New Farrier - The Horse Forum
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  • 3 Post By horselovinguy
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post #1 of 7 Old 07-01-2020, 06:17 PM Thread Starter
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New Farrier

I am trying out a new farrier soon. The previous farriers that I had left too much bar, heel, flare (in my opinion) and caused my horse's hooves to have white line separation. They rasped the outer wall and toe way too much (again, in my opinion, but my horse had thin walls and basically had no toe RIP). They chip like crazy, even two weeks after. Before I switched, due to moving, her hooves were great, but now...

How can I bring up these problems with the new farrier? I feel weird because I have had no "formal" training. So... it's like, "hey, can u maybe do *this* because I saw it via the internet this one time a few months ago - plz" vs. the opinion of someone who went to horse farrier college and did farrier work for over a decade. Seems... arrogant of me. BUT, I know my horses feet. So, how can bring up the problems with the new farrier and offer "suggestions" without sounding like a... barn-witch type thing?
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post #2 of 7 Old 07-01-2020, 09:19 PM
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Most farriers that are good will see the issues and address them. My current farrier that I started using last year.

Saw the issues and addressed them,I never told him what needed done. Told him some of the issues, horses had with lameness and abscesses.

Doesn't go over to good with most farriers, telling them how to do there job.
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post #3 of 7 Old 07-01-2020, 10:26 PM
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There is a difference is telling them how to do their job and asking them questions and making a comment that when you lived such-and -such a place the farrier appeared to do what you noticed as....
Farriers can follow a thought trail ...

But asking, offering is far different from telling them..
If it is a new farrier any information offered is often a help to them to know what you see as lousy feet were not always that way, so something is happening affecting the horse negatively.

So, I will put this though to you...
Did you change feed fed in amounts, brand?
Did you add or remove supplements?
Has your hay changed that you feed?
Pasture grasses eaten since the grass must get nutrients from the ground....
Is your horse eating something in their pasture/paddock they may not of had access to before??

If your horse had good feet, you moved and now the horse has lousy feet...
Time to do a process of elimination of what changed in environment, possibly in diet as it takes about 6 months think it is to start to see, notice ill effects of a feed regiment show their ugliness...you know the farrier changed but did anything else?
...
jmo...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #4 of 7 Old 07-01-2020, 11:44 PM
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Ditto to HLG. Don't tell him what to do, but tell him what has been done & what problems you had, that you sus were because of it, and ASK him how he would deal with those probs & if he will trim differently. Have you seen other horses trimmed by this farrier? Has he been recommended by people who seem to know a lot about hoof function, etc?
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post #5 of 7 Old 07-01-2020, 11:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
There is a difference is telling them how to do their job and asking them questions and making a comment that when you lived such-and -such a place the farrier appeared to do what you noticed as....
Farriers can follow a thought trail ...
This is what I was going to say before I read the comments. Questions will always go over better than telling, and you get to absorb some of the farrier's knowledge along the way, gain a better understanding of what they're doing and why, and establish respect on both sides. It'll also help you tell the difference between a competent farrier and a not-so-competent farrier.

For example, what I said to my farrier as he was trimming... "I noticed my horse's hooves are a tad longer on the inside. What do you do to correct that?" He said he noticed that too, then explained what he was doing to correct it, real-time, how and why he was doing it, and what he'll do in future sessions to keep the issue under control. I learned a lot and he earned my respect for 1) noticing and addressing the issue and 2) teaching me along the way. I seemed to earn his respect as well because he said I had a good eye for catching that subtle abnormality. If he had said "Oh, I didn't notice that" or "I wasn't planning on correcting it" my respect for him would not have been as high. If I had said "I need you to do it this way" his respect for me would not have been as high.

We see it all the time in vet med. "My pet is doing x so the internet told me it's y and I need you to do z to fix it." Never goes over well, just makes all parties frustrated and inflexible.
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post #6 of 7 Old 07-02-2020, 05:54 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
So, I will put this though to you...
Did you change feed fed in amounts, brand?
Did you add or remove supplements?
Has your hay changed that you feed?
Pasture grasses eaten since the grass must get nutrients from the ground....
Is your horse eating something in their pasture/paddock they may not of had access to before??
Actually, every thing is almost the same. Since I moved, the grass isn't the same, obviously, but everything else is pretty much. I moved back in Jan. 2020.
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post #7 of 7 Old 07-02-2020, 05:55 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Have you seen other horses trimmed by this farrier? Has he been recommended by people who seem to know a lot about hoof function, etc?
No, unfortunately. Farriers are really hard to find here, so it's just a guy we found on the interwebz.
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