Whiteline disease - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 27Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 15 Old 06-08-2020, 06:21 AM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,636
• Horses: 0
I cannot get any of the horse-specific products (non-horsey country, there aren't any tack shops). I tried ordering it but import of "chemicals" is incredibly difficult for a regular person.

People around here have been using "blue stone" (copper sulfate) to treat hoof issues. It's usually used in vineyards as a fungicide. Has anyone heard of it? Any drawbacks to that?

I can also get my hands on ClO2 (Chlorine dioxide), which is the active ingredient in White Lightning. I would be a bit hesitant to use that because I am not sure that the proportion in the solution should be. Any ideas?

My mare has it in one hoof, not extensively. It's not too deep either, less than a centimeter. The farrier isn't overly worried. He said to use a "blue stone" solution but he thinks it is't necessary. Regardless - I want it gone as soon as possible.

I am not too sure how she developed it. She never stands in anything wet. The stalls are cleaned three times a day and turnout is limited to dry weather.
carshon likes this.
Horsef is offline  
post #12 of 15 Old 06-08-2020, 07:24 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 9,101
• Horses: 0
1. I forgot what country you live in:(. Are you in Canada?

If so - https://canadianforge.com/products/gc-white-lightening

2. Copper crystals (blue powder) can also be used.

3. Another thought, even if your horse is barefoot, would be if your farrier hot shoes. If so, and IF your horse will tolerate the searing smoke (not all horses will), ask you farrier if he will heat up a shoe and use it to cauterize the whiteline. The put a topical treatment on it - whatever you can buy locally may work:)
Horsef likes this.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
walkinthewalk is offline  
post #13 of 15 Old 06-08-2020, 07:06 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 21,780
• Horses: 0
Bluestone(copper sulfate) is good. Doesn't work for every infection but helps most IME. It's strong & toxic & best not get it on your hands, or any skin of the horse. Straight salt is pretty good too. Chlorine dioxide is apparently good too, but afraid I haven't used it & can't tell you how to mix. I'm sure if you google... I'd scrape/cut out the infection as much as necessary, then, depending the environment & size of hole(it's generally best left open to air, but...), you could either plug it up - you can use clay(I use Tuff Rock clay poultice) or beeswax & mix it with CS or such, or you could make a paste to put in the hole, or soak the foot in a solution, then leave it open.

Infections like this(& thrush - same beasts) are from soil born organisms. They are classed as 'opportunistic', meaning they tend to invade compromised tissue. Once in though, they can eat further into healthy wall material. It can be insidious & unseen, inside the hoof capsule, so I believe any infection is best scraped/cut out as necessary, as well as treated topically. They're anaerobic - reason to have it open to air if poss - and like warmth & damp. Inside the wall material can be damp enough even if the environment's dry, so mud & crud is not strictly necessary - just that that compromises the hoof more & so gives the 'opportunistic' infection more chances to thrive.
Horsef likes this.
loosie is offline  
post #14 of 15 Old 06-08-2020, 08:11 PM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,636
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
1. I forgot what country you live in:(. Are you in Canada?

If so - https://canadianforge.com/products/gc-white-lightening

2. Copper crystals (blue powder) can also be used.

3. Another thought, even if your horse is barefoot, would be if your farrier hot shoes. If so, and IF your horse will tolerate the searing smoke (not all horses will), ask you farrier if he will heat up a shoe and use it to cauterize the whiteline. The put a topical treatment on it - whatever you can buy locally may work:)
Sorry, I am not the OP. I was being rude and piggybacked on someone elseís thread - I felt it would fit in here. Apologies if it was against the rules.

I am from Serbia.

Thank you for your advice.
loosie and walkinthewalk like this.
Horsef is offline  
post #15 of 15 Old 06-08-2020, 08:19 PM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,636
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Bluestone(copper sulfate) is good. Doesn't work for every infection but helps most IME. It's strong & toxic & best not get it on your hands, or any skin of the horse. Straight salt is pretty good too. Chlorine dioxide is apparently good too, but afraid I haven't used it & can't tell you how to mix. I'm sure if you google... I'd scrape/cut out the infection as much as necessary, then, depending the environment & size of hole(it's generally best left open to air, but...), you could either plug it up - you can use clay(I use Tuff Rock clay poultice) or beeswax & mix it with CS or such, or you could make a paste to put in the hole, or soak the foot in a solution, then leave it open.

Infections like this(& thrush - same beasts) are from soil born organisms. They are classed as 'opportunistic', meaning they tend to invade compromised tissue. Once in though, they can eat further into healthy wall material. It can be insidious & unseen, inside the hoof capsule, so I believe any infection is best scraped/cut out as necessary, as well as treated topically. They're anaerobic - reason to have it open to air if poss - and like warmth & damp. Inside the wall material can be damp enough even if the environment's dry, so mud & crud is not strictly necessary - just that that compromises the hoof more & so gives the 'opportunistic' infection more chances to thrive.

Thank you.

Itís the weirdest thing. Iíve had my mare at this yard for four years and none of the horses ever had any issues with it. All of a sudden most of them are getting it. None of the day to day routines were changed. Same farrier for a very long time...really strange. I guess the organism could have invaded the area without us doing anything. Maybe it got here with their bedding or hay. I suppose weíll never know and it doesnít matter in any case.
loosie, walkinthewalk and carshon like this.
Horsef is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome