New Farrier And More Health Issues for Paraise - The Horse Forum
 
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post #1 of 4 Old 05-28-2011, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
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New Farrier And More Health Issues for Paraise

Today was interesting :). Our farrier moved a little while ago but our new farrier I like better than the one we had. He came out today to do Paradise, Rosie, and Elroy and ended up doing Copper too. Paradise hasn't had his hooves done in 5 months(I know, I am terrible :() and so they were definatly in need of treatment. My dad did Rosie's couple of weeks ago but they were ready to be trimmed again. Everybody's look WONDERUL now! I am so pleased with the new guy :). He was a jockey for over 30 years and so he is familiar with thoroughbreds. Now he is a farrier who works on racehorses and riding horses alike. He seemed very knowledgable and diagnosed a couple of problems on Pari that I hadn't even known about. Aparently Pari has a cracked splint bone that is still healing and has fluid in his ankles and knees. The splint crack is from the track and will heal up with time. He got his leg pin-fired to help heal it. That must have been about 6 months ago. I didn't even know he had an issue there! He told me to give him bute whenever I ride to help dull the pain and that it will heal with time. Is there anything else I should do? Does he need to be on stall rest or have it wrapped? For the fluid he told me to hose his legs to help that. Will that go away? What does the fluid do/keep him from doing? Do I need to have my vet out on either of these issues? He also recomended that I get some hoof oil to help his cracks. He said that Pari might need shoes for a while if he is still walking sore in about a week or so. His feet sure look a lot better though, they were pretty chipped and cracked but now they are all shaped up and a lot more healthy looking :) I will definatly be calling this farrier back! I like him alot more that the other guy we had for a while. In fact, this is the best farrier I think we have ever had.

~Do Your Best, Prepare For The Worst, Then Trust GOD To Bring The Victory~Proverbs 21:31
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post #2 of 4 Old 05-28-2011, 10:48 PM
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Hi,

Good farriers seem hard to come by, so lucky you if you've found one! Interested to know how old your horse is, how long you've had him & how long off the track?

First & foremost, I encourage you to learn as much as you can about hoof care & health for yourself, as you will have a better idea of what is going on & what needs to happen. There are also a lot of factors that come down to you as owner, not an occasional farrier's visit, so it's important to learn how best to care for the horse for the rest of the time too. hoofrehab.com & ironfreehorse.com & Mayfield Barehoof Care Centre Home Page are 3 great sites to start with. The last site is actually of a master farrier and there is also information there on when/why shoes may be an appropriate option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trIplEcrOwngIrl View Post
He told me to give him bute whenever I ride to help dull the pain and that it will heal with time.
I wouldn't be inclined to do this. Yes, the bute will mask his pain, but pain is there for a reason and if he doesn't feel the damage he's doing, it may get worse, not better. I would be inclined to just stick to gentle exercise for now, listen to him/heed any pain & wait until he's well & truly healed before doing anything heavy duty. Free movement is very important for horses, so 'stall rest' is not generally a good idea unless absolutely necessary.

Quote:
For the fluid he told me to hose his legs to help that. Will that go away? What does the fluid do/keep him from doing? Do I need to have my vet out on either of these issues?
With so little info, who knows the answers to the above. Fluid may be due to inflammation, 'stocking up' due to lack of movement, bursitis, etc. Cold hosing can help. But yes, I would suggest that as you're concerned & have no idea what it is or why, finding a *good* vet who is knowledgeable about lameness/hooves would be a good idea.

Quote:
He also recomended that I get some hoof oil to help his cracks. He said that Pari might need shoes for a while if he is still walking sore in about a week or so.
Hoof oil doesn't help the health of hooves, only the looks, except perhaps if the prob is too wet environment. He may have cracked feet purely because they were left so long & overgrown, in which case, *keeping* them well maintained may be all that's needed for them to grow out, or there may be dietary, balance or other probs which caused them. Especially if they've been overgrown in the past, getting a rasp and learning to keep them 'rolled' in between farrier visits can be a good move.

