Rescue pony - Hooves - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 01:06 PM Thread Starter
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Rescue pony - Hooves

Hello,

My barn owner (BO) just took in a rescue pony this week. The poor pony was tossed around quite a bit and the barn owner agreed to take in the pony temporarily for the old owner, who is mostly removed from the situation. The guy who had the pony previously went over 6 months without farrier care , then had a farrier take it all off before the barn owner showed up to pick the pony up. It seems the farrier rasped the wall down lower than the sole, but the pony also looks to have had foundered in the past :(

That being said, the barn owner and I are trying to do what we can for the pony. The pony's owner is leaning towards euthanization, as she is quite upset that the pony ended up in such a bad situation. The BO is trying to convince her to give the pony another chance, but of course that will be up to the owner in the end. The BO and I are trying to do as much as we can and brainstorm in the meantime If we have the chance at rehabilitation. The pony seems to be at a good weight (not over or under) and walking alright, although obviously he'd be a little sore. Funds are limited, so I don't think x-rays will be in the books right now, but barn owner is trying to do what is possible and the pony does seem comfortable despite his hooves. Her farrier is coming out this week and barn owner is looking into affordable supplements to help growth, as well as any other options.

I've had a little experience with mild laminitis episodes in the past with my own horse, so I gave her a couple of suggestions of my own. However, I don't have any experience dealing with vastly overgrown hooves that were then trimmed too short. Is there anything I can do to get the pony off his soles? I put some Venice turpentine on last night, as that was all I had available at the time. He is also on lots of bedding. He has quite small hooves, so I may be able to rig up some kind of boot, but I'm not quite sure where to start with that. I've always used hoof boots on my guy, who has enormous hooves. When my farrier is down, I'll be having him take a look at the pony as well as he is great with laminitis/founder issues + pretty creative with diy options and utd on new possible treatments.

What I've got so far is:

- Ice to keep any possible inflammation down (I'm there at least once a day)
- pony was put on low sugar diet (ration balancer) and will soon be on remission.
-I'll be having the hay tested for my horses, so will share with BO to help get the pony on a more balanced diet to help with hoof growth.
- Venice turpentine where applicable.
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post #2 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 01:51 PM
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Since neutering the farrier who took too much hoof in one strike is out the question -- on to some possible aids

1. Even if the pony is not apparently foot-sore, you could buy some generic bags of frozen peas (they're cheap:) and duct tape them to his hooves for 20 minutes twice daily.

2. Can you or the BO get your hands on some used boots? Maybe either of your farrier's might have some or know someone who does?

If not, after measuring buy a new pair of therapy boots and also the pads to go with them, to keep the sole comfortable?

If the trim is fresh and the toes are cut right to the white line, I would call the boot company of your choice and have them help you with sizing:)

2.1. To reiterate, therapy boots almost always have pads with the boots and also have extra pads available for purchase.

I am sold on EasyCare's Clouds and their RX Therapy boots. The Clouds however, seem to fit wider hooves better.

3. Venice Turpentine is good. So is Durasol. So is Keretex which I have been using on my foundered horse since 2012, very frequently. He is still alive and so am I (some folks fuss about the formaldehyde but wear gloves if that is a serious worry for you:):)

It goes without saying, none of these mentioned products should come in contact with any fleshy part of the hoof -- not even the frogs:)

4. If he is at good weight, have the BO get him off anything with grain. If you are having success with what you feed your laminitic horse, give it try on the pony.

Grass hay - tested if at all possible.

Limited pasture time.

As much attention and smoochies on the snoot as you folks can give the little doll face. Which, BTW, where are the pictures:).
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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #3 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 02:01 PM
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Pictures would help. If he's doing ok that is the most important thing but ultimately there are far worse things then euthanasia. Bigger picture is important too, age and overall health? Even if he rehabs 100% is there a good permanent home available?

Now as far as his feet the most important thing is to get a vet involved not just the farrier.. I would highly recommend xrays, there's no way to know without them and if he's going to have any sort of chance it's most important to gather information now. I'm sure the farriers will say the same thing.

As far as care pending all this I agree with what you've said. I'm not sure icing is necessary but it won't hurt, same with the diet, definitely won't hurt especially since his weight is good. Treating any horse as a founder candidate will only help them. The tricky part is if they also need calories which isn't the case here. Like I said pictures would help as far as actual feet suggestions, but I think less is more until you have a game plan given to you by the vet and farrier (they should collaborate on his care). Common sense, if he's sore don't push him. I likely wouldn't restrict movement unless he's really bad, moving around is very helpful. I would keep him on soft footing and restrict any crazies as much as possible (don't turn him out in a big pen with a group). I think you mostly just need to hang tight for now, but do get the vet out not just farriers.

