Switching to boots - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 09:46 AM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
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My horse had significant hoof quality issues, and I also ended up having his shoes pulled for the same reasons that you described. I added quality supplements and bought boots for riding. The difference in his hoof quality now (as a barefoot horse) and before (as a shod horse) is draw-dropping amazing. (Note: I'm not at all against shoes. We ended up barefoot as a result of hoof quality issues, and it is working for us. But I'm not criticizing shoes.). He does live in a somewhat rocky field, so he was a bit tender-footed initially after having the shoes pulled. However, he adapted, and with the addition of supplements, his feet now are beautiful

Jenndieu, The supplements are an interesting thought. Even though I had absolutely no luck with any of them while shod I now wonder if the shoeing process and the shoes where inhibiting the effects of any supplements. I think it is worth investing in a good product to use while barefoot and see if I get better results. And I do anticipate that Dutch will adapt, but as tender as he is now I can only imagine how he's going to be when he no longer has those shoes between his big size 2's and the ground.

My biggest issue with using boots is the need to "trim" myself in between when the barefoot farrier comes. I use the quotation marks on "trim", because what I do is very moderate compared to what the trimmer does. I'm frightened of nippers, and so have not invested in a pair. (I could see myself lopping off a portion of my horses hoof). I use a hoof knife and a rasp and am able to keep my guy neatened up and fitting in his renegades between trims. (It is very difficult here to get a barefoot trim, so frequency for us is an issue. It sounds like you're in a lucky situation in that you have a good farrier just up the road who is willing to come frequently. I'm respectfully jealous.). I will say that learning some basics to keep the hoof neat in between trims really is not very hard. (If I can do it, most others can too!). I will add that if you do get a hoof knife, get a loop knife. It's much easier for women and those of us with arthritis

Jenn, I'm impressed with your skills of trimming yourself. I've wondered at it many times, but am terrified of doing more damage than good. Big Dutch is very easy to handle so would probably be a good candidate to learn on. Hmmmm.... we'll see. And, I'lll keep my eyes open for used options, but here in Arizona there are many barefoot horses. Most of what I've found used has been too well used or broken. Not sure I want to open a can of worms. And thank you so much for that offer of parts, but Dutch's feet are a size 2 now and I actually anticipate a little more as they grow and develop in a healthier way. Or that's my hope, anyway.

Hondo, I don't have pictures right now, but will get some this afternoon. I actually have a spare stall that I was using for storage and am cleaning it out for the specific purpose of working with feet. It's level, clean and dry with rubber mats over concrete. I know the area you ride in and will look into the Gloves and the fit kit. It may be an option for Dutch.
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post #12 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 10:36 AM Thread Starter
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Hondo, do you have pics of the gloves you use? I've read a little about them and the main complaint seems to be how difficult they are to get on. Is this true for you?
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post #13 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 12:16 PM
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Here is a link to pics on the easycare site. http://www.easycareinc.com/our_boots...oot_glove.aspx Or did you want pics of MY gloves?

I do not find them difficult to put on. For the fronts I get his knee in my hip joint to push against and then twist slightly left and right while pulling them on. When they are on and secure, they won't twist anymore. But I still check the center of his bulbs to make certain they are centered.

Sometimes when it is cold out, the boot can be a little more difficult to install. In those cases sometimes when I put his foot down the boot is not really fully installed. I pick it back up and use a dead blow mallet to tap then the rest of the way on. For that reason I generally bring the boots inside the night before if it is cold. 22F for the ovenite low last night.

The fit kit is 3 boots shells, one above and one below what you've measured for. Measurement and trim are important. The video for the boots and instructions for measurement should be followed carefully as with the video for the fit kit. The fit kit is $12 for shipping to and from. They send a USPS package all addressed and paid for to return the boot shells.

The boot shells can be purchased at 4/$88 which makes replacement $22 each. Not bad if you can just replace and use the old gaiters.

The new gaiter is a little more difficult to install as it does not stay folded back but it is much better than the old. I use one hand to hold it back while twisting it onto the foot.

So anyhow, once you spend $12 for the fit kit you will have your own idea of whether they are or are not difficult to apply.

