Mystery horse issues - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 24 Old 06-16-2019, 10:46 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Good, valid points and suggestions from all those above...

I would add Lyme's disease is now a problem near every state in this country today...and it is effecting our horses too.
She fits much of the criteria and where you thought sleeping, she could have sensitivity to light hence "resting" and "sleeping" look to her.
She is also only 4 so still growing, maturing and needs special care and proper nutrition to meet her bodies needs of developing correctly.

Could be so many things...and a alert care-giver is often on to something before it becomes a anything.
I would put it to the owner as it doesn't sound like she is yours that she seems off and it concerns you.
Ask them to get the vet to do a physical exam, some blood work/chemistry to make sure she is really OK so the work you ask of her is not to much for her young body.
Some 4 year olds are "old in spirit" and just steady in their disposition and ways...
Knowing for sure she is OK,.. would give you & the owners peace of mind spending a few $$ for is so worth.
<img style="max-width:100%;" src="https://www.horseforum.com/images/smilies/runninghorse2.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Runninghorse2" class="inlineimg" />...
Owner is concerned and has done a lot of research and worked with vet as well. Owner is out of town so I am caring for her horse at the moment and working on ground work with her - she’s never been overworked. Owner is up for anything to help, but isn’t finding anything. And the vet is not concerned. Horse has had a physical exam and blood work done - everything was good.
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post #12 of 24 Old 06-16-2019, 02:02 PM
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Might be time for a second opinion from a different vet. And get x-rays done just to be sure everything is ok. It's not normal for a horse to be that stiff behind. If x-rays are good then a horse chiropractor would be the next step.

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post #13 of 24 Old 06-16-2019, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by SSC View Post
Horse has had a physical exam and blood work done - everything was good.
I dont quite get that 'everything is good' if horse is stiff & can't pick up her back feet. That's not normal. Why did the vet say she is doing that if she is 'all good'?

Maybe the vet was mistaken & another opinion with a vet that specialises in lameness/bodywork (why I suggested chiro vet) is needed.
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Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #14 of 24 Old 06-17-2019, 10:10 AM
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I'd get a different vet to look at her. Just because one vet says nothing wrong, doesn't mean there isn't. Maybe look into an osteopath as well.
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post #15 of 24 Old 06-17-2019, 11:44 AM
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If she's so stiff she can't pick up her back feet, something is wrong and she's not 'ok'. I'd be getting a different vet. Something is going on.
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post #16 of 24 Old 06-17-2019, 12:14 PM
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I think all we can give are guesses, while the vet will be able to really pinpoint where the issue is occurring with a thorough examination. I do agree with getting a second or even 3rd opinion with other vets, even better If a specialist can come out.


When you mentioned stiffness and reluctance to pick up hinds, my mind went to ligaments, which easily go without clear symptoms until they become more chronic. Did the vet do an examination on hard ground and soft ground? Did the horse appear stiffer in one or the other?
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post #17 of 24 Old 06-17-2019, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSC View Post
I’m working with a horse currently who has some slightly odd symptoms



- very stiff back end to the point where I can rarely pick up her back feet, especially her left


She doesn’t act crappy or painful though - which is where I get confused.


Yes, horse is sound.

It possible that she needs more muscling and conditioning/fitness, but most horses (especially a young one) should not have any problem simply picking up a back foot. If she can't do that simple task, that is a big red flag for me.



Horses don't have to be all-out limping in order to have a pain problem somewhere. Most often, there is a change in their performance or behavior instead that alerts the owner there is something amiss.





Quote:
Originally Posted by SSC View Post
- dull coat

Dull coat can possibly be back of proper nutrition or possibly ulcers (and yes, even laid back horses like this one can get ulcers).


Quote:
Originally Posted by SSC View Post
Horse has had a physical exam and blood work done - everything was good.

To me, this means the vet literally "looked" at him, checked vitals, and said "he's good".



As others have already suggested, encourage the owner to take the horse to a lameness vet who can do flexion testing on the horse and evaluate his movements.



The overall "laziness" is not a problem (because it just sounds like the horse is lazy) but not being able to pick up a foot is.
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post #18 of 24 Old 08-28-2019, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by TeeZee View Post
I don't know where you live, but I would be checking for EPM as well. We brought a horse in that drug his hind toes, acted crabby or painful when cleaning or trimming his hinds, sometimes seemed drugged, but tore around the pasture like a demon. We hauled him 2 states away to a really good lameness vet since none local could figure him out. He was finally diagnosed with EPM.
I wanted to follow up with you. We finally did get a EPM diagnosis. Can you share you experience? Treatments? Outcome? Treatment started yesterday.
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post #19 of 24 Old 08-28-2019, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by SSC View Post
I wanted to follow up with you. We finally did get a EPM diagnosis. Can you share you experience? Treatments? Outcome? Treatment started yesterday.
Already did in your other thread:)
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post #20 of 24 Old 08-28-2019, 06:51 PM
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I didn't realize this was an old thread, was going to say I was glad the owner was on board and please do SOMETHING, not all vets are created equal, listen to your gut. Some horses are super quiet but it seems pretty obvious something is fairly wrong here. Glad you got a diagnosis. I will check out your other thread!!
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