Founder-tendencies - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 16Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 20 Old 09-09-2019, 08:43 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Outer Island
Posts: 245
• Horses: 0
I’m realizing that ultimately a grazing muzzle will not work in my situation. The horse is out to pasture 24/7, and when I take the muzzle off, she’ll just make up for the eating she didn’t do when it was on.

I think I’ve basically decided to move her.

Yes, it will make her sad initially. Possibly even despondent.x However, in the long run, she will be much better off if I can have her somewhere where I can limit/control her food intake.

Once I get her comfortable enough to move, it’ll be time to pull off the band aid.
WildestDandelion likes this.
ManicDaisy is offline  
post #12 of 20 Old 09-09-2019, 08:46 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Outer Island
Posts: 245
• Horses: 0
I have a thing about animals in pain. Leaving her in a pretty field with her pretty friend to look pretty is just not worth it if she’s in pain the whole time. 😞

Anyway, yeah thanks for the help. Pretty sure I’ll be angering a host of people by moving her, but...I gotta do what’s best for the horse. Not the humans. 😕
loosie, JCnGrace and rambo99 like this.
ManicDaisy is offline  
post #13 of 20 Old 09-12-2019, 04:59 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 364
• Horses: 2
I've owned a fat horse for many years. It's been a bit of a nightmare through all the moves and everything. This spring, I just bit the bullet and ordered a Greenguard grazing muzzle. It's expensive, and I did NOT want to to do it. I went all in, though, and got the breakaway halter, too. I was tired and willing to do anything not to have the long battle of spring/summer (winter we have figured out as we have a Hay Chix small hole hay net for the round bale).

The GG muzzle is the best thing I've ever done, and I seriously question my mental faculties at not doing this before.

I have tried every cheap muzzle, supplements, dry lotting, whatever. They all worked to varying degrees, but she managed to either A) get it off B) neigh all day and pace from loneliness in the dry lot and start head tossing C) supplements did nothing.

She is in the pasture most of the time, and goes into the lot with her buddy at night. This way, her buddy can get enough to eat as he is not prone to fatness. She gets some TC Lite to cover her nutritional needs (1.5 lbs max a day), and she has never looked so good. I am just floored. No stiff crest, no fatty shoulders.

This is obviously just my story, and anecdotal evidence is just that. But I am just glad I did it. I have worried little to none about her foundering, and I used to stress about it all the time. And the head tossing was just horrible.
ManicDaisy likes this.
2SCHorses is offline  
post #14 of 20 Old 09-12-2019, 11:06 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 493
• Horses: 0
I have two fat mares who wear grazing muzzles 24/7. The muzzles come off while they eat their 1lb of ration balancer a day. That gives me a chance to rinse the muzzles and pick the grass out of the velcro. Then they go right back on. I don't have a dry lot, and I don't want them eating themselves silly overnight.


Oh, I also add salt to their feed since they can't lick the salt block with the muzzles.
ManicDaisy likes this.
mkmurphy81 is offline  
post #15 of 20 Old 09-13-2019, 11:22 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 2,884
• Horses: 0
A horse that is always foot sore is a horse that is chronically foundering. It is not going to take much to put that pony right over the edge into full blown life altering founder. We purchased a mare from this exact type of situation. Huge lush green pasture - always foot sore and a loving owner who did nothing about it. Then BAM she went down one day with founder in all 4 feet - and just could not get up due to the pain. The vet had to give pain meds and beat her to her feet to get her into the owners barn - the owner was told no more full time turn out and she just could not/would not manage the horse and decided to put her up for sale for $500 - this is a horse she had paid $4000 for. We went and looked at her and leased her for a few months while trying to rehab her. This mare is on a pasture for about 6 hours per day very early in the morning wearing a grazing muzzle. She is brought in at noon and given grass hay in a dry lot and is stalled in a small run at night with grass hay in a slow feed net. Managing her weight is very hard as she gets fat on air. Fall is when we tend to see her get a little sore - as the grass stores more sugars in the cool air. We tend to let her have less time out in the fall.

