Horse has colic symptoms - only when exercising - The Horse Forum
 5Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 14 Old 01-20-2020, 11:31 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 3
• Horses: 0
Horse has colic symptoms - only when exercising

I'm leasing a 10-year old mare who has always (for two years at least) had some problems with pooping while being ridden, but the problem has gotten worse recently. She sometimes suddenly stops while cantering and puts herself in peeing position without peeing. When she feels like she's going to poop, she gets very tense, lifts her tail up and refuses to move. I have to force her to keep on trotting (otherwise she won't poop), but she gets very annoyed, swishes her tail and seems very uncomfortable. Previously it took just a minute or two for her to finally poop, so this wasn't as big of a problem. Nowadays it can take 15 minutes. After she finally poops she's forward and nice to ride, until she starts the same thing all over again. This happens up to three times during a lesson, and happens also when I lunge her. It's getting to the point where it's impossible to compete her, and very hard to train her. She has no colic symptoms in the stable or outside, and seems to have no problems pooping there. Her poop looks normal, and she seems to be otherwise perfectly healthy.

She's getting 8kg haylage per day (we feed her 5 times a day), and 1 kilo protein pellets (mostly soy protein) divided onto three separate occasions. She maintains a normal weight. We are giving her psyllium (worked very well for a month or so, but stopped working), more water (she drinks poorly so we soak the pellets in lots of water), linseed, and mineral oil. Nothing seems to be working. We thought at first that it's due to her eating mud outside, because there's some grass growing in the mud that she nibbles on all day long. That's why we tried psyllium, which actually helped in the beginning, but doesn't seem to do so anymore.

Has anyone else experienced this, and is there anything we can do? Our vet doesn't understand what's going on either.
henna is offline  
post #2 of 14 Old 01-20-2020, 12:36 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,207
• Horses: 2
Strange problem. I'm interesting to hear more from other members, but as someone who struggles with chronic diarrhea, I can say that feeding slippery elm bark and marshmallow root have helped alleviate the loose stool somewhat in our older gelding, and reduces reactivity working around the girth area in our younger guy. Not sure it will take away her need to poop, but maybe it will soothe her intestine. Glad you have a vet involved, but sadly, they are often stumped by digestive issues.
Acadianartist is online now  
post #3 of 14 Old 01-20-2020, 01:27 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 2,715
• Horses: 0
My first thought was metabolic issues, sugar related problems. Does she have a cresty neck, or an abnoramally heavy coat? Cushings also comes to mind.

I will be interested to see what some of our knowledgeable people on here have to say.
Woodhaven is online now  
post #4 of 14 Old 01-20-2020, 04:15 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 10,829
• Horses: 0
Welcome to the forum!!


Is the horse in your avatar your leased animal?
If so...

Being grey my first thought would be tumors and activity moves the tumors a small bit simulating a need to go feeling in the horse, hence the try and not succeed.
You can't always see tumors, sometimes with a internal you can feel them...but greys are known to have them and they do create all kinds of digestive problems.
From what AA is enduring with her horse and diarrhea to possibly the horse you ride and lease..
From urinary tract to small, large and rectal intestinal tract, each and every part can be laced with tumors creating the need, the urge to move the bowels one way or the other.
Only a vet carefully trained should ever do a rectal exam and or diagnostic evaluation internally from the butt forward...
For animals as large as they are, the walls of the intestine are very fragile and easily torn.
...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is online now  
post #5 of 14 Old 01-20-2020, 06:59 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: middle of nowhere
Posts: 3,901
• Horses: 3
^ My thoughts, too. Prolonged trotting may mean melanomas move around and irritate her. I'd also get a full reproductive exam done on this mare. Ovarian cysts can be extremely painful to horses, and cause colic symptoms.
SilverMaple is offline  
post #6 of 14 Old 01-20-2020, 11:09 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Phoenix Arizona
Posts: 5,269
• Horses: 5
1. how old is she?
2. what breed is she?
3. has she been tested for PSSM? this sounds alot like exercise induced tying up.
AnitaAnne and Acadianartist like this.
KigerQueen is offline  
post #7 of 14 Old 01-21-2020, 06:47 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 3
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodhaven View Post
My first thought was metabolic issues, sugar related problems. Does she have a cresty neck, or an abnoramally heavy coat? Cushings also comes to mind.

I will be interested to see what some of our knowledgeable people on here have to say.
No cresty neck or heavy coat, her neck is very thin actually compared to the rest of her body.

Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Welcome to the forum!!


Is the horse in your avatar your leased animal?
If so...

Being grey my first thought would be tumors and activity moves the tumors a small bit simulating a need to go feeling in the horse, hence the try and not succeed.
You can't always see tumors, sometimes with a internal you can feel them...but greys are known to have them and they do create all kinds of digestive problems.
From what AA is enduring with her horse and diarrhea to possibly the horse you ride and lease..
From urinary tract to small, large and rectal intestinal tract, each and every part can be laced with tumors creating the need, the urge to move the bowels one way or the other.
Only a vet carefully trained should ever do a rectal exam and or diagnostic evaluation internally from the butt forward...
For animals as large as they are, the walls of the intestine are very fragile and easily torn.
...
Yes, she's grey! She has no visible tumors, but could have some internal ones of course. She's quite young, but I guess tumors is still a possibility.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KigerQueen View Post
1. how old is she?
2. what breed is she?
3. has she been tested for PSSM? this sounds alot like exercise induced tying up.
1. She's 10
2. Arab/welsh pony/thoroughbred mix which a bunch of other breeds mixed in too
3. She hasn't been tested, but it seems unlikely considering her breed.

I have been suspecting stomach ulcers, could that be a possibility given her symptoms?
henna is offline  
post #8 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 08:39 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,669
• Horses: 0
Stomach ulcers don't really match the symptoms you are describing. I would have a second vet come look at her. Pssm is possible, so is tying up unrelated to pssm, she could have a sore back or lameness issue and is smart enough to figure that if she parks out, she doesn't have to work.

Please get a video of her displaying the behavior as it can provide extra details we might otherwise miss.
4horses is online now  
post #9 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 04:16 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Phoenix Arizona
Posts: 5,269
• Horses: 5
pssm happens in all breeds including arabs AND Tbs. would be worth looking into.

This sounds alot like your mare. again it is more common in qhs BUT it has been documented in many breeds including arabs and tbs. you could have her tested by animal genetics. its just a hair sample as they are looking at genetic markers.

food for thought. unless she has some sort of bladder stone or a calcium stone.

https://ker.com/equinews/update-pssm-horses/
KigerQueen is offline  
post #10 of 14 Old 01-24-2020, 06:32 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 3
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by KigerQueen View Post
pssm happens in all breeds including arabs AND Tbs. would be worth looking into.

This sounds alot like your mare. again it is more common in qhs BUT it has been documented in many breeds including arabs and tbs. you could have her tested by animal genetics. its just a hair sample as they are looking at genetic markers.

food for thought. unless she has some sort of bladder stone or a calcium stone.

https://ker.com/equinews/update-pssm-horses/
Thank you for the info! I still don't think the symptoms match. She is not shaking, sweating or cramping. No abnormal muscle stiffness. She is simply stiffening her back and sides as a means to try to block leg aids or as if trying to poop - and when she finally does, it helps her, at least for a while. She's always been a very forward horse and doesn't otherwise exhibit unwillingness to exercise. As I said, she's always been a bit weird about pooping, taking a minute or two before she poops. She hasn't had other symptoms previously.

Our vet is still suspecting ulcers and we will begin to treat her with Omeprazole. She has gotten to the point where she refuses to canter, and after riding a few minutes refuses to trot too, which is unlike her. Our vet thinks that if she has ulcers, the stomach acid start to move around when she trots or canters, which makes her exhibit colic symtoms and try to relieve the pain by stopping, putting herself in peeing position or trying to poop even though she doesn't need to. That would also explain why we initially had good results with psyllium. She is also more girthy and sensitive (doesn't like brushing) than usual.

I can't provide a video of her behavior now as we're letting her rest from work for a while. But she's exhibiting various symptoms, now mostly refusing to go forward and tightening her muscles to block my leg aids. This happens after I've been trotting her for a few minutes. On her good days she's more forward, but stops often especially when cantering, either puts herself in peeing position or tries to poop without actually pooping.

I will get back with updates after letting her rest for a while, changing up her eating schedule (making sure she's not without hay for too long) and Omeprazole treatment. I would of course want to get everything checked at a clinic, but because I don't own the horse my options are very limited. The owner (a riding school) doesn't want us to take her to the vet unless the situation is very alarming, and even then they don't cover any expenses.

// We're also checking her for tapeworms.

Last edited by henna; 01-24-2020 at 06:39 PM.
henna is offline  
Reply

Tags
colic , constipation , poop problems

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome