Hoof crack care and supplements - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 11:55 AM Thread Starter
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He is also currently out 24/7 no matter the weather. At my place he will be stalled at night
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post #12 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 11:59 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
Our resident farriers and trimmers must be out catching up on trims during this brief period of warmth we are having. Hopefully they will come in and comment

If that is two vertical cracks (about 1 to 1-1/2 inches apart) I am seeing on the right front, I'm not buying those can't eventually be made to disappear. Unless the horse suffered a really bad laceration to the hoof or above it, that will prevent it from closing.

My 18 yo TWH lives with a ridge on his hoof from a life-threatening injury he received in his youth, before I bought him.

Here comes the standard two questions - lol

1. Details of his diet, including amounts and don't forget the hay

2. Is it possible to have someone help you get close up pictures not only of the tops of the hooves in question but the soles?

If you don't have a barn or a shed, shovel a level spot big enough to where you can put the camera on the ground and still have it level with the hooves.

Take front, sides, and directly behind the hooves so the heels can be clearly seen.

Don't wash his hooves, as wet hooves skewe the issues in pictures. You can take a stiff bristled brush and a hoof pick to them, instead

You're in Massachusetts? Lots of frozen ground and probably plenty of divets or him to walk around.

There will be folks who disagree with me, but I would put boots on him for part of the day. He can't wear boots 24/7 but, if they are good fitting trail riding boots, he can leave them on 12 hours every day. Be sure to scrub the insides every night. I have been booting my foundered horse for nearly two years and send him out on 20+ acres without issue but, the boots have to fit snug enough they won't come off and still not rub his heel bulbs.

I know I'm asking a moot question when I say "who in the sam hill would rescue a Mustang and then let the things happen to this horse that happened to him? I hear about this a lot. It's just what a wild horse needs. Many kudos to you for taking him and the very best in your future with him - he's a pretty fella

Thank you for the encouragement! His front only has 1 crack, then that darker line that is thicker to the right is not a crack.
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post #13 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 12:06 PM
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Nick had a crack in the back near hoof, all the way up to the coronet band. His former owner said he'd always had it and it didn't bother him. Then over time developed cracks on the front hooves. I was told he was flat-footed and flares were going to be common.

I learned on these forums that was Bullcookies! I changed farriers and got a wonderful lady who's been working with him since last summer. I fed Farrier's Choice to help them grow out faster and we trimmed every 4-5 weeks. Today the bad crack in the back is gone. The cracks in the front are gone. The flares are gone. We're working on getting the sole concave again and it's coming slowly.

Good feed, good farrier, patience and time. :)

Sometimes I wrestle with my demons. Sometimes we just snuggle.
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post #14 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 12:12 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Red Gate Farm View Post
Nick had a crack in the back near hoof, all the way up to the coronet band. His former owner said he'd always had it and it didn't bother him. Then over time developed cracks on the front hooves. I was told he was flat-footed and flares were going to be common.

I learned on these forums that was Bullcookies! I changed farriers and got a wonderful lady who's been working with him since last summer. I fed Farrier's Choice to help them grow out faster and we trimmed every 4-5 weeks. Today the bad crack in the back is gone. The cracks in the front are gone. The flares are gone. We're working on getting the sole concave again and it's coming slowly.

Good feed, good farrier, patience and time. :)

I don't feed grain though, since he is an easy keeper. Would supplements affect his weight or make him hot?
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post #15 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 12:54 PM
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If he's on a hay diet, there may be vitamins or minerals that he may need. I think I would supplement like others are saying. How deep are the splits? To stop it, it may be as simple as rolling the edges of the hoof with a good size roll to lift that outer wall out of having so much contact with the ground. Some call that a Mustang roll (really!) The outside wall of the hoof may need to have the inner wall support the horse.

That is a mighty good looking mustang!
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post #16 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 01:08 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches View Post
If he's on a hay diet, there may be vitamins or minerals that he may need. I think I would supplement like others are saying. How deep are the splits? To stop it, it may be as simple as rolling the edges of the hoof with a good size roll to lift that outer wall out of having so much contact with the ground. Some call that a Mustang roll (really!) The outside wall of the hoof may need to have the inner wall support the horse.

That is a mighty good looking mustang!
Thanks for the tip! I am surprised the barefoot trimmers let it get this way, since they went all over the country and the UK studying farrier schools and specializing in barefoot trimming :(

And yes, I think he is a very good looking mustang as well!
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post #17 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 01:40 PM
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Ditto a vit/min supplement.

Hay from the same field but different cuttings, can vary in the level of vitamins & minerals, so supplementing might be best for him anyway.

Since he is used to eating nothing but hay, you could buy a quality condensed vit/min supplement; condensed supplements only require one or two ounces maximum, for the horse to get what it needs.

