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post #1 of 12 Old 10-15-2019, 06:53 PM Thread Starter
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Fancy that!

Just read an article on FB about 'treatment' for dummy foals... Wonder if Temple Grandin had anything to do with development of the technique... Pic shows the foal lying down with a sort of wide, tight halter, bandage around it's neck, rope around the girth & chest, with someone hanging off the rope to keep it tight.


From Newcastle Equine Centre;

Recently, our internal medicine team at NEC was presented with a foal showing classic signs of neonatal maladjustment syndrome (a.k.a. dummy foal syndrome) where it was very detached, had no desire to nurse and was becoming very weak as a result. A nasogastric tube was placed so the foal could be tube fed and he was started on broad spectrum antimicrobials to protect him from infection since he had not received the essential colostrum from its mum. Once the foal was stabilized, the Madigan Squeeze Technique was performed which can be seen in the first picture.

The foal remained in the squeeze position for 20 minutes, then woke up as the squeeze was released, within 2 hours of the squeeze technique being performed the foal was suddenly very bright with a strong affinity for its mum, and nursing! See the video in the comments!

For more information on neonatal maladjustment syndrome and the Madigan Squeeze Technique, give the article by Dr. Lisanne Gallant a read by tapping on the link below.

https://www.newcastleequinecentre.ne...-foal-nursinů/

Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #2 of 12 Old 10-15-2019, 07:00 PM
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I have seen the Madigan Squeeze used with great success twice. In both cases, the foal was tightly wrapped with a rope, pressure applied for 20 minutes or so, then released, and both recovered and were 'normal' within a few hours. Once it was done by a vet, once by the farm owner after a Google search for what may be wrong with her foal.
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post #3 of 12 Old 10-15-2019, 07:17 PM
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Amazing! Thanks for sharing that research.
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post #4 of 12 Old 10-15-2019, 08:01 PM
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@loosie , yes that does sound like something Twmple Grandin may have added some input :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
I have seen the Madigan Squeeze used with great success twice. In both cases, the foal was tightly wrapped with a rope, pressure applied for 20 minutes or so, then released, and both recovered and were 'normal' within a few hours. Once it was done by a vet, once by the farm owner after a Google search for what may be wrong with her foal.
ok, this inquiring mind wants to know if you bad the chance to see either of these foals as they grew?

I am wondering about oxygen loss, even for a few second, and how that may have affected either foal.

Maybe unexplained quirks, temper tantrums, or a slowness to understand and perform a simple task?

I have seen first hand the results of oxygen loss to the brain in a foal but it was due to the foal not being able to break out of the sack. It left the foal one flake short if a full bale of hay and with a nasty off/on temper that did not come from any of its family.
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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #5 of 12 Old 10-15-2019, 08:06 PM
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Univ. of Calif. at Davis has done a lot of research on this.


https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/newborn...-clues-autism/
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post #6 of 12 Old 10-15-2019, 10:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
Univ. of Calif. at Davis has done a lot of research on this.


https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/newborn...-clues-autism/
THAT is one of the best and most interesting credible reads I have seen.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #7 of 12 Old 10-15-2019, 11:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
@loosie , yes that does sound like something Twmple Grandin may have added some input :)



ok, this inquiring mind wants to know if you bad the chance to see either of these foals as they grew?

I am wondering about oxygen loss, even for a few second, and how that may have affected either foal.

Maybe unexplained quirks, temper tantrums, or a slowness to understand and perform a simple task?

I have seen first hand the results of oxygen loss to the brain in a foal but it was due to the foal not being able to break out of the sack. It left the foal one flake short if a full bale of hay and with a nasty off/on temper that did not come from any of its family.
From what I understand, being a dummy foal is not the result from lack of oxygen during birth. They are now thinking that neurosteroids that are elevated in utero and the pressure of the birth canal signals these neurosteroids to decrease after birth. Apparently this squeeze mimics that.

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post #8 of 12 Old 10-16-2019, 01:38 AM
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well, my son , who was born ceasarean, is on the autistic spectrum


I 'm sure it is just too easy to make the assumption that there is necessarily a connection.
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post #9 of 12 Old 10-16-2019, 07:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
well, my son , who was born ceasarean, is on the autistic spectrum


I 'm sure it is just too easy to make the assumption that there is necessarily a connection.
I don't really think that there is a correlation. The foals born with this syndrome snap out of it on there own within a couple of weeks if given the care to survive. I have not read anything that horses born with Maladjusted foal syndrome having any different behaviors throughout the rest of their lives. It would be nice if it were that easy. I honestly wish that more research would be put into autism as more and more are afflicted with this syndrome.

My nieces middle son is autistic and he didn't show any signs of it until he was two years old.
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post #10 of 12 Old 10-16-2019, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
@loosie , yes that does sound like something Twmple Grandin may have added some input :)



ok, this inquiring mind wants to know if you bad the chance to see either of these foals as they grew?

I am wondering about oxygen loss, even for a few second, and how that may have affected either foal.

Maybe unexplained quirks, temper tantrums, or a slowness to understand and perform a simple task?

I have seen first hand the results of oxygen loss to the brain in a foal but it was due to the foal not being able to break out of the sack. It left the foal one flake short if a full bale of hay and with a nasty off/on temper that did not come from any of its family.
I see one of them weekly. She's a sweet filly who is a total lovebug and totally normal in every way. She's a long 2 y.o. and was started under saddle this fall for a few days (walk, trot, canter, turn, done), and is now turned out to grow up until spring when she'll be pointed toward a ranch/roping career. No problems with her whatsoever. She's a good size, well-proportioned, and as sweet and mellow as her dam.

The other I haven't seen. I don't think it's oxygen deprivation that leads to dummy foals, but is instead due to the lack of pressure from the birth canal in very rapid deliveries or Cesarean births. My friend's filly was born very quickly to an aged mare-- literally in less than 5 minutes. The theory was that she wasn't subjected to the pressures of the birth canal for long enough to shut down the neurosteroids that keep the foal still during the birthing process.
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