Run forward feet - The Horse Forum
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  • 2 Post By loosie
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post #1 of 8 Old 06-19-2020, 05:05 AM Thread Starter
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Run forward feet

Here's a great(bad) example. Can you imagine the torque on that foot & the joints, just walking?? And you can see in the trimmed side, the toe is still slightly 'stretched' forward and there is serum in the laminae line, indicating damage.

While this particular one was probably also left too long in shoes before being put down for lameness, unfortunately it just isn't that rare, for farriers to shoe to the foot they see, rather than to where it should be.

Learn about hoof balance in relation to the bony column, to avoid your horse becoming one of these type examples... or fix it if he is, before it's too late.

Photo Credit: Andi Weishaupt
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post #2 of 8 Old 06-19-2020, 06:49 AM
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Holeee Moleee. I had to look at that three times to be sure what I was seeing. That is months of growth!

I can’t believe the shoe stay on during that much growth.

Somebody should have been shot for letting that happen.

What a horrible shame the horse had to be put down as a result of the lameness that caused. What a pretty hoof it still had under all of that neglect.

Hopefully this is another thread that you aren’t just preaching to the choir and “if just one person sees this—-“

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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #3 of 8 Old 06-19-2020, 07:01 AM
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@walkinthewalk I might be naive, but I get a feeling that there aren’t any people on this forum that would let their horse get into such a state. I would guess the poor horse in this photo was generally neglected, not just its feet. And people who neglect their horses hardly go online and spend time on horse forums. Again, I might just be naive, but I hope not.

Poor horse.
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post #4 of 8 Old 06-19-2020, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Horsef View Post
@walkinthewalk I might be naive, but I get a feeling that there aren’t any people on this forum that would let their horse get into such a state. I would guess the poor horse in this photo was generally neglected, not just its feet. And people who neglect their horses hardly go online and spend time on horse forums. Again, I might just be naive, but I hope not.

Poor horse.
That would be the hope but new horse owners are always at risk of dumb things.

it’s also possible that “that somebody knows somebody” because I’ve seen some nasty “this is not my horse” hoof pictures on forums. Never anything that looks like this but there’s been some bad ones thru the years:):)

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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #5 of 8 Old 06-19-2020, 07:54 AM
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This is from a farriers class and is a cadaver foot. You would be surprised how many people that don't reshoe if the horse has not lost a show. Or some breeds that want that really really long toe to promote a higher step.
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post #6 of 8 Old 06-19-2020, 07:55 AM
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This is from a farriers class and is a cadaver foot. You would be surprised how many people that don't reshoe if the horse has not lost a show. Or some breeds that want that really really long toe to promote a higher step.

I would say this is not truly a run forward heel but a foot left without care for too long. I have a Navicular mare with a truly run forward heel that is near impossible to correct - even with filing it every 2 weeks and keeping the toe brought back.
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post #7 of 8 Old 06-19-2020, 08:12 AM
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Before I actually got a horse I was under the impression that a horse's foot was sort of like a block of wood that shoes were nailed onto and the saddle was a sort of a back pack.


I'm not one to support all kinds of new laws, but I'd lean toward supporting the people being required to pass a test on nutrition, digestive system, hoof care, basic physiology, and saddle fitting before being allowed to own a horse. Might add a little psychology in there too.
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post #8 of 8 Old 06-19-2020, 08:19 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by carshon View Post
I would say this is not truly a run forward heel but a foot left without care for too long. I have a Navicular mare with a truly run forward heel that is near impossible to correct - even with filing it every 2 weeks and keeping the toe brought back.
Yeah, was speculating on why horse was put down, I don't know, just saw the pic online. It is obviously also very... ehem, overdue.

But yes, it is a 'truly' run forward foot too. My point in posting is that, IME, conventional peripheral loading shoeing does encourage this type of distortion, and then, without good understanding of hoof balance, they perpetuate the problem by shoeing to the foot they have... and so it goes, until hooves become grossly distorted like this. And unfortunately, in way too frequent cases, it seems that many farriers are simply none the wiser about it.

Re your 'navicular' horse, yeah, just good trimming often doesn't cut it with horses who have chronically crushed heels. They also need relief of pressure of those heel walls, by providing extra support under the frog/digital cushion **But not under the heel walls*. Of course, it's possible if this prob has been chronic since she was young & it's very long standing, that the damage may be 'too far gone' to heal, regardless. In which case, then palliative measures such as wedged shoes may be the best option for her.
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