Healthy Hoof? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 4 Old 07-11-2020, 02:17 AM Thread Starter
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Healthy Hoof?

Apart from being dry (we live in the desert), do you hoof-smart folks see anything of concern here? It looks a little like the wall might be separating? He was a tad thrushy, which had him a bit ouchy for a few days, but as usual some thrush-buster cleared that up pretty quickly. But my Mother pointed out that there seems to be a possible look of early signs of separation?
We decided with this last appointment that we are getting a new farrier and haven't found a new one yet so there's no point in asking our last one (I didn't feel like I trust his knowledge much...).
He was trimmed about 1.5 weeks ago.
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post #2 of 4 Old 07-11-2020, 08:08 AM
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I am not as experienced as some people but here are my opinions:

For a hoof critique, it would be best to have several different angles. (Good Hoof Photos - How to take Good Hoof Photos)

While hooves are supposed to be dry, his hooves look too dry. Although this can be common for horses who live in dry, desert conditions, it is not good for them. What are you feeding him? Good nutrition will help with dry hooves. Do his hooves have access to a water source, such as a pond? When the horse goes to drink or play, his hooves soak in in the moisture. Some people apply topical hoof conditioners, but good hooves start from the inside and work their way out.

There is flare. This is contributing to his white line stretching.

His hooves look flat.

His hoof looks to be stretched forward; too long. From my understanding, this can be caused by under-run heels, too long heels, too low heels, or too long toes. His heels look to be contracted and his frog looks to be stretched. The heels and frog are supposed to be strong, thick, and wide to help support the horse's weight during loading. This overall stretching pulls the breakover forward, which can stress the hoof and cause tripping. His hooves look to be "sharp." I like for horses' hooves to have some roll/bevel around the wall and scoop quarters to help wear and flexion. While some horses have naturally more oval-shaped forehooves, it is good that you are reconsidering how this horse is trimmed.

Here are some articles that I recommend reading:
http://hoofrehab.com/
https://www.help4hooves.com/trimming-principles
http://www.barefoothorse.com/barefoot_HoofShape.html
http://www.ironfreehoof.com/
http://www.all-natural-horse-care.co...Education.html
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post #3 of 4 Old 07-12-2020, 02:07 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoGo5 View Post
I am not as experienced as some people but here are my opinions:

For a hoof critique, it would be best to have several different angles. (Good Hoof Photos - How to take Good Hoof Photos)

While hooves are supposed to be dry, his hooves look too dry. Although this can be common for horses who live in dry, desert conditions, it is not good for them. What are you feeding him? Good nutrition will help with dry hooves. Do his hooves have access to a water source, such as a pond? When the horse goes to drink or play, his hooves soak in in the moisture. Some people apply topical hoof conditioners, but good hooves start from the inside and work their way out.

There is flare. This is contributing to his white line stretching.

His hooves look flat.

His hoof looks to be stretched forward; too long. From my understanding, this can be caused by under-run heels, too long heels, too low heels, or too long toes. His heels look to be contracted and his frog looks to be stretched. The heels and frog are supposed to be strong, thick, and wide to help support the horse's weight during loading. This overall stretching pulls the breakover forward, which can stress the hoof and cause tripping. His hooves look to be "sharp." I like for horses' hooves to have some roll/bevel around the wall and scoop quarters to help wear and flexion. While some horses have naturally more oval-shaped forehooves, it is good that you are reconsidering how this horse is trimmed.

Here are some articles that I recommend reading:
http://hoofrehab.com/
https://www.help4hooves.com/trimming-principles
http://www.barefoothorse.com/barefoot_HoofShape.html
http://www.ironfreehoof.com/
http://www.all-natural-horse-care.co...Education.html
Wonderful, I will look into all this.

He is getting alfalfa as his staple, but I just started him the other day on Renew Gold Supplement and added some chopped Teff to replace what we cut back a little on the alfalfa.

Thank you!
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post #4 of 4 Old 07-13-2020, 07:05 PM
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Agree a lot with what gogo said, but do not believe it's at all obvious hooves are 'too dry' or that that is a common issue or hoof conditioner is helpful. I also don't believe frog looks stretched - that only tends to happen W chronic founder. It does however look overtrimmed(tho if thrushy, poss necessary) & a bit weak.

Overall, hoof looks ok I reckon, tho agree again it's a bit 'run forward's in toes & may be a bit flared all round(other angle pics will better tell). Heels could be a bit high, but need diff angles to be sure & how much, etc.

Looks like there is a fair bit of sole ready to exfoliate, which would leave walls overlong. Generally I don't remove this until it's ready to come away easily but it does depend.
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