Just... Hay? - The Horse Forum
 5Likes
  • 1 Post By QtrBel
  • 2 Post By QtrBel
  • 1 Post By horselovinguy
  • 1 Post By LoriF
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 03:45 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 104
• Horses: 0
Just... Hay?

So, I live in a sandy place, so I have been feeding SandClear (psyllium Husks).

I came across this page and they say that the best way to clear sand and prevent sand colic is just... hay. Do you think that's true?

(Link may contain graphic images?)
GoGo5 is offline  
post #2 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 04:18 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 10,938
• Horses: 12
Yes. Long fiber, lots of it, always moving through the digestive tract if they are free choice.
secuono likes this.

Some horse people change their horse, they change their tack and discipline, they change their instructor; they never change themselves.
QtrBel is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 04:34 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 104
• Horses: 0
So, SandClear is not needed if they have hay 24/7? I do not really want to keep paying for SandClear if I do not need to.
GoGo5 is offline  
post #4 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 05:58 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 10,938
• Horses: 12
I've not seen any long term large studies prove for a fact that it actually works much less works better than hay. There are those that swear by it and if they don't have enough long fiber perhaps it will remove some but my feeling is that while a fecal test will show if there is sand in the gut to me it is saying what you are feeding is clearing it.

Best is to feed in a large enough pot they aren't dropping pelleted, concentrates or grains in sand to hover up. If you don't have a large enough pan then put a stall mat under what you have a sweep it regularly.

I never used to understand why the long troughs to feed in until I had few that like to spread feed.
LoriF and GoGo5 like this.

Some horse people change their horse, they change their tack and discipline, they change their instructor; they never change themselves.
QtrBel is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 06:19 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 13,132
• Horses: 0
So if the horse has been fed non-stop long fiber aka hay continually for some time = weeks to months...
For the cost of a Ziploc bag, some water and an handful of fresh poop you could answer your own question of do you continue to use a sanding product or stop...


So, gallon Ziploc bag, handful of fresh poop that has not touched any ground, fill 1/2 full of water...seal the bag, shake it to breakup and mix...set it aside to separate and see to visualize if you have a small amount of sand, more sand or a sandbox of sand in the gut..
Depending upon what you see should guide you in whether you continue sanding products done one week a month or stop and rely on them eating hay to move sand through the gut.
For me, I use TSC store brand of sand clear for a savings of several dollars but I know my guys are then hopefully clearer of any menace regardless of how much hay they eat, that sanding product should be collecting a lot more left behind.
A monthly check done if you are in a sandy area is worth it to me...better to check and treat accordingly than make a emergent phone call for a horse in trouble.
...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 06:31 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 104
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
So, gallon Ziploc bag, handful of fresh poop that has not touched any ground, fill 1/2 full of water...seal the bag, shake it to breakup and mix...set it aside to separate and see to visualize if you have a small amount of sand, more sand or a sandbox of sand in the gut..
How do I get that sample?
GoGo5 is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 06:50 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 10,938
• Horses: 12
Take it from the top of the freshest pile. I use a Walmart bag. Cheaper than gloves and I already have them.

Some horse people change their horse, they change their tack and discipline, they change their instructor; they never change themselves.
QtrBel is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 07:05 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 2,968
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
Take it from the top of the freshest pile. I use a Walmart bag. Cheaper than gloves and I already have them.
Or turn the ziploc bag inside out to grab the top of the pile. Hold it in your hand and use the other tp turn the bag back out. Easy, no extras needed...
SwissMiss is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 08-08-2020, 07:24 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 13,132
• Horses: 0
You need a good fist full of poop that hasn't touched the ground...and no shavings in it either.

Its only wet hay digested...come-on just reach down and grab a bunch.
Promise you will wash your hands really well afterwards...

Seriously, use a rubber glove, or as was said a thin plastic bag over your hand to protect you or carefully turn that Ziploc one to scoop those manure balls inside and not touch the sand is the important part or you can forget the results being factual.
Doesn't bother me to grab fresh in my hand....where I use to work your stalls were inspected and if found pieces left behind you were handpicking so you just did it and not be berated for leaving a stall dirty...yes, they were that picky but I was paid extremely well and that was part of the reason for it!
...
Acadianartist likes this.

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 08-09-2020, 09:18 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Northern Florida
Posts: 5,286
• Horses: 4
Long stem fiber is pretty good at clearing dirt/sand from a horses gut. They are always going to ingest it no matter what as long as they are not just standing around in a pristine stall.

There are some circumstances where it may not. For instance, alfalfa hay (not cubes or pellets) is going to be more capable than say finely stemmed coastal to help move sand through the gut. If I were feeding strictly coastal hay, then I might want to find some other way of helping to clear sand. I try to give my horses a variety of grass hays with a variety of textures so there is less of a chance of issues with nutrition and colic.
GoGo5 likes this.

There will be only one of you for all time. Fearlessly be yourself.
Coffee is my spirit animal
LoriF is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome