Leg injuries - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 10-15-2015, 03:11 AM Thread Starter
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Question Leg injuries

I have a 7 year old QH gelding. For the last few months I have been fighting with limping in his front right. I have done bute, wrapping, ice and ligament poultice. He will have good days then bad days where he is limping. It is most obvious when he is trotting. He tends to have his right front out to keep weight off of it, or so it seems. He has no swelling or heat in the area and no signs of deformation like something is broken. My vet said it could be a pulled tendon or ligament and I put him on stall rest and bute-less but it didn't seem to help any. I only work him very lightly and do not ride hoping to build strength in his legs. I purchased DSMO and am going to try this next. I was hoping other horse lovers can give me some insight on something else to do/try to help relieve this pain for him. Everything I look up as far as his symptoms he only has half of them. I am trying not to turn him out to much but he tends to throw a fit when the other horses are out and he isn't and I feel that he will almost make it worse jumping around in his stall then just being able to walk in the pasture. I am worried it is dwindling my options of what it could be to Navicular and I have never dealt with that before and how to treat/manage it. If anyone has dealt with this issue your insight/wisdom would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much!
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-15-2015, 01:00 PM
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So...a vet has seen your horse? Or not???
Have you had radio-graphs done? aka xrays????
Have you had any ultrasounds done?

Till you go that next step and seek out finding what is causing a on-again off-again lameness there is nothing and no treatment plan you can accomplish.
Waiting, idle watching and trying this or that without at least ruling out several things is doing no good obviously as the horse is still not sound or comfortable....

Gut reaction with how you describe him.... age, transferring weight, no noticeable injury, no heat, no swelling but "pointing" his toe and gait description...
Navicular changes are occurring. Or a tendon/ligament issue.
Question though is to what degree and how much can be stabilized if you seek help from a qualified farrier and vet working together....
Doing nothing as you are and getting "0" good results from the remedies you've already tried should of told you already you need better information to help your horse...

Call your vet.
Get a set of xrays and if still needed move onto ultrasounds to either answer and see what is happening or to rule out what is not so you then at least know where to start looking for a issue...
The longer you procrastinate though the longer the horse is uncomfortable and possibly adding to the problem, compounding and making it worse...
You need some answers only a vet can give you through technology of pictures of the insides of the leg and hoof....till then no one here has magical eyes to see innards but can only make a guess...not good enough!
In the meantime, STOP riding the horse.
Without true information you could be destroying the chance of your horse healing correctly by re-injuring what is trying to heal..

Call the vet....
Get the vet out to examine the horse and start the search for a reason...
Good luck.
....
jmo..


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post #3 of 9 Old 10-15-2015, 01:54 PM
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Either get your horse to a vet or call one out. It should not cost much to have the vet examine the leg. If you can afford it, get some xrays or an ultrasound of the offending leg. I would also not be calling this so-called vet who is providing you GUESS work about an injury. It is both unprofessional and can be compromising.

Leg injuries are serious and you should not wait. In fact, tendon and ligament injuries which are left untreated can end a horse's riding career.

If your horse is pastured, bring him in and put him on stall rest. He should be off work until you speak to a vet. That means no riding whatsoever. None. Zilch. If there is a tendon injury, your horse will need to be off work for a minimum of 60 days. Be prepared to wait as these types of injuries can take a long time to heal.

You say there is nothing 'deforming' about his legs, but how experienced are your eyes, really? If there truly is nothing visible to the naked eye, it could be arthritis in which case being stalled is detrimental to the horse. This is why it is so important to have a vet come out and snap an xray of that leg. What you do to treat a tendon injury is not the same method you would use to treat arthritis.

No one here can tell you what is wrong with your horse; only an experienced lameness vet with the proper technology can provide you this peace of mind.
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post #4 of 9 Old 10-15-2015, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhollis8 View Post
I have a 7 year old QH gelding. For the last few months I have been fighting with limping in his front right. I have done bute, wrapping, ice and ligament poultice. He will have good days then bad days where he is limping.

I am worried it is dwindling my options of what it could be to Navicular and I have never dealt with that before and how to treat/manage it. If anyone has dealt with this issue your insight/wisdom would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much!
It is impossible to know what you are dealing with unless you take your horse in for a comprehensive lameness evaluation, with a lameness vet (not your general local vet)

A good lameness vet is going to examine how the horse moves on a straightaway and in a circle. They'll do a flexion test to determine which legs(s) are affected. Then they will do diagnostic tests that they feel are necessary. Might be x-rays or ultrasound or never blocking, etc.

Lameness usually is not straight forward and a lot of information has to be gathered.

Since you say that there is no obvious heat or swelling to the leg, my guess would be a tendon or ligament injury. However, it is possible to have a bursitis or bony changes.

If you don't do diagnostic testing, you are guessing in the dark.

You need to find out what is CAUSING the issue, before you can begin to treat it.

