Assembling A Horse First Aid Kit - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 01-16-2018, 01:51 PM Thread Starter
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Assembling A Horse First Aid Kit

Im just working on assembling a first aid kit for my new horse before he comes home, and I was curious what things you guys like to have in yours
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post #2 of 17 Old 01-16-2018, 02:26 PM
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My "kit" has grown over the years and with each ailment presented...
But basics....

Telephone numbers of several vets to reach in case you need them ASAP
Sterile gauze pads, 3"x 3" & 4" x 4"
Some sort of antiseptic ointment
A wound drying powder {powder or spray}
Scissor, blunt and pointed
Tweezers
Vet wrap
Cling wrap
Saran wrap
Duct tape, a roll of it.
Thermometer and learn how to read it if not digital
Fly spray...amazing how pesky those buggars are when a injury occurs.
Aspirin/Tylenol for me and band-aids.

I have a lot more than this but these are basics immediately come to mind...
...
jmo...
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post #3 of 17 Old 01-16-2018, 04:19 PM
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Disinfectant

Adding on to these basics I also keep a bottle of betadine for cleaning wounds and multiple rags for stopping bleeding before wrapping and such

Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
My "kit" has grown over the years and with each ailment presented...
But basics....

Telephone numbers of several vets to reach in case you need them ASAP
Sterile gauze pads, 3"x 3" & 4" x 4"
Some sort of antiseptic ointment
A wound drying powder {powder or spray}
Scissor, blunt and pointed
Tweezers
Vet wrap
Cling wrap
Saran wrap
Duct tape, a roll of it.
Thermometer and learn how to read it if not digital
Fly spray...amazing how pesky those buggars are when a injury occurs.
Aspirin/Tylenol for me and band-aids.

I have a lot more than this but these are basics immediately come to mind...
...
jmo...
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post #4 of 17 Old 01-16-2018, 04:27 PM
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I like to keep a tube of Banamine on hand. It does expire eventually so it will be need to be replaced and kept up-to-date, but in the event you need Banamine NOW (such as a colicing horse) and it's after hours, you want to have one on hand.

Other medications usually aren't as emergency and I can pick up in town or get from the vet.

I've had way too many horse injuries in the past so I have a very good supply of:
-vet wrap
-cotton wrap
-quilted padding
-elasticon (so awesome for keeping leg bandages up)
-duct tape (also good for keeping leg bandages up)
-silver sulfadiazine wound ointment
-prouds off wound ointment
-Betadine
-sharp regular scissors and bandaging scissors
-razor blade (good for cutting bandage supplies .... or cleaning up tissue around a wound)
-gauze pad
-maxi pads or diapers (work great for large wounds)
-thermometer
-empty large syringes (if I need to force-feed a powder anti-biotic, or something of that nature for a picky eater)
-paper towels
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post #5 of 17 Old 01-17-2018, 12:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluetheapha View Post
Im just working on assembling a first aid kit for my new horse before he comes home, and I was curious what things you guys like to have in yours
You you asking as to what supplies to just have on hand, at home, or a first aid kit to take trail riding?
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post #6 of 17 Old 01-17-2018, 12:26 AM
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just a note, far as Banamine and colic, which I think, needs to be empathized.
I don't keep it on hand for colic, as the equine vet I use, plus some others, do not want ahorse treated with apain reliever until the type of colic is diagnosed
Others will give the nod to a single does of Banamine, which works well for gas colic.
However, giving repeat doses can hide the fact that an impaction colic is becoming worse, going from one that is medically treatable to one that becomes a surgical one.
I do keep some castor oil on hand for impaction colic, and if that does not resolve it, the horse gets tubed by the vet.
Just did not wish to have someone relatively new to horses, to think that Banamine cures colic

A Cautionary Note About Banamine and Colic
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post #7 of 17 Old 01-17-2018, 12:29 AM
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Another source:

'Resist the Temptation to Medicate
It is often tempting to give a colicky horse a dose of flunixin meglumine (Banamine) or phenylbutazone paste (bute). This is not necessarily a good idea without first conferring with your vet, for many reasons:

Oral medication is poorly absorbed from the intestines in a horse with compromised gut motility, as is often the case with colic. Even under normal circumstances, oral medications require several hours to be absorbed and begin working. An oral dose is less likely to help with immediate colic pain, and once given, it interferes with both a veterinarian’s assessment and the ability to administer this medication intravenously to provide immediate pain relief.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) may significantly mask symptoms of a surgical problem, thereby delaying appropriate treatment. These medications can create kidney function problems and/or gastric ulcers in a dehydrated horse.

Injectable flunixin meglumine given intramuscularly has been known to create Clostridia infection within the muscles, causing life-threatening consequences. In addition, many horse owners are unaware that the label dose of flunixin meglumine is twice the amount that should be given to a colicky horse—such a large dose is able to mask a surgical condition for as much as half a day. This could delay appropriate medical intervention and reduce the horse’s chances for survival.

The Truth about Colic
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post #8 of 17 Old 01-17-2018, 04:22 AM
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It's still good to have oral Banamine on hand. But also call your vet immediately. If he says to give Banamine you can go ahead and not wait for him. It really does depend on the type of colic. Also the vet will use diagnostic techniques that aren't masked by Banamine. It is true however that a very novice horse owner might be fooled into thinking a serious colic was resolved when it wasn't.
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post #9 of 17 Old 01-17-2018, 05:23 AM
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One thing I really like to have is a bottle of spray saline/wound wash. It can really help you see how deep a wound is or if some little piece of matter is skin or dirt, etc. Since it's colorless it is better than betadine for visualizing. It's less forceful and easier to get close to the wound than a hose.
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post #10 of 17 Old 01-17-2018, 09:26 AM
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@Blue thealpha have you taken an equine first aid course yet? That's probably the most important thing to put in your "kit"! :)
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