Feeding Well But Horse Still Thin - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 31 Old 04-04-2019, 03:54 PM Thread Starter
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I have bought alfalfa to work in as 50% of their daily forage to go along with the coastal, have increased their hay intake and will phase out the sweet feed. Thanks guys! I will post pictures of progress later.

Also, starting to work on our pasture in hopes of growing more grass. Hopefully that will help fill in more on the time between feedings. Wish me luck!
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post #22 of 31 Old 04-04-2019, 04:10 PM
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Let them have all the hay they want if you have the option of putting out a round bale.


Leave the Dumor alone. That two bucks you save vs. Purina isn't worth it. IDC what the nutrition label says. Purina is superior. I'm going to preach the gospel of Purina Senior Feed here - doesn't matter if he's a senior horse or not. You can shovel that to a horse in large quantities to pack on weight and it will not founder them (Unless you let them eat 40lbs in a day - so sayeth my equine vet). I also like Heritage and Shawnee brand feeds - I don't know if they're available in your area.



Top the feed with rice bran (Fat). I know there's some debate on the difference between el cheapo rice bran like you buy to feed deer and horse quality, but vet says otherwise. So long as you can use a 50lb bag up before it gets bugs in it, go for it. It's like 7.99 for 50lbs, so even if it gets gross before you use it all up, toss and it get another bag. It's cheap.



Lastly, and these are new to me:

Protein tubs for horses. DO NOT get the ones formulated for cattle. They're too 'hot' (Too high in protein) and can cause issues. You can get a small one at TSC for 27 bucks and change. They will pack the weight on a horse in no time. I put one out for Outback (Yearling) and Supes (22 years old, dropped a frightening amount of weight at the start of winter due to a botched floating). They share with Trigger - they won't leave it alone. They've nearly wiped it out in a week.



Next week I will be buying the 200llb tubs @ 60.00 ea. It's worth it.

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."
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post #23 of 31 Old 04-04-2019, 08:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
You can shovel that to a horse in large quantities to pack on weight and it will not founder them
Sorry but I have to say that is just wrong & dangerous advice! Firstly 'senior feed' is like saying 'complete feed' - it isn't a specific recipe but can be a wide range of things, depending on the brand. Secondly, it does often have a high carbohydrate level, which can indeed cause IR/laminitis in horses that are sensitive to this. Thirdly, nutritional balance - which is also not the same across the board for 'senior feeds' - can play a big part in 'founder' and many feeds include iron & potassium for eg, which in excess can be problematic there. And then, depending how it's fed, how much, how often, that can cause gut probs which can lead to 'founder' too.

So... I think it is fair to say that there are many 'senior feeds' that are good, and they are often safER, more easily digested, than feeding many other grainy 'hard feeds'.

Quote:
Top the feed with rice bran (Fat). I know there's some debate on the difference between el cheapo rice bran like you buy to feed deer and horse quality, but vet says otherwise.
I have had an equine vet recommend feeding a horse on wheatbix to put weight on. I've had a 'top lameness vet' advise owners to feed an obese donkey on solely lucerne(alfalfa) because it's low sugar... etc. Vets are not always nutritional experts, so I wouldn't just take that on faith because 'experts recommend...'. As for 'el cheapo' rice bran, I don't know about that specifically, but I do know that as a 'byproduct' there may be a lot of floor sweepings included for the price.
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Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #24 of 31 Old 04-04-2019, 11:20 PM
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Pretty sure this vet knows her stuff. I followed her recommendations to put weight on Supes through the winter and it worked. He got a double portion of Purina senior feed, twice a day, plus the rice bran and free choice hay, the very very fine grade alfalfa pellets every other day in addition to the feed.

He's back to looking like his old self again. I will forever recommend Purina senior feed for a horse that needs weight gain.