Why is the horse 'walking sore'? Hopefully it wasn't from the trim, as this could indicate farrier error - tho who knows with so little info. I would expect that, even if the horse was well cared for & in good shape previously and that his diet/management etc are good again now, going for 5 months without hoof care would mean his feet are not in great shape. Therefore I wouldn't generally consider shoes at least until his hooves are in a healthy, strong shape. Just like with the bute, I wouldn't want to just mask any problems. If he is sore, I would instead suggest hoof boots or such, which will protect and support his feet without damaging them further.

If you would like any further opinions, lots more info about your horse, and pix would help. You can learn how best to take hoof-confo pix here; Good Hoof Photos - How to take Good Hoof Photos

Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #3 of 4 Old 05-29-2011, 05:29 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for replying

Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Hi,
Good farriers seem hard to come by, so lucky you if you've found one! Interested to know how old your horse is, how long you've had him & how long off the track?
Yes we have had tried atleast 3 other farriers with our previous horses but none of them(except maybe the last one we had) really seemed to know what they were doing. THis guy seemed very knowledgable and I trust him with my horse(there are very few people I trust to take care of my horse). He was recomended by a friend who owns and trains horses. To answer your questions, I have had Pari for 5 months, he is 5 years old, and his last race was in November. He stopped racing because he has OCD (osteochondritis dissecans), though I suspect that the fact he popped his splint may have played a role. I didn't know about the splint injury when I got him though.

Quote:
First & foremost, I encourage you to learn as much as you can about hoof care & health for yourself, as you will have a better idea of what is going on & what needs to happen. There are also a lot of factors that come down to you as owner, not an occasional farrier's visit, so it's important to learn how best to care for the horse for the rest of the time too. hoofrehab.com & ironfreehorse.com & Mayfield Barehoof Care Centre Home Page are 3 great sites to start with. The last site is actually of a master farrier and there is also information there on when/why shoes may be an appropriate option.
Thank you, I will definatly check out those websites and do some serious research. I want to know more so I can keep him in better shape.

Quote:
I wouldn't be inclined to do this. Yes, the bute will mask his pain, but pain is there for a reason and if he doesn't feel the damage he's doing, it may get worse, not better. I would be inclined to just stick to gentle exercise for now, listen to him/heed any pain & wait until he's well & truly healed before doing anything heavy duty. Free movement is very important for horses, so 'stall rest' is not generally a good idea unless absolutely necessary.
Okay, thanks. How long do you think it will take to heal? I will talk to my vet about it, but I was just wondering :)

Quote:
With so little info, who knows the answers to the above. Fluid may be due to inflammation, 'stocking up' due to lack of movement, bursitis, etc. Cold hosing can help. But yes, I would suggest that as you're concerned & have no idea what it is or why, finding a *good* vet who is knowledgeable about lameness/hooves would be a good idea.
Okay, I will see if I can get my vet to come out. He had problems with swelling in his legs this past winter from standing and not getting enough excersise but that went away when the snow did and I could start riding again.

Quote:
Hoof oil doesn't help the health of hooves, only the looks, except perhaps if the prob is too wet environment. He may have cracked feet purely because they were left so long & overgrown, in which case, *keeping* them well maintained may be all that's needed for them to grow out, or there may be dietary, balance or other probs which caused them. Especially if they've been overgrown in the past, getting a rasp and learning to keep them 'rolled' in between farrier visits can be a good move.
Yes, that is what he said, that his feet were cracked from not being trimmed in so long. He said that if I put hoof-flex or something similar that that would make his feet tougher as they are pretty weak right now. He doesn't have any more cracks or chips now though. He also said to get sole-freeze (I think that is what it was called) because his soles are thin and would get injured easily.

