How to Trim - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 07-02-2020, 02:23 PM Thread Starter
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How to Trim

Obviously, there is flare, too much bar and heel(s), broken-forward, flat toe, etc. but specifically and in-depth (don't just say "trim to balance to hoof"), how would you trim these horse's hooves back into correct balance?
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post #2 of 8 Old 07-03-2020, 12:47 AM
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Firstly, very nice pics! For even more accuracy, just ensure side-on on the ground pic is taken squarely side-on, and a pic sighting down the sole from heel to toe would also be helpful.

I'd just keep the heels down a tad more & 'roll' the toe more, beveling slightly from 'breakover'. To work out a/p balance I suggest studying the ELPO guidelines & also pay attention to the true sole plane & depth of co-lateral groove depth.
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post #3 of 8 Old 07-06-2020, 04:33 PM Thread Starter
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The farrier just came out. He said he did not see any white line separation or overgrown bars. Really? I feel like you can clearly see it, even in pictures. hmmmm
How good are domestic horse's hooves? I have seen wild horse's hooves and they are beauts. I know that her hooves will never look like a wild horse's one due to environment and other factors, but really? The farrier said he works with TB's hooves mainly (and you know the "TB hooves bad" stereotype) and that her hooves are great and that "the bars are perfect" (exact quote). Like, are you for real right now? I never said her hooves were "bad", just that they could be better.

I'm going to learn how to trim her myself. Reading everything. Watching everything. Go to clinics. etc... The search for a GOOD farrier is driving me crazy! *screech noisez*
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post #4 of 8 Old 07-06-2020, 10:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeker6 View Post
The farrier just came out. He said he did not see any white line separation or overgrown bars. Really? I feel like you can clearly see it, even in pictures. hmmmm
Bars are not hugely overgrown, but esp given heel height, def too long IMO. Taking them down to near the *true*(live) sole plane will allow you better to see how much heels can come down. Appears there is some separation/infection likely in the rear of the quarters at least. Maybe it's really shallow though, or trimmed out now. Looks like laminae is likely a tad stretched most places, but perhaps not actually separated. Newly trimmed pics will give more...

Quote:
How good are domestic horse's hooves? I have seen wild horse's hooves and they are beauts. I know that her hooves will never look like a wild horse's one due to environment and other factors, but really?
It's a matter of 'deed over breed'. It's little to do with genetics, breed, etc, but everything to do with environmental factors & I can show you some extremely lousy feral feets too - Eg. horses that live in swampy land, such as Barmah National Park here, or the Camargue in France. Horses that live on constant soft sand or such - they've got rid of the brumbies from Fraser Island off Qld coast here now, but there were arab x clydie brums there descended from shipwrecks of horses being imported for the police force & also for the logging industry. Their hooves were all very flat soled & flared.

Generally when you see egs of good wild hooves, these are from desert/arid region animals who do many, many miles daily over rough terrain(at slow paces). There was one(at least) study done here (Hampstead & Pollitt) where they took a rather crap footed brumby mare from a 'cushy' & soft Qld environment and dumped her in the desert in the Centre with a mob of ferals. Came back many months later & the horse had survived & thrived, her feet had become strong & sound. But I bet she endured many months of difficulty before she was able to do the required miles to keep up with the mob comfortably. And then, domestic horses, while often kept/worked in far from ideal situations, if they do have healthy management, lifestyle, enough daily stimulation/wearing on varied ground, then they too will develop the 'rock crunching' bare hooves of arid region ferals. But due to environment & lifestyle, most domestics will have less than ideal feets & will need artificial protection in some situations at least.

Quote:
The farrier said he works with TB's hooves mainly (and you know the "TB hooves bad" stereotype) and that her hooves are great and that "the bars are perfect" (exact quote). Like, are you for real right now? I never said her hooves were "bad", just that they could be better.
Yeah, Dr Bowker has likened it to not recognising neurological problems if they're anywhere short of paraplegia! Unfortunately, unhealthy hooves are soooo common as to be taken for the norm by many, including vets & farriers! So they don't recognise 'minor' stuff, only if it's blatantly obvious or is causing lameness.

Quote:
I'm going to learn how to trim her myself. Reading everything. Watching everything. Go to clinics. etc... The search for a GOOD farrier is driving me crazy! *screech noisez*
Yep, reason so many of us started learning/doing ourselves was for lack of good options.
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post #5 of 8 Old 07-07-2020, 06:42 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Bars are not hugely overgrown, but esp given heel height, def too long IMO. Taking them down to near the *true*(live) sole plane will allow you better to see how much heels can come down. Appears there is some separation/infection likely in the rear of the quarters at least. Maybe it's really shallow though, or trimmed out now. Looks like laminae is likely a tad stretched most places, but perhaps not actually separated. Newly trimmed pics will give more...
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Yeah, Dr Bowker has likened it to not recognising neurological problems if they're anywhere short of paraplegia! Unfortunately, unhealthy hooves are soooo common as to be taken for the norm by many, including vets & farriers! So they don't recognise 'minor' stuff, only if it's blatantly obvious or is causing lameness.
I think there was some miscommunication between the farrier and I. Her bars are overgrown, but I did not say grossly. I meant that they were more overgrown than I'd like in relationship to the last time she was trimmed. But he was like, "No. If they were overgrown, they'd be folded and quashed over." (exact quote) smh.
I guess stretched was the word I was looking for, not "separated." Again, probably miscommunication. Her hoof is not as "tight" as I'd like or should be (as before in the past). He said, "If there was separation, I'd be able to stick the whole hoof pick in." (exact quote). Like, no, you don't wait that long, dude.
When I was a total hoof noob, basically, the farrier's word was law, if you know what I mean. She (the farrier) messed up my horse horse's hooves - bad. She waited until there was actual separation. She abscessed for months. My horse was so lame. She needed shoes. And the farrier was like, "this happens all the time - totally normal. It's because of the rain/wet environment." not considering it was due to how she was trimming - and that it was a dry year (relatively). And, being a noob, I believed her. I know better know and, you know, once bitten, twice shy kind of thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
And then, domestic horses, while often kept/worked in far from ideal situations, if they do have healthy management, lifestyle, enough daily stimulation/wearing on varied ground, then they too will develop the 'rock crunching' bare hooves of arid region ferals. But due to environment & lifestyle, most domestics will have less than ideal feets & will need artificial protection in some situations at least.
Her hooves seem (keyword) pretty hard. She goes over rock, gravel, paved roads, etc. with no soreness. All the farriers said that she had some of the toughest feet. So much so that one had a little trouble trimming. I think he needed to sharpen his tools. lol
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post #6 of 8 Old 07-07-2020, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeker6 View Post
He said, "If there was separation, I'd be able to stick the whole hoof pick in." (exact quote). Like, no, you don't wait that long, dude.
OMG my farrier said the same thing about one of my horse's hooves. And I had the exact same reaction...
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post #7 of 8 Old 07-07-2020, 11:35 AM
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Different discussion but (wild as well as domestic) hooves develop based on the environment and wear they get inherently if out 24/7. While we may not like how a particular hoof looks, it developed to suit the environment. Cleaning it up and trimming with use in mind becomes an exercise in balance.
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post #8 of 8 Old 07-07-2020, 06:13 PM
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^yep, definitely trim a bit differently for horses in different work/lifestyle/environments. Basic principles all the same tho.
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