Advice on hooves please! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 42 Old 08-20-2011, 08:34 PM Thread Starter
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the crack on the hoof is almost like a cross... going in both directions in the middle of the foot.
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post #12 of 42 Old 08-20-2011, 11:38 PM Thread Starter
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I thought I would add in that I rode her again today and there were no signs of lameness or being ouchie at all.
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post #13 of 42 Old 08-20-2011, 11:46 PM
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That's good.

Keep her feet done every 4 weeks then her feet won't have big changes to make.

As far as the crack goes see if you can get that toe a little more relieve.
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post #14 of 42 Old 08-21-2011, 12:01 AM Thread Starter
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I will definitely ask him about getting the toe more relief. He said next time he is out he wants to seal the crack to give it a chance to grow out. Thoughts on doing that?

Based on my pictures, you would definitely say its clubbed not foundered, correct?
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post #15 of 42 Old 08-21-2011, 12:12 AM
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Yes a club foot.

The more toe relief you get the quicker that crack will grow out as there won't be as much pressure on the toe wall.

Also clips can be very helpful, they need be in toe quarter area that will help hold the crack together normally in between the first and second nail hole, sometimes right in front of the first nail hole depends on the nail pattern in the shoe.

Don't have the clips back along the side of the foot any further than that or you are better of with no clips for a club foot.
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post #16 of 42 Old 08-21-2011, 12:30 AM Thread Starter
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He said he wanted to put some sort of mesh on the cracks then some sort of putty to seal it. I will be sure to mention the clips to him.

I will also be seeking out a second opinion from another farrier considering mine has worked with the horse for a while and still didnt know if it was clubbed or foundered.

I have never had a horse with a clubbed foot before. Are there any limitations for her physically as far as riding, jumping, competeing, etc?
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post #17 of 42 Old 08-21-2011, 12:47 AM
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No she should be fine you will have to get her feet done more often so there isn't a big change in the leg and foot.

Watch her knee bones try n keep those even with one another in hieghts.

I used to shoe a saddlebred with a severe club foot that was shown successfully till the owner sold it.

We had to add more wieght on the club foot than we did on the other side to get the horse to pick the feet up the same hieghts.

That's why most horses with a club foot short step a little bit on that side because a club foot is a tad bit lighter than the normal foot.

Good Luck.
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post #18 of 42 Old 08-21-2011, 12:58 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you so much for all the advice and info!!! It is greatly greatly appreciated! It feels nice to actually have a good idea of what is going on with my girl compared to how I felt after the farrier visit.
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post #19 of 42 Old 08-21-2011, 01:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anvil View Post
Hey Mark I'm back.

I realize your concern of pull on the DDFT, but you also need to keep slight tension on the DDFT in my opinion.

what I see happening if you don't keep tension the DDFT contracts more and more and so do the heels.
No disrespect but it's not a matter of opinion. It's a matter of anatomical science.

Unlike the muscle tissue they are attached to, tendons don't "contract". The expression "contracted tendon" is a misnomer. In a congenital case of club foot, the musculature/tendon flexor apparatus is functionally shortened, hence the tension imbalance. Tendons have a "rest" state and a "working" state, not a "contracted" state.

The difference is a matter of parallel collagen fibers that, as compared to muscle tissue, react slowly to electric impulses and are already in a coiled state. At best, there is the slightest amount of stretch to tendon tissue but, no contraction.

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Also if you don't trim to make the knees even heights you will have problems there and shoulder issues.

The club footed side is always higher in the knee than the other side.
No sir; a horse presenting a unilateral club foot condition will present a leg length disparity that is "functionally" shorter on the club side; hence the physiologic reserve response that results in the accelerated heel growth .

Trimming the club footed heel down further will increase stress on the DDFT and subsequent pull on the distal phalanx. That pull on the coffin bone increases strain on the interdigital laminae and pressure on the solar corium, compromising the vascular bed in the anterior of the foot, resulting in the thin soles so common in a club foot.

