Low Plantar Angles - Update - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 19 Old 08-29-2019, 10:43 PM
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Those vids, again, show a prob which I'm guessing is not the feet. I'd still be getting a chiropractic vet involved to check her out all over. As I think I said, that's no slight on your 'normal' vet, if they don't pic up those sorts of details, but just like you don't expect a GP Doctor to suss out, let alone fix all sorts of body issues, but they might refer you to a specialist to do so, vets don't always understand bodywork/issues in great detail unless they have specialised.
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Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #12 of 19 Old 08-30-2019, 12:29 AM
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That last video looks so much better. I'd say close attention to trimming as you're doing along with gradual conditioning will work wonders for her. From what I've read, horses bred for big lick potential have lax tendons, and at her age they are even looser. Getting some muscle development will help tighten everything up and keep her from being wobbly.

I agree with @dogpatch that the hoof angle changes will come slowly as the hoof grows down tighter and you hopefully get more caudal development.

I'm somewhere between @loosie and @dogpatch in thoughts about correcting the negative angles. It's somewhat experimental for each horse. As @loosie points out, if you don't bring the landing surface of the heel back far enough, and create the heel buttress platform, those heel walls will keep collapsing and running forward. But also as @dogpatch says, if you take the heel too low you will never be able to get the tubules in the heel to grow down less angled.

What I've seen is that farriers who believe all you need to do is lift the heel, bring a platform back farther with a shoe, and then the hoof will grow better angles. But they don't trim the toe down enough to make the changes in the angle of the bones, and so the hoof keeps growing the same.

My belief is that you must approach both the toe and heel together. If you can get the horse's weight coming down through the hoof bones, the weight will stop crushing the heel. If radiographs truly show NPA, the horse will have enough sole under the coffin bone to be able to trim some off the toe and take the weight off the rear of the hoof.

If you just try to grow taller heels, it won't change the weight distribution of the hoof. You have to take more toe off than heel for each growth cycle until the weight is distributed better. If you simply take the heels down so the horse has a flat landing area, it won't help since the toe will keep preventing the heel growth.


Imagine in the above xray how massive of a heel wedge would have to be applied in order to correct the coffin bone angle, if you didn't take a lot of toe down. But what you can do is take the toe down some and equally important, get it back to the correct breakover point so the horse can begin to weight through the bones. That alone will begin to encourage the heel to stand up more, and keeping the landing platform of the heel buttress flat as far back as possible will help too. But it will take a long time for that toe correction to begin to help the heel growth, which will in turn help the toe connection grow in tighter and farther back.
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post #13 of 19 Old 08-30-2019, 01:01 AM Thread Starter
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@gottatrot Thanks for all the advice. Did you see my rough sketches of her radical hoof dimensions when I got her - and how they are today (previous page of this thread)? It shows you just what my farrier and I have done over the past 6 months. The true test will be Xrays and another gait exam - next week.

Check this link from DVM360: http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/neg...-racing-horses

I'm hoping, of course, that, if plantar angles are the root of the problem, they are being resolved through trimming (grade 1 - photo 3 - third page - of the DVM360 article). My plan is to first address the very obvious hoof issues my filly had when I got her, then seek other, possible more subtle issues up her legs and body. So depending on the vet's Xrays and third gait analysis next week, we'll go from there. BTW, I've already had 2 acupuncture treatments for her, and will be open to anything my vets recommend once they have Xrays of my filly's now much more "normal profile" hooves.
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post #14 of 19 Old 08-30-2019, 01:35 AM
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That is an excellent link. I hope you will post the xrays on here for our education.

It will be interesting to see how her coffin bone angles are after the trimming you've done.

From your diagrams, the severely long toes contributed a lot to her issues.
Although it's not technically wringing the hocks, one of my mares that had long toes on the hinds when I got her would set her foot down and twist it outward before picking it up rather than breaking over at the toe. Even though she had probably done this for years, once I brought her toes back she changed her way of going.
I had been told by several farriers that she walked like that because she was cow hocked and that made her hooves grow unbalanced, which caused the problem. Actually it was the fact that her hooves were unbalanced that made her twist like that.

It's good you are able to work on this while your mare is still so young.
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post #15 of 19 Old 08-30-2019, 09:36 PM Thread Starter
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I think you're right on the money, @gottatrot ! The way I imagine my filly's feet when I got her is like this: It's as though you or I were wearing high-heel shoes, then permanently cemented all the bones of the feet and ankles in that position, removed the shoes, and tried to walk. What would happen? Normal "breakover" would be impossible with every step, so something would have to give - unless I just wanted to walk on my toes. But if I wanted to place my feet flat on the ground (heels too) with every step? Answer: I'd have to let my knees go sideways - causing lots of pain in my knees, hips, and back. And I'd probably tear some knee ligaments and cartilage in the process. I'd be completely lame.


On the other hand, my baby just keeps getting better every day now. Took her out for a short trail ride and hill work again today, then filmed her in the ring. Short LH stride almost all gone. No toe-stabbing or knuckling-over. Still more hock wringing, but she's got a lot of hind leg muscle development ahead of her that should help. Here you go (oh, and she was being annoyed by some deer flies in the ring, which is reflected in her occasionally pinned ears, swishing tail, and occasional odd strides. At least she didn't try to "karate kick them today - Haha!):


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Last edited by RichardX; 08-30-2019 at 09:51 PM.
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post #16 of 19 Old 08-31-2019, 03:12 AM
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I thought you said you weren't riding the horse, when it was suggested you shouldn't be, in the last thread. While yes, strengthening work is good for her as a rule, while she's still got issues, esp as she's still so young as well, I would definitely not be riding her. Get her straightened out first. At least, ride her only on a good vet's advice.

Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #17 of 19 Old 09-02-2019, 10:52 AM
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I still seen an “offness”, and agree with Loosie, but....my DH’s TWH mare does this with him, but not with me, because I RIDE her, instead of just being a passenger. May I suggest that you gather up the reins a bit, so there is a little contact, the horse’s head will come up a bit, she will shift some weight from the front to the back, and be a LOT smoother.

She looks like a really nice horse!
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Last edited by loosie; 09-03-2019 at 12:41 AM.
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post #18 of 19 Old 09-02-2019, 10:11 PM Thread Starter
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@greentree Others have told me to give her more free rein. And others have told me they think my contact with my horse's mouth is ideal. I didn't come on this forum to argue or hear how your riding style is better than mine. I'm seeking answers on experience with negative / low plantar angles. Thanks

Last edited by RichardX; 09-02-2019 at 10:24 PM.
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post #19 of 19 Old 09-03-2019, 12:44 AM
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^While you're not asking for riding/training advice specifically & people should respect that, I took GT's suggestion as something that effects the way the horse travels, so relevant to this discussion.
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Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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