Blanketed Horse Pooping on Himself - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 01-20-2020, 09:29 PM Thread Starter
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Blanketed Horse Pooping on Himself

I have two horses. One is a QH/Mustang mare (9 yrs) and the old gelding (30+) is an Arab. They both wear the same brand/style blanket. The mare never has this problem. The old boy, he of the high-flung tail, just can't seem to avoid getting manure on himself. I clean him at least twice a day. He doesn't seem to have this problem in the summer. The blanket fits perfectly and there is plenty of room for him to raise his tail; in fact he is perfectly capable of raising it when he is just excited and running around. Is there a solution for this problem or just something we have to live with?
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post #2 of 14 Old 01-20-2020, 09:31 PM
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I'm going to follow this because I've never seen a horses with that problem. Granted, horses aren't blanketed very often in my world.

Does he need a cutaway opening for his tail?
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post #3 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:41 AM
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I cut out that tail cover thing. Had that problem and that's how I solved it.

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, it's because your tactics suck. ~ Marine 1SGT J. Reifinger
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post #4 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:55 AM
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If your blanket has a tail flap it is restricting his ability to raise his tail over his back quick enough, hence a poopy butt.
If this is a t/o style I would be hesitant to cut off the flap completely but I might snip the sides some so it not be so "fitted"...
Realize when a horse is pooping they also raise their backs and fill the outline of the blanket far more than when they are galloping around in a field blanketed.
Filling the outline, how the blanket is cut may also restrict just enough the horse can't raise their tail...
Try snipping carefully about half that tail-flap length and see if that works yet still give winde protection to the animal from cold breeze up the tush happening...brrr.
...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #5 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 11:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverDullRanch View Post
I have two horses. One is a QH/Mustang mare (9 yrs) and the old gelding (30+) is an Arab. They both wear the same brand/style blanket. The mare never has this problem. The old boy, he of the high-flung tail, just can't seem to avoid getting manure on himself. I clean him at least twice a day. He doesn't seem to have this problem in the summer. The blanket fits perfectly and there is plenty of room for him to raise his tail; in fact he is perfectly capable of raising it when he is just excited and running around. Is there a solution for this problem or just something we have to live with?
Is the manure formed like normal? At 30 it is likely to be a digestion problem rather than a blanket problem.

There is a long time member with this problem, you might get some info that helps if you read the thread.

Here is the link https://www.horseforum.com/horse-hea...-again-811471/
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post #6 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 08:51 PM
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I would not cut or otherwise alter tail flap on blanket. You cut off both sides of it. It's going to come apart in time there is pipping or whatever along the edges of tail flap.

It will fray tear all along where it was cut. My gelding has poop in his tail on his legs. He's blanketed with a turnout blanket. I wouldn't even consider altering tail flap.

I'll wash him off daily if need be,but not cutting up tail flaps on my blankets.
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post #7 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 10:34 AM
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If you do decide to cut away the tail flap, you can use a match or lighter to "fix" the polyester/nylon threads along the piping so it doesn't ravel. Just run it carefully along the edge until the threads are sealing; you can tell because then they become hard to the touch.
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post #8 of 14 Old 03-06-2020, 12:29 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks, everyone, for the suggestions - I checked out the link that AnitaAnne suggested and I think it offered an explanation. It seems to be SEASONAL (!) and that seems to be very much the case with my old horse. I've only owned him for a couple of years and I guess I just didn't notice or worry over it before. I'll wait until the grass comes back and see if that makes a difference. His front teeth are very delicate - he's lost one already - so this winter I have fed him alfalfa/timothy pellets and he seems to be doing well on that. But the pelleted feed probably has something to do with "The runs" too.
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post #9 of 14 Old 03-06-2020, 07:39 AM
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Hi! I'm the "longtime member" @AnitaAnne referred to :)

Yes, my horse gets loose stool every winter, and it is much worse when he has to wear a blanket. He can't raise his tail quite as much as when he's naked.

The diarrhea went away with an antibiotic treatment called Metronidazole, but then it came back and we had to repeat the treatment. So far, he's back to normal, but it may return again, at which point I probably won't re-treat. I really don't like the idea of giving him all those antibiotics, but at the same time, he can't be absorbing a lot of nutrients when he has liquid poop. It's a balancing act. I will be satisfied with some improvement, and spring is on the way.

So tuck that in the back of your mind if your horse should continue to have this problem or if it gets worse. Before you resort to Metronidazole, however, I'd suggest probiotics. Sometimes that's enough. I had good luck with Bioequine's Digestive Supplement. Slippery elm bark has also helped my horse. The problem is that it would never completely go away, and got really bad this past winter. But he's an extreme case.

Another thing you can try with an aging horse that does better on grass than hay is steaming the hay. My horse loves steamed hay, and it makes the hay a lot more tender and full of water, much like grass. It requires some work, but you can make your own hay steamer out of a garbage can with lid and a humidifier. You just build a rack that sits over the humidifier and let the hay steam for about 45 minutes before you feed. It's not ideal for me because my horses live together in a herd so I'd have to steam everyone's hay. But if you can do it, it does help.

Good luck!
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post #10 of 14 Old 03-06-2020, 01:19 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks!

ALL great ideas! He doesn't eat much hay because of his teeth, which is why he gets pelleted feed (soaked). But I'll try the supplement you suggested. He is in much better shape than when he arrived a couple of years ago...I clean his bottom twice a day (or more) which he seems to appreciate (!) and it isn't difficult because there isn't that much poo and it's dried by the time I encounter it. He's doing it with or without a blanket...it just cruds up the blanket which has to be as annoying to him as it is to me but I don't want to cut off the flap as we live on a very windy hill.

Steaming the hay wouldn't do much for him, I'm afraid, as he just nibbles at it and pushes it around. He does much better with the soaked pellets. And of course the fact they they are soaked is probably contributing to the overly-moist stools. Oy. ☹
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