Newbie Brings Her Horse Home - The Horse Forum
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  • 2 Post By Kalraii
  • 2 Post By dustywyatt
  • 1 Post By rambo99
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post #1 of 10 Old 08-19-2019, 10:24 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada
Posts: 330
• Horses: 1
Newbie Brings Her Horse Home

Hello everyone!

Some of you who may read this know that Iíve been trying to buy a horse property for awhile and guess what? It looks like itís finally about to happen! Accepted offer and inspections are all passed (some with flying colors!)... now to start renovation planning

The land is already set up for Andee, and done pretty well, which is a nice change. Iím a city kid so Iím completely new to the potential of having my horse at home and I have a question: FEEDING.

Some stats: Andee is 21, heís an easy keeper and his work load is light. He is 15 hands at most, stocky build and has a lazy disposition.

I plan to buy a slow feeder hay net for feed over the winter months (Iím in Alberta, Canada) but I have no idea about what kind of daily or weekly supplements Iím going to need to make sure heís getting all of his nutrients.

Then in the spring and summer, Iím really not sure. Iíve heard horses always need to have food in their bellies. This property is set up with small rotational paddocks so that makes things a bit easier but do I let him graze all day? Or only during certain times?

Any and all advice is welcome as I have noooo idea and I have a few months to research before we take possession.

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post #2 of 10 Old 08-19-2019, 10:51 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: London, UK
Posts: 1,240
• Horses: 1
Welcome and this sounds so exciting. Better able people will come along shortly but I am curious how big the fields are that you said you would be rotating between? I did quite a few feed and hay tests but as i board by the time I got the results a new batch is delivered 😞 I would love the chance like you to do a soil, grass, hay test etc. Especially as i would wanna try my best to keep a healthy pasture as I've seen far too many that are overgrown with inedible forage. Looks good and lush but horses wont touch it!
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post #3 of 10 Old 08-19-2019, 01:54 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada
Posts: 330
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalraii View Post
Welcome and this sounds so exciting. Better able people will come along shortly but I am curious how big the fields are that you said you would be rotating between? I did quite a few feed and hay tests but as i board by the time I got the results a new batch is delivered 😞 I would love the chance like you to do a soil, grass, hay test etc. Especially as i would wanna try my best to keep a healthy pasture as I've seen far too many that are overgrown with inedible forage. Looks good and lush but horses wont touch it!
I donít know the size of the fields, but the property is only 4.15 acres so itís more like smaller pens covering a 3 acre section.

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post #4 of 10 Old 08-20-2019, 08:15 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Southern OR
Posts: 72
• Horses: 5
Congratulations! It's awesome being able to have your horses at home.






I can't say our methods are "the right way" to do things, but I can tell you what we do.




We have about 40 acres, 18 of which are in grassy pasture. The rest are just rocks, sagebrush, and juniper trees. We hay the grass in spring and then turn out the horses after the first cutting, usually around mid-June. The pastures are split into three sections and we rotate the three depending on what the grass looks like. We also irrigate starting in spring until fall when the temperature drops to where the grass doesn't want to grow anymore. If the horses look too fat, we turn them out during the day and then put them in the dry sage sections overnight. There's a little grass that grows there, but if necessary we give them a little clean, low-quality hay to keep them occupied overnight. I definitely recommend soil and feed tests - it's nice to get an idea of what kind of feed you'll have available.
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post #5 of 10 Old 08-21-2019, 01:04 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada
Posts: 330
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustywyatt View Post
Congratulations! It's awesome being able to have your horses at home.






I can't say our methods are "the right way" to do things, but I can tell you what we do.




We have about 40 acres, 18 of which are in grassy pasture. The rest are just rocks, sagebrush, and juniper trees. We hay the grass in spring and then turn out the horses after the first cutting, usually around mid-June. The pastures are split into three sections and we rotate the three depending on what the grass looks like. We also irrigate starting in spring until fall when the temperature drops to where the grass doesn't want to grow anymore. If the horses look too fat, we turn them out during the day and then put them in the dry sage sections overnight. There's a little grass that grows there, but if necessary we give them a little clean, low-quality hay to keep them occupied overnight. I definitely recommend soil and feed tests - it's nice to get an idea of what kind of feed you'll have available.

Do you feed any loose mineral or vitamin supplements?

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post #6 of 10 Old 08-21-2019, 11:17 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,590
• Horses: 0
How exciting to have your horse at home. You could try putting out the ADM grow strong vit /min can be put out free choice ,or mixed with some kind of feed.

Wouldn't need to use alot of feed just enough to get the supplement into horse.
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post #7 of 10 Old 08-21-2019, 12:36 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Southern OR
Posts: 72
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by MouseZ View Post
Do you feed any loose mineral or vitamin supplements?
We haven't used any loose supplements, but we have a selenium block (Oregon is crazy deficient in selenium) and a basic mineral salt block as well.
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post #8 of 10 Old 08-21-2019, 02:44 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,120
• Horses: 3
Congrats - having your horses at home is so exciting!

Is it just one horse or do you have multiple horses you will be looking after?

I also live in Alberta and have a smaller acreage as well with 3 horses. I have 3 different pens/paddocks I rotate my horses on. 2 are grass paddocks and the third is a small dry lot (sacrifice pen). Since I have one horse who is an extremely easy keeper and not enough land to support the other two, I do not allow them to graze 24/7.

In the summer my 2 geldings are on grass for most of the day, however I do bring them in at night and feed hay - loose as well as in slow feeder nets.

As for supplements, etc..I have a salt block in the pen with them that they have access to all the time. However, I find that they do not get enough salt, so I also mix in a couple tbsp of loose salt in their feed at night.

You will need to be careful if you have a small amount of land - if you allow your horse to over-graze it then it will become overgrown with weeds and/or turn to a dry lot. Also, if your horse is an easy keeper you may not want to allow him to graze all the time. Ideally you could allow him to graze during the evening/night and then bring him in during the day and feed hay in a hay net.
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post #9 of 10 Old 08-22-2019, 10:22 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada
Posts: 330
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbar View Post
Congrats - having your horses at home is so exciting!

Is it just one horse or do you have multiple horses you will be looking after?

I also live in Alberta and have a smaller acreage as well with 3 horses. I have 3 different pens/paddocks I rotate my horses on. 2 are grass paddocks and the third is a small dry lot (sacrifice pen). Since I have one horse who is an extremely easy keeper and not enough land to support the other two, I do not allow them to graze 24/7.

In the summer my 2 geldings are on grass for most of the day, however I do bring them in at night and feed hay - loose as well as in slow feeder nets.

As for supplements, etc..I have a salt block in the pen with them that they have access to all the time. However, I find that they do not get enough salt, so I also mix in a couple tbsp of loose salt in their feed at night.

You will need to be careful if you have a small amount of land - if you allow your horse to over-graze it then it will become overgrown with weeds and/or turn to a dry lot. Also, if your horse is an easy keeper you may not want to allow him to graze all the time. Ideally you could allow him to graze during the evening/night and then bring him in during the day and feed hay in a hay net.
Yay! A fellow Albertan horse bud ^_^

The property has three or four very small pastures and then a dry lot so at least that will help me keep his weight in check. I know where heís currently boarded he doesnít have food access 24/7 so I figure itís not true that horses ALWAYS have to have food in their guts to survive (though he would tell you otherwise, he loves eating).

Got Curly?
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post #10 of 10 Old 08-22-2019, 02:13 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,120
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by MouseZ View Post
Yay! A fellow Albertan horse bud ^_^

The property has three or four very small pastures and then a dry lot so at least that will help me keep his weight in check. I know where heís currently boarded he doesnít have food access 24/7 so I figure itís not true that horses ALWAYS have to have food in their guts to survive (though he would tell you otherwise, he loves eating).
Sounds like you have some options for rotating the grazing which is a nice bonus. I don't normally leave my guys for more than a few hours without food. Their stomachs are always producing acid, so constantly nibbling is good for their guts - tricky when you have easy keepers! That's why slow feeder nets or grazing muzzles are great ideas. My mare almost always has a hay net in front of her - but it is up to her if she actually chooses to eat it. Most of the time she'd prefer to try and nibble on the tiny bit of grass that does pop up in her pen.
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