Trailering in Winter - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Trailering in Winter

I am changing stables today, so I need to trailer my horse. She will be hauled tied (or untied, depending on advice) in a stock trailer. The trip will last for approximately an hour, and the temperature is going to be approximately 29 Fahrenheit (-2 Celsius) without wind chill. We will be going on the highway, which is, like, 50 mph (80 km/h).

My horse has a thicc winter coat and is outside all day, everyday. I have never hauled in the winter, so I do not know how the wind chill works (I also don't blanket, so I don't know how blanketing works). I have a simple rain sheet and a blanket with a lightweight (maybe medium?) fill. Should I blanket or no? If yes, which one, or both?

It's not just the body wind chill, is it? It's also the air they are breathing. It's not my trailer, so I can't put up wind breakers in the trailer.

Last edited by TechNicker; 01-22-2020 at 09:56 AM.
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post #2 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:12 AM
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How open is the stock trailer? In an enclosed trailer you wouldn't need anything and it would warm up well. If the stock trailer just has those smaller windows and the body is solid for enough windbreak, you'd likely be fine naked. If the stock trailer is quite open then you won't have that heating. In that case, I'd go with either the rain sheet or a light sheet to cut the wind. With the wind from travel, that -3 will probably be closer to -15. I wouldn't worry about them breathing cold air, they can handle much worse, but IMO they are already going to be tense from standing on a trailer so if you add a chill, they may end up muscle sore from standing cold on the trailer for an hour.
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post #3 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:13 AM Thread Starter
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I know that closed trailers actually get quite warm, so, usually, no blanket is needed. I do not know about open stocks, though.

ETA:
Okay, so we posted at the same time.

It is a large(ish), semi-open trailer. I don't know the exact type/make/model. I can bring both and ask the BO about blanketing, too.
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post #4 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TechNicker View Post
I am changing stables today, so I need to trailer my horse. She will be hauled tied (or untied, depending on advice) in a stock trailer. The trip will last for approximately an hour, and the temperature is going to be approximately 29 Fahrenheit (-2 Celsius) without wind chill. We will be going on the highway, which is, like, 50 mph (80 km/h).

My horse has a thicc winter coat and is outside all day, everyday. I have never hauled in the winter, so I do not know how the wind chill works (I also don't blanket, so I don't know how blanketing works). I have a simple rain sheet and a blanket with a lightweight (maybe medium?) fill. Should I blanket or no? If yes, which one, or both?

It's not just the body wind chill, is it? It's also the air they are breathing. It's not my trailer, so I can't put up wind breakers in the trailer.
I would put the lightweight blanket on her. Is she used to trailering? I think they are more stable tied, but in a open stock trailer would tie her either to the passenger side corner near the front, or even turn her to face backwards and tie her that way.


Normally I tie on the drivers side, but that is going to be a lot of wind coming in her face, so that why I suggested tying her to the passenger side of the trailer.


I used to put a fly mask on my horses when I had a stock trailer, to protect their eyes from things blown in
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post #5 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:19 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by AnitaAnne View Post
I would put the lightweight blanket on her. Is she used to trailering? I think they are more stable tied, but in a open stock trailer would tie her either to the passenger side corner near the front, or even turn her to face backwards and tie her that way.


Normally I tie on the drivers side, but that is going to be a lot of wind coming in her face, so that why I suggested tying her to the passenger side of the trailer.


I used to put a fly mask on my horses when I had a stock trailer, to protect their eyes from things blown in
"Used to trailering?" I don't think so. She has been in trailers before, and even went on a ten hour trailer ride (years ago, crossing state lines), but it is not a routine thing. Once, we went on a trailered for a trail ride, but it is usually only when we move barns.

The fly mask is a good idea, but she lost hers in pasture somewhere, somehow.
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post #6 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TechNicker View Post
"Used to trailering?" I don't think so. She has been in trailers before, and even went on a ten hour trailer ride (years ago, crossing state lines), but it is not a routine thing. Once, we went on a trailered for a trail ride, but it is usually only when we move barns.