Since I often cross water and have had problems with foot infections, I have begun adding a dilute solution of Lysol to the boot after installation. Not really necessary for a dry ride, but with water crossing it's a good idea for any boot that will hold water, IMO.
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post #14 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 12:40 PM
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Far as hoof boots and challenging riding, I have found none that give the same security of footing, as shoes, unless you add studs
I won't ride in hoof boots on steep climbs, esp if there are muddy /slippery areas, as you have no traction, and have in fact, taken hoof boots off for that reason, put then in my saddlebags, and rode barefoot
I also found that hoof boots just don't make a horse careful, picking their footing through tangled roots, ect, as they don't feel the ground
Even serious endurance riders that use hoof boots, versus shoes, have gone to glue on versions of those boots
Renegades with buckles



Pastern strap is applied loose, only as a sort of safety strap, thus not critical at all. Far as the heel captivator, you have to make sure you put it on high enough.
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post #15 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 12:46 PM
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Buckle modification on Cavellos

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post #16 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 12:52 PM
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I used the gloves, and they are easy to put on. You can use a rubber mallot to tap them in place.
However, they do not stay on well, JMO, unless you at least also add the power strap
Even then,m they blow off in tough going, and I thought Easycare discontinued them, by themselves, and build the Backcountry glove around them, could be wrong
Here is the power strap
http://www.easycareinc.com/our_boots...oot_glove.aspx

Yes, guess they did discontinue the production of the glove itself, as I thought, although some stock remains

The Easyboot Backcountry is built on the glove, and obviously, because the gloves by themselves, do not stay on well, when going gets tough

http://www.easycareinc.com/our_boots...ckcountry.aspx

Last edited by Smilie; 11-29-2016 at 01:02 PM.
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post #17 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 01:11 PM
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Oh no. Gloves are not discontinued and never will be. They are easycare owner's and the public's favorite easycare boot.

I used the powerstrap in the past. It is only needed with a long toe or the wrong size boot.

Nice picture of the buckles on the Renegades. I considered doing that when I had Renegades. I have put D-Ring buckles on the gloves when the Velcro becomes shaky.

Agreed that boots are for good on trail footing. Hondo was so much better with the Ground Controls in confidence. He studies the ground much more closely when negotiating difficult obstacles with boots. The Ground Controls really helped get Hondo's foot in better balance with a set back break over. But they just cover a lot of the foot and until he is 100% free any and all possible infections no matter how slight he will be barefoot.

That said, he is getting stronger and stronger barefoot and may still become a barefoot rock crusher. Hope hope.
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post #18 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 02:18 PM
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Not wanting to see an "are they" or "are they not" discontinued debate, I just now called EasyCare.

They are, indeed, still making the original Gloves but they have upgraded the gator insert.
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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #19 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 02:19 PM Thread Starter
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Well, I've been watching videos all morning and reading more and more. It's overwhelming.

Hondo, it seems the Gloves don't have drainage holes for water or sandy grit that can accumulate. Has that been a problem for you? I am intrigued by the newer Gloves and especially the Backcountry. I had to laugh watching the video of applying the boot. When I was using the Renegades, Dutch would let me apply the boot, then tap his toe on the ground once or twice, then he would actually slide his foot into it, toe first and rest his heel where it belonged. Kinda like stepping into our slippers. Lol. Such a good boy. Idk. Maybe I'll end up with the Renegades again. I was just looking for something simpler. I will say that if I decide on the Easyboot anything I will get the fit kit for sure.

Does anyone have any input as for a simple light "slipper" to use in the pasture while I'm messing around with all these measurements and waiting for shipping?
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post #20 of 94 Old 11-29-2016, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue View Post

Does anyone have any input as for a simple light "slipper" to use in the pasture while I'm messing around with all these measurements and waiting for shipping?
There are no light slippers for a horse with sole issues, lollol

I have both EasyCare Clouds and the EasyCare Rx.

My preference is the Clouds because:

1. The pads that come with the Clouds do not crush down like the pads that come with the "Rx".

2. The Rx are a tighter fit than the Clouds and Joker still flipped one completely backward, doing nothing more than walking around the yard.
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A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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