Don't misunderstand. I'm not suggesting that a farrier leave excess heel on the club foot. Excess heel length is causal in contracted heel distortion, to frog tissue atrophy and increased risk of fungal/bacterial intrusion of those then compromised tissues. Trim the heels to healthy, strong horn with an eye towards passive frog engagement, but then follow up by restoring elevation via orthotics to assure correct mechanical function.

On the surface it appears contradictory. We trim the heels down/back, only to raise them back up again via wedging, but by doing so, we increase the base of support, reduce DDFT pull and passively engage the frog.

It has been observed that managing a clubbed foot shares some protocol aspects common to treating a laminitic. There is considerable truth in that observation.

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I do agree beveling the shoe at the toe relieves more pressure on the DDFT, also a properly fitted straight bar shoe helps heel support.
You must have misunderstood me. I said that rolling the toe will ease breakover; not that beveling the shoe will reduce pressure on the DDFT. One has nothing to do with the other.

Elevation (+/-) effects DDFT/SDFT/Interosseus tension. Easing breakover reduces ground reaction force at the distal margin of the wall/toe structures.

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What is more uncomfortable for a horse some pull on the DDFT or uneven knees which also has to push up on the shoulder ?
There is no reason for the horse to suffer discomfort for either condition. Trim the feet to capsule conformation and apply orthotic wedges as appropriate to compensate for increased DDFT pull and limb length disparity. In this case, you can have your cake and eat it too.

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I can't see how you can be even close with having the knees level and the same heights with 1 degree higher wedge pad on the club foot versus the foot on the other side, but if that works for you, I'm hats off to you, because every farrier has their own opinion and ways of doing stuff, they all have a right to do so as far as I'm aware of.
I make considerable effort to avoid personal opinion and focus more on anatomical mechanics to address the needs of the horse. In some cases (mild club), evenly applied wedging works fine. In more severe cases it may be necessary to adjust/vary caudal elevation to assure bilateral balance.

By the way, I didn't say a 1 degree higher wedge pad. Wedge pads are typically offered as a #1, #2 or #3 product. The nomenclature is typically not a measure of angle.

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Not wanting to start a debate.
I was just stating what works for me.
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Debate can be educational. What "works" should always be viewed with a critical eye, particularly given that some horses appear to get along alright in spite of our efforts, not because of them.

Cheers,
Mark
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post #20 of 42 Old 08-21-2011, 01:33 AM
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Originally Posted by loveyourhorse View Post
hopefully these pics are good enough, if not i will try again! the last picture is just so you can see the size difference between her two front feet. the rings around the top are sweat marks from her bell boots.
Photos are fine.

The vertical crack appears old and generally closed. With proper hoof care, it should grow out in the coming months.

The horizontal crack does not look like an old abscess. While it may have been a metabolic episode originating at the coronary (growth ring), it appears more to be a stress crease in the wall that is part and parcel of the long term distortion of the hoof capsule.

The second photo tells the story. It's a grade 2 club foot with dorsal wall distortion (dishing). The current shoeing protocol will not influence a healthier growth pattern beyond what you see at this time.

D/P balance around COA isn't bad but I'd want to see more expansion in the heel quarters. This shoeing is more of a "hunter fit".

The full pad provides two advantages. Protection of the solar tissues and possibly some passive support of the frog, dependent upon any packing he may have used. If he used no packing, the heel length will probably reduce/negate frog stimulation and the pad will create more of an anaerobic environment conducive to opportunistic bacteria/fungus.

Your farrier likes a tight fit. Is there some concern/history of this horse pulling shoes? The dorsal view of the right front doesn't really tell me much. No obvious capsular distortion or coronary jamming.

No reason to expect that the two front feet will ever look like a matched pair. The right front is the more normal of the two; the left is a club and will always be rather "boxy" and more upright. You can manage it but you cannot fix it.


Cheers,
Mark
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