What is it w/Drafts & purposeful pancake feet? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 03:01 PM Thread Starter
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Question What is it w/Drafts & purposeful pancake feet?

Some people say it's bad genetics or unknowingly bad hoof care....
But now I've found people who do it 100% on purpose...

Is this normal? Is this acceptable? A common ill thought out practice?

I can't tell if they have bad legs from the bad feet or because of genetics, but wow, some have the worst toe out I ever thought possible. Some have each foot going in a different direction.

And the flare, totally random directions, crazy long toes. They look like they are melting and spreading out every which way.

I cropped pictures, but don't think it would be right to share them.

So, draft/pulling horse experts, what say you? What should a healthy, proper foot look like on these types of horses?

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post #2 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 05:11 PM
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draft feet pancake out when the are neglected. They tend to be 'flat ' footed . If you want to see what good draft feet look like, google draft horse shows. Those horses usually have very nice feet.
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post #3 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 05:12 PM
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Draft horses are a kind of horse, and horse's hooves should look like.... horses hooves! They are built and function the same way as any ungulate's hoof. Are subject to the same pressures & distortions when they're not managed well.

While I do believe it's vastly more about 'deed' than 'breed' - environmental factors, rather than genetics are the major influence on any hooves - drafties, arabs and standardbreds are among the breeds which innately tend to have better, stronger feet. So it should be easier getting/retaining healthy, well functioning hooves on them.

Unfortunately, drafties, who people generally realise don't mature until 'late' are often neglected for longer in their early years. Combined with the normal trimming only 6-8 weekly, combined with a drafty generally being a lot more work for a farrier, even if they are well maintained - & too many aren't & many farriers are too lazy to do a good job - which is too little for most horses, their feet are then 'prone' to flaring, cracking, 'dropped' flat soles, etc.

I'd hazard a guess that these people you speak of just have no clue how to rehabilitate deformed feet, or perhaps even as to what hooves are meant to look like. Possibly they've been ill advised by some... ill advised farrier. So they're using the excuse - or spouting someone else's excuse - that they're doing it on purpose.
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Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #4 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 05:32 PM
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any big heavy horse is more prone to flatter feet. I had a foundation quarter mare, she was short stocky bull dog type and had terribly flat feet. To make her not flat footed would have been to tamper with the natural foot angle , letting her heel grow to a higher than normal length.
I do agree a lot of farriers are fast with drafts feet, simply because the horses are so heavy, it is difficult to hold up that hoof. The drafts I have and kept here, would only stand 3 legged for a short time. Farriers used hoof stands to help hold the weight.
I have fired more than one farrier for doing a poor job on the draft mixes, and had farriers trim once, and say they would never do them again .
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post #5 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 05:47 PM
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In draft shows, some of the in hand classes judge the overall health and appearance of the horse. That included the hooves. Back when, a good using horse had big strong hooves, so people saw that big feet were winning and tried to artificially give their horses bigger feet though trimming, instead of what was healthy for that one horse.

That's one reason that was explained to me.
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post #6 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 06:13 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenson View Post
draft feet pancake out when the are neglected. They tend to be 'flat ' footed . If you want to see what good draft feet look like, google draft horse shows. Those horses usually have very nice feet.
The feet I'm talking about are all very glammed up show horses, most pulling in large teams. Rest of the body looks very well groomed and fussed over, but the feet are terrible, with some also having crazy legs.

=/

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post #7 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 06:21 PM Thread Starter
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Searching around, I found where they said they let the foot flair out on purpose. They only rasp the bottom a little and add these giant square shoes. Said that the flairs help the sole be larger and touch more of the ground, which is needed for pulling. That the sole is what they stand on and what they need to use to move loads.


Thanks all!

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post #8 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 08:37 PM
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I'm going to assume you mean these feet:


THIS makes me SO angry. Being someone who comes from a working draft background, these feet are totally unacceptable. There's no way a horse like that could work on anything but sand and not trip over his own feet. We always kept our horses toes short. Their pulling power does not come from the feet.
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post #9 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 08:54 PM
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Agree that correct hoof care and parameters are universal, and if you read some of Pete Ramey's work, including the rehabilitation of some feet on draft horses, he blows that incorrect assumption out of the water, far as it is 'normal' for draft horses to have pan cake feet that flare.
The same type of mis guided logic is applied to TBs, far as them having long toes naturally and poor feet. TBs are often shod on purpose with long toes, to increase break over time, with the idea that then lenghtens stride, and thus speed
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post #10 of 28 Old 01-22-2017, 09:07 PM
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Here is a link to a farrier journal article that describes, and explains, the different shoeing styles used on drafts.

https://www.americanfarriers.com/art...n-be-rewarding

They don't do it randomly, or to be mean, or to get something the horse can't otherwise do. They use different methods for different work.
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