I know the owner may not be ok with pictures, but pictures of his feet even if you're not allowed to photograph the horse would be great. @loosie has a link on how to take pictures in her profile. Glad this guy is in good hands now!
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post #4 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
Since neutering the farrier who took too much hoof in one strike is out the question -- on to some possible aids

HAHA wish It were Legal XD

1. Even if the pony is not apparently foot-sore, you could buy some generic bags of frozen peas (they're cheap:) and duct tape them to his hooves for 20 minutes twice daily.

Will do! I'm going to start with that tonight. I'll let the BO know about the frozen peas. I have large heavy duty freeze bags that I use for white lightening soaks and was thinking of putting ice in those tonight.

2. Can you or the BO get your hands on some used boots? Maybe either of your farrier's might have some or know someone who does?

If not, after measuring buy a new pair of therapy boots and also the pads to go with them, to keep the sole comfortable?

I was actually just thinking of that! I'm going to look around on fb and see If any are advertised. My farrier might as many of his clients use them.

If the trim is fresh and the toes are cut right to the white line, I would call the boot company of your choice and have them help you with sizing:)

2.1. To reiterate, therapy boots almost always have pads with the boots and also have extra pads available for purchase.

I am sold on EasyCare's Clouds and their RX Therapy boots. The Clouds however, seem to fit wider hooves better.

Do you think It would be possible to make some kind of temporary boot in the meantime? I have some padding I could use and possibly vet wrap or something similar to hold it on.

3. Venice Turpentine is good. So is Durasol. So is Keretex which I have been using on my foundered horse since 2012, very frequently. He is still alive and so am I (some folks fuss about the formaldehyde but wear gloves if that is a serious worry for you:):)

It goes without saying, none of these mentioned products should come in contact with any fleshy part of the hoof -- not even the frogs:)

4. If he is at good weight, have the BO get him off anything with grain. If you are having success with what you feed your laminitic horse, give it try on the pony.

I wish the BO could use the stuff I'm using. Problem is that it is relatively expensive and I bring it over the border. I'm looking around for something similar though at a cheaper price point.

Grass hay - tested if at all possible.

Limited pasture time.

As much attention and smoochies on the snoot as you folks can give the little doll face. Which, BTW, where are the pictures:).
HAHA definitely have that one covered ;) I swear, the moment I saw this pony at the barn, my inner little girl came out and my own horses got a wee bit jealous
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post #5 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
Pictures would help. If he's doing ok that is the most important thing but ultimately there are far worse things then euthanasia. Bigger picture is important too, age and overall health? Even if he rehabs 100% is there a good permanent home available?

yes, we understand that anything can happen in a new home. If we go through with the rehabilitation, then we'd be only looking at people with references from a vet, farrier and instructor. Luckily the barn owner and I have good connections in the horse community, so we might have an easier time finding potential homes than the owner did.

Now as far as his feet the most important thing is to get a vet involved not just the farrier.. I would highly recommend xrays, there's no way to know without them and if he's going to have any sort of chance it's most important to gather information now. I'm sure the farriers will say the same thing.

I will ask her about this. The pony just arrived yesterday, so I'm not sure how much money the BO and original owner are willing to sink in and unfortunately X-rays are very expensive around here (60$ + per shot). farrier is arriving this week though and we will have a better idea of the hoof situation.

As far as care pending all this I agree with what you've said. I'm not sure icing is necessary but it won't hurt, same with the diet, definitely won't hurt especially since his weight is good. Treating any horse as a founder candidate will only help them. The tricky part is if they also need calories which isn't the case here. Like I said pictures would help as far as actual feet suggestions, but I think less is more until you have a game plan given to you by the vet and farrier (they should collaborate on his care). Common sense, if he's sore don't push him. I likely wouldn't restrict movement unless he's really bad, moving around is very helpful. I would keep him on soft footing and restrict any crazies as much as possible (don't turn him out in a big pen with a group). I think you mostly just need to hang tight for now, but do get the vet out not just farriers.

Sounds good.

I know the owner may not be ok with pictures, but pictures of his feet even if you're not allowed to photograph the horse would be great. @loosie has a link on how to take pictures in her profile. Glad this guy is in good hands now!
I will try and get photos later this week :) I know we'd get lots of great advice from you guys that would help!
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post #6 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 04:17 PM
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1. There is a type of heavy duty styrofoam folks on here have recommended but I cannot remember exactly what type or what local store(s) it came from. It can be duct taped on the hooves. How long it stays on will depend how active the pony is and also how fast he crushes thru it.

Hopefully someone will come with the info, or I can get lucky with a search and find it:)

2. If you buy used boots, you can make your own pads out of those 1/2" or 5/8" interlocking 12 X 12 mats that WalMart sells. They last for several days and a package of those squares was dirt cheap when I was buying them, 4-5 years back.