Being in Massachusetts, you might have a good selection of feed/tack stores in which to snoop around for condensed vitamins

If not, Tractor Supply carries Manna Pro's "ShoGlo" and also their own DuMor brand of condensed vitamin. I am not a fan of anything DuMor but that's just me. I do know that Manna Pro has been around since my dad was milking cattle in the 1950's and they are still very reliable:)

You could buy a bag of straight timothy pellets (also at Tractor Supply) and mix the vit/min supplement into a cup or two of pellets, with some water.

This way you're not getting into having to look for a quality ration balancer and have to worry about buying that and feeding 2 - 4 pounds daily in order for your horse to get his required amount of vit/min.

Something else that will help hooves and coats beyond belief is Omega-3 Horseshine. TSC also sells that

There are some folks on this forum from Massachusetts and bordering states. If you don't have anyone, maybe they could help you line up a good farrier or trimmer.

As has been mentioned, keeping him trimmed every 4 - 5 weeks will work wonders to keep the flaring under control and hopefully get rid of those cracks

We really appreciate the pictures but it is a "Rule" that, when a new horse comes home, pictures in his new digs should be posted ASAP

What is the handsome face's name?

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #18 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 01:45 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
Ditto a vit/min supplement.

Hay from the same field but different cuttings, can vary in the level of vitamins & minerals, so supplementing might be best for him anyway.

Since he is used to eating nothing but hay, you could buy a quality condensed vit/min supplement; condensed supplements only require one or two ounces maximum, for the horse to get what it needs.

Being in Massachusetts, you might have a good selection of feed/tack stores in which to snoop around for condensed vitamins

If not, Tractor Supply carries Manna Pro's "ShoGlo" and also their own DuMor brand of condensed vitamin. I am not a fan of anything DuMor but that's just me. I do know that Manna Pro has been around since my dad was milking cattle in the 1950's and they are still very reliable:)

You could buy a bag of straight timothy pellets (also at Tractor Supply) and mix the vit/min supplement into a cup or two of pellets, with some water.

This way you're not getting into having to look for a quality ration balancer and have to worry about buying that and feeding 2 - 4 pounds daily in order for your horse to get his required amount of vit/min.

Something else that will help hooves and coats beyond belief is Omega-3 Horseshine. TSC also sells that

There are some folks on this forum from Massachusetts and bordering states. If you don't have anyone, maybe they could help you line up a good farrier or trimmer.

As has been mentioned, keeping him trimmed every 4 - 5 weeks will work wonders to keep the flaring under control and hopefully get rid of those cracks

We really appreciate the pictures but it is a "Rule" that, when a new horse comes home, pictures in his new digs should be posted ASAP

What is the handsome face's name?
Thanks, walkinthewalk!

His previous owners had named him Vinnie, but I am Italian and have a cousin Vinnie (haha, yes I know). Soo I am changing his name to Roo - like Kanga and Roo from Winnie the Poo. He has a super cute personality and feel it suits him!


I will post pictures soon soon soon... He is delivered Saturday!

The barefoot trimmer "near" me (about an hour north?) finally responded to my email and said that she suggests xrays just to see where everything is (cost estimates, anyone???), but that she has had AWESOME success with growing out cracks.
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post #19 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 03:13 PM
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I can understand the logic behind the trimmer wanting X-rays but that is generally not something trimmers ask for unless the horse has foundered in the past or, you know he has had hoof damage from an accident.

Did you get a pre-purchase exam? If so, I would call that vet and ask their opinion on the necessity of x-rays.

I have a feeling x-rays are pretty costly in Massachusetts. I would think a bit on that expense - lol

The only thing I see it doing at this point is give you baseline. I have a horse with a Less-than-grade-1 club hoof who has never been x-rayed in the 17+ years he's been with me and I still don't see a need for it.

I live in a very rural county in southern Middle Tennessee. My vet is a leg specialist, who often gets flown to shows if a client has issues.

He only charged me $177 the day he x-ray both fronts when my horse foundered in 2012. He did something else while he was here but I can't remember what it was as I have four horses. He also waived the road fee of $40.

If you did not get a pre-purchase exam, you're going to have to get on board with a vet anyway -- this is a good way to start.

If you are on the Connecticut side of Massachusetts, I know someone I can ask for a vet recommendation but it won't be cheap - as I understand the Connecticut folks pay as much or more for veterinary care as you do

Provided the vet is licensed to practice in both states:)

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #20 of 84 Old 01-21-2014, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by aharlov View Post
I don't feed grain though, since he is an easy keeper. Would supplements affect his weight or make him hot?
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I don't feed grain either. The supplement goes into his soaked beet pulp and sticks to it, so he eats it. The Farriers Choice should not affect his weight or make him hot. The beet pulp will not make him hot either, but may add some weight to him. It's a safe feed.

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