Lameness caused by chronic tendon injury? Advice needed. - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 06-15-2013, 10:40 AM Thread Starter
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Question Lameness caused by chronic tendon injury? Advice needed.

I recently acquired a lame horse. Don't ask why! 50% stupidity & 50% blind faith that I can find a cure. She's a 12yr Arab mare, her past history is virtually unknown. She's lame in her off-fore, but no heat, no swelling, no bony lumps. The only obvious abnormality is a tough, fibrous ridge that runs down the back of her pastern on one side.
The dealer said that in her previous "home" she lived in a tiny stable and had massively overgrown hooves, so she could barely walk. He had her shoes removed and her feet trimmed, but the lameness persists in her off-fore. I had the farrier look at her, and he said her feet are fine now.
When Pícara gets to her feet in the morning, she can hardly put her lame foot to the ground. After a while, she walks out almost ok, but trotting is virtually out of the question, as are sharp turns. To turn, she sits back on her hocks and swings both front legs round together.
That ridge in her pastern looks to me like an old injury in her superficial digital flexor tendon , possibly badly healed, (leading to an inelastic tendon and problems flexing her fetlock joint??). This is where I'd like some advice, as I have no experience of such problems. If there's scar tissue and no heat, is it an old injury? And if so, why is she so lame? Could she have a problem of adherence between tendon and sheath? Or perhaps her over-long feet have caused reinjury to the tendon?
Is there any way of pinpointing the problem without doing ultrasound? Or might I be way off track with all this?
Any ideas would be much appreciated. Pícara is a great horse and I'd love to ride her. But for the moment, weight-bearing is out of the question.
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post #2 of 8 Old 06-15-2013, 11:04 AM
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I would not want to make any sort of guess as to treatment for this horse.

I have dealt with torn ligaments and the first thing I did was get ultrasounds.

Hopefully you can afford to have the vet ultrasound her, get an accurate diagnosis and prognosis, plus his recommended treatment.

Then see what folks on the forum have done for their horses with similar issues

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post #3 of 8 Old 06-15-2013, 11:08 AM
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First thing I would do is go from the feet up. I know your farrier said her feet look good, but I would have your vet come out and take a look. It could be her feet hurt her and she may need shoes. Thats where I would start. She may have problems inside her hoof wall and with out xrays you would never know. She could have coffin bone rotation, infection....etc. With her being so lame I would start there. Your vet should be able to give you a little more in site to her problems.
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post #4 of 8 Old 06-16-2013, 12:01 PM Thread Starter
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Hmm. I'll get the vet her, and I bet he says ultrasound and/or xray. What did vets do before these technlogies existed?? I can't believe that people wrote off their horses with problematic lameness just because it was harder to diagnose the cause. Can anyone suggest alternative treatments that might help, even without a vet's diagnosis?
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post #5 of 8 Old 06-16-2013, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
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Hmm. I'll get the vet out to her, and I bet he says ultrasound and/or xrays. What did vets do to diagnose lameness before these technologies existed?? Surely a decent vet can get a good idea of what the problem is with an external examination.
Any suggestions for alternative treatments that could help even without a firm diagnosis?
If it was just her sole is sore because she's not used to being barefoot, how long before I could expect an improvement?
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post #6 of 8 Old 06-16-2013, 01:07 PM
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Before this technology? They put the horse down. She needs x rays and ultrasounds, there's no way around it. Her different way of going could absolutely cause coffin bone rotation. She absolutely could have retorn that ligament. The only way knowing would be the vet. Did you not expect vet bills when you took on a lame horse?
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post #7 of 8 Old 06-16-2013, 01:15 PM
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Technological advances help horses. You got this horse to help her, right? To find a cure for her? A vet and their technological advances are your only hope. If you aren't going to use that, perhaps putting her to sleep is the best option; a horse that has trouble walking even is living a sorry life.
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post #8 of 8 Old 06-16-2013, 04:18 PM
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Some of the treatments would stand your hair on end altho they seemed to work. Thank goodness the diagnostic tools are so much better as are the treatments.



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