Quote:
Why is the horse 'walking sore'? Hopefully it wasn't from the trim, as this could indicate farrier error - tho who knows with so little info. I would expect that, even if the horse was well cared for & in good shape previously and that his diet/management etc are good again now, going for 5 months without hoof care would mean his feet are not in great shape. Therefore I wouldn't generally consider shoes at least until his hooves are in a healthy, strong shape. Just like with the bute, I wouldn't want to just mask any problems. If he is sore, I would instead suggest hoof boots or such, which will protect and support his feet without damaging them further.
I haven't been to the barn today so I don't know if he is still sore but he wasn't lame, just tender. The other two weren't and the farrier said that he probably would be for a day but then he should be fine. I think he was suggesting shoes if he was still sore because that is what he was used to and the track and his feet aren't very tough. I don't know if that is the right option or though, I will check out that website you recomended though :)

Quote:
If you would like any further opinions, lots more info about your horse, and pix would help. You can learn how best to take hoof-confo pix here; Good Hoof Photos - How to take Good Hoof Photos
I am going to the barn tomorrow so I will get some pictures. I was going to yesterday but I didn't have time :(

THank you for your help :)

~Do Your Best, Prepare For The Worst, Then Trust GOD To Bring The Victory~Proverbs 21:31
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post #4 of 4 Old 05-29-2011, 11:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trIplEcrOwngIrl View Post
He stopped racing because he has OCD (osteochondritis dissecans),
Yes, 'popping splints' is unfortunately quite common, especially in punishing work for babies, such as racehorses. Where abouts is the OCD? Has he been operated on for it?

Quote:
Okay, I will see if I can get my vet to come out. He had problems with swelling in his legs this past winter from standing and not getting enough excersise but that went away when the snow did and I could start riding again.
Yes, it's important to get them moving regularly, regardless of weather, if they don't do much on their own. Obviously if he's not moving due to pain tho, you won't generally want to force the issue....

Quote:
He said that if I put hoof-flex or something similar that that would make his feet tougher as they are pretty weak right now. He doesn't have any more cracks or chips now though. He also said to get sole-freeze (I think that is what it was called) because his soles are thin and would get injured easily.
The hooflex or any other paint on goop won't make his feet tougher. They need to *grow* tougher. Diet and management are extremely important factors. Ensuring he's on a healthy low-carb, low sugar high fibre diet(as opposed to the high-octane stuff he's been fed as a racehorse), getting appropriate supplements to ensure nutrition is balanced is about the single most important step you can take IME to help him grow healthy feet. Dry, firm ground is best - or at least try to set up some time daily for his feet to dry out, if you're in wet environs - and free movement/regular exercise also helps them grow quicker/stronger.

Likewise, his soles need to *grow* strong & thick. Chemical hardeners can sometimes make a difference to how a horse *feels* on his thin soles, but if they're thin/dropped(quite common among TB types, especially intensively managed ones such as racers), they will need support & protection until they can grow better, if he's working on rough, hard ground, to protect him from bruising/abscessing of the solar corium. I would be looking at getting boots, at least for his front feet(backs often don't need it) for working/harsh ground, until his feet become healthy.

Quote:
I haven't been to the barn today so I don't know if he is still sore but he wasn't lame, just tender. The other two weren't and the farrier said that he probably would be for a day but then he should be fine. I think he was suggesting shoes if he was still sore because that is what he was used to and the track and his feet aren't very tough.
I'm still not sure why he's sore/tender? If it's a post trim prob, it could possibly be due to how much had to come off because they were so overgrown or such, but generally speaking, post-trim soreness is often due to farrier error unfortunately. Even if so, I wouldn't necessarily jump to judging the farrier, as it may be that he's just done a tad too much for this particular horse at this particular time or such. But unfortunately a lot of farriers will routinely cause soreness because they trim into live sole, routinely pare frogs, etc. They also frequently leave stretched toes & flares without backing up/rolling, so the leverage on breakover can make the horse sensitive. So again, it's important to learn the principles for yourself, so you have a better idea of whether or not your 'expert' is actually as good as he reckons he is.

Regarding shoes, my personal opinion is that especially if his feet are unhealthy, shoes are not likely a good option(not dead against shoes btw), but as with everything, it's important to learn the pros & cons & principles & effects of the alternatives & make up your own mind, rather than relying on some 'expert' or otherwise opinion without being informed.

Anyway, hope that provides more food for thought for you & will look out for those pics. Cheers.

Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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