to help.

Has anyone else dealt with this? Any insight on what was the timeline was like until full regrowth and sound again?
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post #2 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 01:10 PM
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post #3 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 01:39 PM
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Order some Tomorrow dry cow mastitis treatment to squirt up in there. It will keep new or existing infection out while she grows new heel.
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post #4 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 01:57 PM
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Been there about 2 years ago. Started with 2 small holes in the heel bulbs and then went to the same "look" very quickly. Like you, I decided to keep the loose layer on, as long as it remained well attached. I squirted tomorrow in there (as @TeeZee recommended) after making sure there was no dirt packed in, but then switched to Pete's Goo (a mixture of triple antibiotic ointment and athlete's foot cream) - worked like a charm. No new infection and the new frog was growing in very nicely... Took maybe a month or 2 (don't remember that well how long it took) for the old part to be pushed off (and cut away)...
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post #5 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 02:14 PM
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I'd do like TeeZee said use the tomorrow cow medicine. Don't think I'd be putting Durasole on that it is to harsh for tender new growth. Keep it clean and protected with a wrap or hoof boot and pad.
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post #6 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 04:55 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the feedback! With regards to your experience, did your horse have a slight lameness consistent throughout the process until the new frog was grown in and heel grown out a bit?
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post #7 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 04:56 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwissMiss View Post
Been there about 2 years ago. Started with 2 small holes in the heel bulbs and then went to the same "look" very quickly. Like you, I decided to keep the loose layer on, as long as it remained well attached. I squirted tomorrow in there (as @TeeZee recommended) after making sure there was no dirt packed in, but then switched to Pete's Goo (a mixture of triple antibiotic ointment and athlete's foot cream) - worked like a charm. No new infection and the new frog was growing in very nicely... Took maybe a month or 2 (don't remember that well how long it took) for the old part to be pushed off (and cut away)...
Thank you for the feedback! With regards to your experience, did your horse have a slight lameness consistent throughout the process until the new frog was grown in and heel grown out a bit?
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post #8 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 05:09 PM
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Save yourself some money. Get some tea tree oil (you can usually find it in the hair/scalp treatment section of a store). Get some gauze or cotton balls. Clean out the cavity. Squirt in enough plane white vinegar (of a 50/50 mix with water) to rinse the area well (both makes it cleaner and kills any thrush that's looking for a home). Soak the cotton or gauze with the tea tree oil and pack it into the cavity. Remove the gauze or cotton every 3 or 4 days and repeat the process. Should heal up nicely in a few weeks without any infections.

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
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post #9 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pauldda View Post
Thank you for the feedback! With regards to your experience, did your horse have a slight lameness consistent throughout the process until the new frog was grown in and heel grown out a bit?
My mare was never lame. But I kept her on soft/yielding ground (aka pasture) the whole time...
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post #10 of 10 Old 09-20-2019, 06:06 PM
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Nice job keeping the frog on there! That's really smart (that's sincere, not sarcastic. =). However, there are two outcomes to leaving excess frog. You'll especially want to be aware of them because your horse had an abscess blow out at the heel:

1) The old, extra frog tissue there, acting as a pad, should encourage the new frog to grow in. Once the new frog does start to grow in, the extra 'compression' it gets (via the old frog material) might help it gain density and quality until such time that you (or your farrier) deems it appropriate to trim out the old frog, or the old frog is ready to shed out.

OR 2) The old, extra frog tissue there, acting as a pad, starts to cause excess pressure and soreness as the new frog grows in. YOU DO NOT WANT THIS. You want to stay away from anything that might cause another abscess, obviously, but there's another issue with the hoof being generally sore...particularly if the soreness is in the heel. Horses that have been heel-sore sometimes get the idea that they can tiptoe around and not use a heel-first impact. (Why would you do something that hurts?) This tip-toeing around DOES start undesirable hoof growth patterns - more wearing of the hoof at the toe, and that can lead to an inability to 'grow' hoof wall at the toe, and can (down the road) lead to founder. So prevent heel soreness at all costs. Don't be shy about shaving thin layers off of the shedding frog, when appropriate. If you use a farrier, be sure to discuss this.

Furthermore, one good thing to do (to check on proper hoof growth) is to measure collateral grooves at the heel and apex of the frog, both sides. Here's how to do that and some tools (other than the lollipop stick) that can help:
How to: Measuring Collateral Grooves - The Laminitis Site
Tool that I'll likely be getting: JH Forge - Hoof Evaluator
Tool that I own but had to customize (it was too thick to fit in the collateral groove): https://www.precisionhoofpickusa.com/

Sometimes 1" depth at the heel and 3/4" at the toe are appropriate, particularly if you have a bigger horse. Given that you're working with a 2yr old warmblood, the 3/4" depth would sounds appropriate. If you feel he needs more heel in order to prevent soreness, don't be bashful about leaving up to 1/4" wall above the sole plane - just make sure you leave that much all the way around.

If your horse is showing signs of lameness, it might be excess frog pressure OR it could be that some infection got deeper in there than you suspected. Soaking for about 5 minutes with 'white lightning' treatment can help ensure hoof health, and it's safe on frog tissue. Triodine is a frog-safe disinfectant you can use to squirt in there, and it's a mild antifungal/antibacterial mix of iodine that 'sticks' very well to hoof tissue. (Triodine stains, watch yourself.) I, too, love 'Pete's Goo' to prevent infections and thrush.

Note about farrier's formula: it contains iron, and horses are tending to have too much iron in their diet rather than too little. Too much iron (and mineral imbalance in general) can be a culprit of hoof problems, and can encourage thrush (one indicator of high iron). Proper protein (amino acids) and mineral balance are food for hooves.

No diet, no hoof. No hoof, no horse. No horse is not an option!
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