∞*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
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post #5 of 9 Old 10-16-2015, 01:15 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone!
I have had my vet who is very good with horses do a simple evaluation but but not an X-ray. I treated him with DSMO today but today was also a good day for him that he wasn't limping. I am going to keep up on the other treatments I do till the X-ray everything I read says no matter which it is that the DSMO, rest, mild stretching/lunging all are okay and can help. I also moved my round pen out into my pasture today and put him in there with some water and hay. I know its not "stall" rest but he was able to see the other horses and get some fresh air and seemed to be fine and was less jumpy and ticked at me then when he is in his stall all day. I know he tends to walk a little better right after his feet are done. Has anyone looked into a different pitch on the hoof to help with this? I understand I need to narrow down the injury before I can really do anything but having ideas to work though or different treatment methods lined up to try would be great.
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-16-2015, 10:20 PM
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"I am going to keep up on the other treatments I do till the X-ray everything I read says no matter which it is that the DSMO, rest, mild stretching/lunging all are okay and can help."

I don't know what you have been reading but would sure like to know so I can NOT read it or take that advice for my animals....
Seriously....
Your vet said a possible pulled tendon or ligament....
Well, what if it is more than a pull and a tear? A torn tendon or ligament...
Your lunging and turn-out could of made a weakened area worse...
Soft tissue injuries take months not days to heal.
You see a slight improvement and again re-stress the area then make a comment of again the horse being off.
The horse is telling you the only way it can it hurts and you and what you are doing is hurting him/her.

Personally,.... I will not offer you one word of encouragement on what you are doing.
You don't know what you are doing, period!
You don't know because you have not had a vet out as of yet to fully exam, diagnose or if warranted take xrays or ultrasounds to diagnose...

Till you fork over a few dollars and get a vets hands-on examination, xrays or more if needed and a diagnosis who could possibly tell you what might help??
It is all a guess...one wrong guess and you can forget ever riding a sound horse again that is for sure.
Your procrastinating and ignoring what your horse is telling you....
Darn foolish.
And if people think I'm being harsh... they should of read what I did not put in print but wanted to!!!

Why not instead of spending money on this, that or the other thing you read about someplace spend that money on a vet visit and answers so you do know what to do to help your horse.
In the long-run it will save you money and the horse pain and discomfort to just do it right...

Nope, no way no how would I give you any suggestions but CALL THE VET!!!
....
jmo...
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-16-2015, 11:16 PM
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I'm wondering why you aren't taking this more seriously?

Get x-rays or ultrasounds (or blocks done, could be an abscess) find out WHAT is going on THEN worry about how to treat it!!

I am surprised your vet hasn't scolded you yet.

You don't know what's going on are picking random treatment willy nilly and are wondering why your horse is still lame?

I'm not quite sure what else there is to say. He could be permanently crippled if he's not already, you can't fool around with things like that..

Completely agree, you will save more money and heartache and time and quite possibly your horse, and at least his "pain and suffering" by just letting the vet do their job.
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-16-2015, 11:38 PM
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I'm really weary about your vet. Is this person really just guessing what might be wrong with your horse? Did he offer an x-ray and you declined?

If this vet talked to you or saw your horse and didn't suggest an x-ray, get a new vet. I don't care how good he seems to be with horses if he knows that your horse is lame and did not attempt to investigate further.
If this vet did suggest an x-ray and you declined....huge mistake that you need to fix immediately.

The longer you wait to do this, the longer your horse is unduly suffering and I can assure you that different parts of what you're doing could be making matters far worse. In the meantime, stall rest FULL time is going to be the best bet until you know what's going on. Your horse will probably not like it. All the more reason to actually get this checked into ASAP so that you can actually get him feeling better ASAP.
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post #9 of 9 Old 10-17-2015, 09:59 AM
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OP I feel a little badly you're being jumped on, me included, so just want to stress that everyone has the horses best interests here and we are really trying to get across how serious this can be. The horse is in pain and is not diagnosed and you are guessing at what to do, lots of which may be making it worse.

I'm sure you don't want your horse to be suffering and I get diagnostics (x-rays, ultrasound, etc) can be expensive but some situations call for all in, a) so your horse is happy instead of in constant pain (for months) and b) so the issue can be fixed, hopefully fully and you can go back to enjoying your horse instead of wasting money on things that won't work and very well may be hurting, you are spending more money and time on things that are a waste at this point instead of just fixing the problem.

Have you even asked your vet for advice on what to do short of diagnostics? I would be VERY surprised if your vet said "go lunge him!". Many horses MUST be on stall rest, usually long term. This stuff is really serious. A little frolic (or lunging) can undo any healing and make it worse.

Pointing the toe while at rest is just him showing how extremely he hurts, that he doesn't want to put ANY weight on it even when he's not moving. (Fwiw I haven't seen a navicular horse do this though don't have a ton of experience)

So please, don't think we are "out to get you", we really are trying to help, both you and the horse.

It's just a shock to me, and I'm sure to others, when we read and say "ok, ok" then "WHAT??!!" when you just guess. I'm sure you can understand why it's not making sense to me that you may not want to turn him out and keep him on stall rest (the right thing to do, a stall sized paddock outside is suitable for an unhappy horse if it makes him happy and quiet, just don't let him move, it doesn't need to be "inside" unless you're walking a distance to it) then you just lunge him? You need to run stuff by the vet, he doesn't need strength he needs healing. Have you ever pulled a muscle? How would you feel if someone made you move it over and over and over to "strengthen" it.

So please just take a step back, don't let us scare you off, and just try to listen to what we are saying. It will save you a lot of anxiety too to just know what you're dealing with!
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