I have a boxful of boots ranging from well worn to used, to barely used to never on the hooves. They are different models from EasyCare but they are all Size 1's and one pair of Size 2's from the old days when I wanted to shoot the farrier who was great at shoeing & trimming healthy hooves but ended up not knowing squat about foundered hooves.

^^^^Thats why I get so preachy to people with foundered horses that their farrier may not be so great after all, if that person does not have the schooling to rehab a foundered horse. Shooting from the hip causes more harm than good most of the time:)

3. You've got the feed covered, some how some way, lol. However MSM is not expensive and is great for reducing various types of inflammation. Maybe buy a tub of MSM?

My area feed stores & tack shops carry "Animed's" MSM. I have always had good luck with it. I have had to graduate my foundered horse to something much more expensive (the vet's orders) as he also lives with a fractured sacrum but if I didn't need to address the old sacrum injury, I would still have him on pure MSM.
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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #7 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 04:51 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
1. There is a type of heavy duty styrofoam folks on here have recommended but I cannot remember exactly what type or what local store(s) it came from. It can be duct taped on the hooves. How long it stays on will depend how active the pony is and also how fast he crushes thru it.

I was looking up previous forum threads and on mentioned dollar store flip flops. I might try those and see if that works.

Hopefully someone will come with the info, or I can get lucky with a search and find it:)

2. If you buy used boots, you can make your own pads out of those 1/2" or 5/8" interlocking 12 X 12 mats that WalMart sells. They last for several days and a package of those squares was dirt cheap when I was buying them, 4-5 years back.

I have a boxful of boots ranging from well worn to used, to barely used to never on the hooves. They are different models from EasyCare but they are all Size 1's and one pair of Size 2's from the old days when I wanted to shoot the farrier who was great at shoeing & trimming healthy hooves but ended up not knowing squat about foundered hooves.

^^^^Thats why I get so preachy to people with foundered horses that their farrier may not be so great after all, if that person does not have the schooling to rehab a foundered horse. Shooting from the hip causes more harm than good most of the time:)

I can completely relate! It's amazing how many 'farriers' out there that don't actually do a proper trim. I've went through several myself. I've also heard of a few farriers with "good" reputations here that insisted on trimming a foundered horse every 9 weeks :O


3. You've got the feed covered, some how some way, lol. However MSM is not expensive and is great for reducing various types of inflammation. Maybe buy a tub of MSM?

Good idea! I have some for my horses and I think a sale is coming up soon at the tack store. I'll suggest it.

My area feed stores & tack shops carry "Animed's" MSM. I have always had good luck with it. I have had to graduate my foundered horse to something much more expensive (the vet's orders) as he also lives with a fractured sacrum but if I didn't need to address the old sacrum injury, I would still have him on pure MSM.
I didn't know Animed made a MSM supplement as well! I'll have to look into it.

Last edited by Jolly101; 07-31-2019 at 05:06 PM.
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post #8 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 05:16 PM
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Magic Cushion is something else I have in my sore hoof arsenal:)

https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail....SABEgJ_V_D_BwE

I have both the blue and the gold tubs. A little goes a long way but, believe me, you do not want to put this on the hoof then put boots on --- the boot might not want to come off and when it does, it will be an awful mess trying to clean the insides.

Magic Cushion would work well with the flip flops or styrofoam as that stuff gets thrown out once it it wears out.

2. I forgot to say that my point to the box of boots, is if the pony is big enough to fit into size one boots, I am pretty sure I can find something in my inventory that would still leave you money for eating supper out, lol

My beloved Duke (RIP) was 14.3H and considered a pony in the Walking Horse world, so "pony" can cover some height distance:)
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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #9 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 08:00 PM
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Little to add to above until pics. Except padding - styrofoam or cheap foam rubber compresses & wears pretty quickly. I use high density EVA closed cell foam & find it's pretty long lasting. You can get various thicknesses & densities too & buying it by the foot from a rubber supplies is way cheaper than from a hoof boot manufacturer - altho as Walkin said, if you're buying boots they should come with pads anyway. For the short term, just duct taping foam onto hooves will last a day or few just in a paddock situation, but you shouldn't generally leave them on for more than a day without cleaning/airing feet, to reduce chance of nasties growing. If you have to move them or such, I've used this 'emergency measure', walked a pony about half a mile on a gravel road, before they wore too much to stay on, needed more duct tape.
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post #10 of 27 Old 07-31-2019, 11:37 PM Thread Starter
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Was able to put together some hoof padding tonight and ice. I used a dollar store size 12 flip flop for the base and found a worker's comfort textured mat? at the dollar store which I used as the top for softer padding. taped it all together with duct tape and then strapped It on. seemed to do the trick and pony seemed to be walking better. I wasn't able to get pictures yet because my phone died on me, but will try next time.
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