Can't speak as to the floor sweepings in the cheaper rice bran, but it works, so I've stuck with it.
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post #25 of 31 Old 04-05-2019, 01:13 AM
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Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
Pretty sure this vet knows her stuff. I followed her recommendations to put weight on Supes
Firstly I missed *Purina* feed in your first post - thought we were talking 'senior feed' generically. And maybe your vet was talking about feeding it to your particular horse that you could 'shovel it in' & it would be safe. But it is still 17%NSC which, while lower than many feeds, is not all that low, and even on their site, Purina cautions feeding it to 'carbohydrate sensitive' horses.
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Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #26 of 31 Old 04-06-2019, 08:08 PM
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Considering an acquaintance is currently treating her mare for laminitis after the mare got into the tack room of the trailer and ate about 6 lbs of a new bag of Purina Senior, yes, it can founder a horse... they weighed the bag to find out how much she ate and her vet said not to worry, it wasn't enough to cause a problem. She went out in the middle of the night to a mare in pain with bounding pulses in all four hooves. I am a fan of Purina Senior but it is certainly not something to 'shovel into them' without consequences.
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post #27 of 31 Old 04-08-2019, 02:42 PM Thread Starter
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It's all good! I talked to a a rancher down the road, my farrier and you guys. I have a good thing going now. I am already having a hard time seeing my TBs ribs now. My Walker was fine but he looks even more handsome now.

I feed each horse a flake of alfalfa per day and 15 pounds of hay each. I am weening off the Dumor now and saving the sweet feed as a periodic treat. My neighbor next door also told me I am free to let them mow his yard (scratch my back I scratch yours). So I am going to let them go over for an hour every other day. He used to own them. =)
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post #28 of 31 Old 04-18-2019, 01:49 AM
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I have had some problems with my Arabian like this, beet pulp, alfalfa and oil helps. It is important for horses to slow feed, and if you can't feed more meals in the day you could try a hay net or a slow feeder so that your horse can "graze" throughout the day. A horse is naturally supposed to eat smaller more frequent meals as it is better for the hind-gut.
Another option that Ive heard good things about is something called "G's formula" and was created to save a horse with digestive issues, apparently it is good. You can buy it at Apple Saddlery a Canadian company.
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post #29 of 31 Old 04-18-2019, 07:04 AM
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I don't think adding just one flake of alfalfa per day, and letting them hand-graze for an hour on someone's lawn will do the trick here. I'm in the camp of giving them free choice hay. I get that you're on a budget, but hay is cheaper than feed normally (I guess it varies by region). If you can't get your hands on good hay at a decent price, consider hay cubes (preferably soaked) as a substitute.

Also, do a fecal. It's not hard, you get a stool sample, drive it to your nearest vet lab, and they tell you if there are parasites. Around here, it costs about 20$. When I got a new horse and he colicked within a couple of weeks of being here, we did a fecal sample and he tested at over 400 (anything over 200 should be treated). I think that's why he colicked. I dewormed him immediately. I deworm all three of my horses twice a year systematically, even though the others rarely show any worm counts. You can't tell if a horse has worms just by looking at him.

I do like beet pulp a lot myself so consider that option too. Make sure you get the molasses-free version though.

And if you really can't feed more than twice a day, invest in slow-feeder hay nets with small holes to make it last longer. Horses need forage most of all - it's what they're made to eat, and it keeps them from getting ulcers by keeping their digestive system working at all times. When a horse goes without food for more than a few hours, the acid production in his stomach causes irritation, and eventually, can cause painful ulcers. Unlike us, they cannot shut off their acid production so if there is nothing in the stomach, that acid is just splashing around. I'd follow the recommendations of the folks here - 24 lbs of hay per day, per horse. That's about what I feed mine, along with some beet pulp and hay cubes, and mine are all 14.3 and under!!! 12 lbs is nothing.
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post #30 of 31 Old 04-18-2019, 10:20 AM
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Sweet feed is a big no-no.

Dumor isn't the best quality either. Do you have access to Poulin Grain Fibre Max at all? Really good stuff. Helps their coat as well.
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