This pony does not look fat at all and I would wonder about Cushings - and would have the pony tested. Cushings can also cause founder.
ManicDaisy likes this.
carshon is online now  
post #16 of 20 Old 09-13-2019, 11:31 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 463
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by ManicDaisy View Post
Yeah, Iíll start with the grazing muzzle and see how it goes. The main things is that if thatís the solution I use, itís a pain in the neck because Iíd have to go out twice a day...once to put it on, once to take it off.

honestly, that just seems like itís not a realistic long-ter, proposition.
this is why we sold our pony. It came to be too much stress. It's good of you to try and help.
WildestDandelion is offline  
post #17 of 20 Old 09-13-2019, 11:49 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: CenTex
Posts: 1,924
• Horses: 0
It's a little hard to tell from the pictures, but that horse doesn't look fat to me.
WildestDandelion likes this.
ACinATX is online now  
post #18 of 20 Old 09-13-2019, 10:56 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Outer Island
Posts: 245
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
It's a little hard to tell from the pictures, but that horse doesn't look fat to me.
She carries her weight a lot better than other horses. LOL. Like, she doesnt look fat from a distance, but if youíre up close you can see that her crest is HUGE, and even has vertical ridges to it.

That said, Iíve been packing her hooves, giving supplements for laminitis, Cushings and metabolism, and hand-walking twice a day...and I feel like she is seeming better already.

The bute is also helping.

Right now, the decision is whether to keep up what Iím doing for a month or two and see if I can get enough improvement to stay the course, or just get her sound enough to move to a field with less grass.

The good/bad thing is that no one has done much of anything (as far as I can tell) to help this situation before.

She hasnít ďfailedĒ a bunch of other treatments.

This is really just a straight-up neglect issue.
ManicDaisy is offline  
post #19 of 20 Old 09-13-2019, 11:00 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Outer Island
Posts: 245
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by carshon View Post
A horse that is always foot sore is a horse that is chronically foundering. It is not going to take much to put that pony right over the edge into full blown life altering founder. We purchased a mare from this exact type of situation. Huge lush green pasture - always foot sore and a loving owner who did nothing about it. Then BAM she went down one day with founder in all 4 feet - and just could not get up due to the pain. The vet had to give pain meds and beat her to her feet to get her into the owners barn - the owner was told no more full time turn out and she just could not/would not manage the horse and decided to put her up for sale for $500 - this is a horse she had paid $4000 for. We went and looked at her and leased her for a few months while trying to rehab her. This mare is on a pasture for about 6 hours per day very early in the morning wearing a grazing muzzle. She is brought in at noon and given grass hay in a dry lot and is stalled in a small run at night with grass hay in a slow feed net. Managing her weight is very hard as she gets fat on air. Fall is when we tend to see her get a little sore - as the grass stores more sugars in the cool air. We tend to let her have less time out in the fall.

This pony does not look fat at all and I would wonder about Cushings - and would have the pony tested. Cushings can also cause founder.
Where I live, its hard to get anything done by a ďprofessionalĒ. So I put her on a bunch of supplements designed for horses with Cushings. (Pituitary support blend, extra chasteberry.)

One of her feet really doesnt grow like it should. Thats the main one with the problem. So I have her on a couple hoof-strengthening formulas.

She doesnt look fat from a distance, but up close you can see her fat pads.
ManicDaisy is offline  
post #20 of 20 Old 09-14-2019, 01:23 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 20,722
• Horses: 0
[quote=ManicDaisy;1970768009]She carries her weight a lot better than other horses. LOL. Like, she doesnt look fat from a distance,[quote]

Yeah, what I'm always telling people - theyre like people & we don't always look the same - I mean, you can see my ribs in some positions bit no one would say I'm ... having a hard season! And just like people, they don't have to be full on oooobese to suffer either.

Quote:
The bute is also helping.
Why the bute?? Without a very good reason(severe pain), I'd quit that yesterday! If she is that sore, you shouldn't be walking her, and you need to treat her situation as an emergency. Also bute & other 'hard on the gut' meds are known to CAUSE acute laminitis, so one huge reason to avoid unless absolutely necessary & give only in the very short term if you must.
loosie is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome