Horse knocking cannon bones and pasterns? - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 48 Old 12-03-2014, 10:49 AM
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Your horse is splay-footed on both front legs (I call it "duck-footed"). Seems worse on the right front. Like the "B" example in this picture.



That will affect how your horse moves and swings its feet. And if you are waiting to have her feet trimmed, by the time you think they are "too long", they are probably really, really long. That makes it more difficult for her to breakover the toe, when she has anatomy like that.

For this particular horse, I would do regular farrier appointments every 4 to 5 weeks. Like clockwork. You don't want them getting too long.

Can you post pictures of her feet so we can see how her feet look? Probably would be the best if we could see them after a fresh trim.


Due to the obvious "dip" in her neck, it also appears as if she is quite under-muscled. How old is she? You stated you recently have been "working her hard" but what does that entail?


Anybody else notice the head bob when the horse turns to its left? Overall, the horse looks "stiff" and short-strided. I know you said money is tight right now, but I would find it really important to take your horse to a GOOD equine vet specialist and do a lameness evaluation. Anytime a horse is hitting themselves with their own legs, pain needs to be rules out.
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post #42 of 48 Old 12-03-2014, 11:21 AM Thread Starter
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Okay, my bell boots got here today and after putting them on, I don't know whether or not they fit. This is my first time ordering bell boots and she is around 14-15hh. So, I ordered the medium that they said would fit a average sized horse. The part that closes around her pastern seems loose to me. Is it supposed to be more form fitting or is it supposed to be loose to give more circulation? When she walks, they kind of make a noise sliding a little bit up and down her leg. Should I send them back?
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post #43 of 48 Old 12-03-2014, 01:12 PM
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Picture?

You want them to go all the way down to the ground in back but not so long they're pushing up and not sitting off the pastern. The pastern area is usually loose but it shouldn't be sloshing. Maybe a couple fingers. The lower ring (bottom portion) should be the same maybe a tad tighter. You don't want too much or too little motion and you want the proper coverage in back and on the sides. Properly fitted bell boots may move a little, you just don't want them rubbing. Unless she's sloshing/rubbing or they aren't sitting right they are probably fine.

Where exactly is she hitting again?
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post #44 of 48 Old 12-03-2014, 03:46 PM Thread Starter
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I will try to get pictures of both her hooves and the bell boots soon. Don't know when, but sometime soon. By working her harder, I mean before I was doing 1-2 mile rides a couple times a week on her, working more with my 4 year old mare. Recently, I have been taking her on 3-6 mile rides and working on getting her gallop just right. A couple of the places I ride have some hills we have to go up and down and they aren't like mountain steep but are pretty steep. I jumped her one day but I don't think that would matter because I was only jumping a foot and for only about 30 minutes. (she is still in training) She is 11. She is knocking her pastern(where a horse would hit if they were overreaching) and her cannonbones(more on the inside of her leg)
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post #45 of 48 Old 12-03-2014, 03:48 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159 View Post
Your horse is splay-footed on both front legs (I call it "duck-footed"). Seems worse on the right front. Like the "B" example in this picture.



That will affect how your horse moves and swings its feet. And if you are waiting to have her feet trimmed, by the time you think they are "too long", they are probably really, really long. That makes it more difficult for her to breakover the toe, when she has anatomy like that.

For this particular horse, I would do regular farrier appointments every 4 to 5 weeks. Like clockwork. You don't want them getting too long.

Can you post pictures of her feet so we can see how her feet look? Probably would be the best if we could see them after a fresh trim.


Due to the obvious "dip" in her neck, it also appears as if she is quite under-muscled. How old is she? You stated you recently have been "working her hard" but what does that entail?


Anybody else notice the head bob when the horse turns to its left? Overall, the horse looks "stiff" and short-strided. I know you said money is tight right now, but I would find it really important to take your horse to a GOOD equine vet specialist and do a lameness evaluation. Anytime a horse is hitting themselves with their own legs, pain needs to be rules out.
When lunging her, she has a harder time going one way than the other. I was told it is because she does not have muscle. Hence working her harder lately. How do you build up muscle? Could that be part of the problem?
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post #46 of 48 Old 12-03-2014, 06:47 PM
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Lack of muscle can contribute to the problem, but there can be a number of underlying causes for sidedness: Interfering more in one direction than the other (leg conformation problems greater on one side than the other or inappropriately asymmetrical hoof trim), back problems, injuries, and habit to name some very obvious ones. A lot of racehorses develop a physical asymmetry from being preferentially worked in one direction (not all trainers conscientiously train in both directions, and races generally are anti-clockwise where we live), riding horses can get similar problems from preferential work in one direction more than the other (and from the diagonal not being changed often enough and applied 50:50 during posting trots on a trail etc), from ill-fitting saddles, and from carrying one-sided riders.

Muscle development is helped with careful feeding and conditioning of the horse. Work on soft footing helps tremendously, on the lunge or riding (or driving). Don't do too much too soon, especially on soft ground: Gradually work at increased paces. Undulating terrain is helpful on trails, and figure riding and lateral exercises in the arena - for example.

Soft footing will exacerbate interference problems, so go gently and use protective equipment until your horse's underlying issues are sorted and it stops hitting itself. Interference is most pronounced at extended paces: So a working canter is often (but not always!) less of a problem than a flat-out trot.

Make sure there are no underlying injuries and gear fitting problems before doing any exercise programme!
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post #47 of 48 Old 12-03-2014, 06:50 PM
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PS Saddle fit note: My saddle fitter sees a lot of physical asymmetry in horses she fits and has to temporarily make the saddle asymmetrical to match the horse until the horse becomes more symmetrical, and so the saddle fit has to be readjusted at intervals during this process. That's because otherwise, the saddle will be contributing to the problem instead of helping to reduce it.

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post #48 of 48 Old 12-04-2014, 12:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebonyisforme View Post
When lunging her, she has a harder time going one way than the other. I was told it is because she does not have muscle. Hence working her harder lately. How do you build up muscle? Could that be part of the problem?
Yes, every horse, just like person is either "right handed" "left" and there a few you could call "ambidexterous". Just keep on working her weak side.

If may be part of the problem, but I don't think the main problem. Seems like the main problems are her feet and her leg conformation.

I'd definitely get brushing boots too if it's on her cannon. Hopefully she won't hit in between all this padding lol.
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