The fly mask is a good idea, but she lost hers in pasture somewhere, somehow.
If she is not used to trailering, I would definitely tie her up. Maybe you could borrow a fly mask?
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post #7 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:39 AM
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I have a stock trailer.
My trailer has solid steel sides, but barred opening top about 15" sides and back.
My trailer front is solid closed with butterfly vents I can control the air flow through.
The breeze and winds swirl inside the trailer a lot more than most realize.

I would blanket the horse...you have wind chill temperatures if you are traveling roads at high speeds, in a open side trailer.
I would face the horse forward so the face is protected from biting cold forced to breathe with speed of travel.
My horses traveling forward do not travel with their heads elevated to see out the trailer sides so some protection but turn them backward and up the head goes, eyes wide and curious trying to see out...yea, no.
If you decide to trailer backward then also use a fly mask to protect the eyes from any debris in the air that hurts when impact and can be blinding if a eye is involved.
I would also tie since it has been some time since the horse has been trailered and you want some control of how much that animal is going to move and wander in the trailer loose.
If your horse is shod, even if not, I would use bell boots on the front hooves at least.
Again, you don't know how the horse ships...quiet or a foot scrambler are very different animals in a trailer.

The rule of thumb is you trailer a single horse drivers side {USA} because of how roads are constructed in this country.
There are other recent threads that touched on this topic and why you do certain things when loading a single animal in a trailer regardless of design.
...
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post #8 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 10:44 AM
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If you can't locate a fly mask, then she would be traveling facing forward so protection from the front of the trailer she has for her eyes and face.
Tied, you bet she would be if she were mine.

Good luck in your travels today...take your time and enjoy the things you learn in your adventure today.
...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #9 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 11:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
I have a stock trailer.
My trailer has solid steel sides, but barred opening top about 15" sides and back.
My trailer front is solid closed with butterfly vents I can control the air flow through.
The breeze and winds swirl inside the trailer a lot more than most realize.

I would blanket the horse...you have wind chill temperatures if you are traveling roads at high speeds, in a open side trailer.
I would face the horse forward so the face is protected from biting cold forced to breathe with speed of travel.
My horses traveling forward do not travel with their heads elevated to see out the trailer sides so some protection but turn them backward and up the head goes, eyes wide and curious trying to see out...yea, no.
If you decide to trailer backward then also use a fly mask to protect the eyes from any debris in the air that hurts when impact and can be blinding if a eye is involved.
I would also tie since it has been some time since the horse has been trailered and you want some control of how much that animal is going to move and wander in the trailer loose.
If your horse is shod, even if not, I would use bell boots on the front hooves at least.
Again, you don't know how the horse ships...quiet or a foot scrambler are very different animals in a trailer.

The rule of thumb is you trailer a single horse drivers side {USA} because of how roads are constructed in this country.
There are other recent threads that touched on this topic and why you do certain things when loading a single animal in a trailer regardless of design.
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
If you can't locate a fly mask, then she would be traveling facing forward so protection from the front of the trailer she has for her eyes and face.
Tied, you bet she would be if she were mine.

Good luck in your travels today...take your time and enjoy the things you learn in your adventure today.
...
Excellent advise as always. I have a trailer that is the same configuration as Horselovinguy. Mine stand pretty calm and I don't use the bell boots but, if you have a dancer it would be a good idea. I use a fleece cool down blanket and if you have tie rings with the safety slip they are best if your horse was to slip and fall. If not don't tie too tight but, still can't step on or thru the lead line. My 14' stock has a divider in the middle and it helps to have it closed so the horse doesn't move too much.
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post #10 of 14 Old 01-22-2020, 02:05 PM
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Highly recommend having blankets along if not worn. In the event of an accident they're really important for keeping core temperature up. I'd blanket outright for the trip even if it wasn't totally necessary. Also tie with a breakaway. Thems my thoughts.
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