Uneven sacrum? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 09-17-2019, 07:24 PM Thread Starter
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Uneven sacrum?

Brought in an 8yo Arabian mare Saturday. I was originally just looking for a project horse but I ran into her and she was so sweet I just snatched her up. She's not broke and has been sitting at pasture for a while. Her hooves are in poor shape(farrier comes friday). I know I'm going to be scolded for not having a PPE, I understand it was a bad idea, I just felt bad for her and no matter what I will be keeping her even if it's just as a companion. She is sound in w/t/c, no pain when I palpate the area but I can see that there's definitely unevenness there, muscle atrophy maybe. Vet comes out next month to float her teeth, give inoculations and do a fecal egg count, so she could take a look then. Give me your opinions on what could cause this, maybe it's just that her hooves are so unbalanced or maybe she actually has sustained a serious injury somehow in the past. I'll include photos of both hind hooves(sorry for the poor lighting)
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post #2 of 18 Old 09-17-2019, 07:54 PM
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Her hooves aren't hideous. Glad you're getting them done, of course.

It will be interesting to hear what your vet says. If he or she is also a chiropractor, great! If not, I'd get one out.

I like doing two things before and after getting busy work done. I like to get the horse on the flattest ground available, and standing as square as the horse can.

Then I measure from bony prominences and/or anatomical markers to the ground on each side. Point of the shoulder. Hips to the ground. Croup. You pick. Everyone has their favorites.

I also like to have a horse stand as described and get up behind them and a little above and take a photo from back to front. I've been amazed to see how well this shows straightness, or not, and how every thing is related.

I hope you give us an update. Good luck with her!
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post #3 of 18 Old 09-17-2019, 10:18 PM
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I would also ask the vet to do a quick neuro exam when he visits. Make sure the horse is aware of exactly where her hind legs are.
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post #4 of 18 Old 09-18-2019, 11:23 AM
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That type of unevenness (Asymmetry) is often associated with sacroiliac damage.
The Pelvis isn't supported correctly and over time it starts to tilt to one side

If you view the horse from the side it probably appears to have some or all of the following:
A 'hunters/jumpers' bump,
The topline has a 'scooped out' appearance
There's a small hollow just in front of the 'bump'

If the horse has been like it for a long time then the muscles and ligaments will have adapted to hold things in place so there might not be any signs of pain.
The horse might still have an uneven gait and drag its hind toes
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post #5 of 18 Old 09-18-2019, 12:39 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
That type of unevenness (Asymmetry) is often associated with sacroiliac damage.
The Pelvis isn't supported correctly and over time it starts to tilt to one side

If you view the horse from the side it probably appears to have some or all of the following:
A 'hunters/jumpers' bump,
The topline has a 'scooped out' appearance
There's a small hollow just in front of the 'bump'

If the horse has been like it for a long time then the muscles and ligaments will have adapted to hold things in place so there might not be any signs of pain.
The horse might still have an uneven gait and drag its hind toes
Is it usually permanent/reoccurring?What kind of treatment is usually Involved? I believe it's been this way for a while, she does have a hunters bump.
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post #6 of 18 Old 09-19-2019, 08:38 AM
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If the pelvis has tilted then the chances of that ever being corrected are pretty low to zero. People will say that chiropractors can realign it but considering how strong the muscles are that hold those bones in place and that they’re surrounded by other ‘body parts’ there’s a high risk of causing more trouble.
It sounds as if the horse has adjusted to the changes caused by the old SI injury if it isn’t in pain or unsound so apart from maybe getting a good equine physio and massage therapist on board to advise on exercises that might help, I’d leave well alone.
Your vet can do a rectal ultrasound to take a look at the SI.
Obviously fixing hoof issues will benefit the horse as everything works together.
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post #7 of 18 Old 09-19-2019, 09:55 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
If the pelvis has tilted then the chances of that ever being corrected are pretty low to zero. People will say that chiropractors can realign it but considering how strong the muscles are that hold those bones in place and that they’re surrounded by other ‘body parts’ there’s a high risk of causing more trouble.
It sounds as if the horse has adjusted to the changes caused by the old SI injury if it isn’t in pain or unsound so apart from maybe getting a good equine physio and massage therapist on board to advise on exercises that might help, I’d leave well alone.
Your vet can do a rectal ultrasound to take a look at the SI.
Obviously fixing hoof issues will benefit the horse as everything works together.
Makes sense, but if she's never been ridden what would cause this? A bad fall or maybe injury as a foal? I got newer pictures this morning. Waiting for the vet to get back with me.
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post #8 of 18 Old 09-19-2019, 10:03 AM
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Your overhead picture tells quite the story...
Your horse is out of align...from nose to tail there is a out-of-align look to her.
Her body just speaks of out of whack.

She stands off balance and guarded in positioning of her body...
How it happened, who knows.
How to fix it is the question and I don't know that either...suspect more will profess chiro work.
These are pictures your vet needs to see to offer you some guidance and for him to also have better understanding of what the issue may be...
Good luck.

jmo..
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post #9 of 18 Old 09-19-2019, 10:05 AM
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Chiropractic but maybe just general body work also. I agree with waiting to see what your vet has to say. She's only eight -- I don't think this is necessarily a hopeless cause by any means.
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post #10 of 18 Old 09-19-2019, 10:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eryn Jones View Post
Makes sense, but if she's never been ridden what would cause this? A bad fall or maybe injury as a foal? I got newer pictures this morning. Waiting for the vet to get back with me.
I had a young horse with a similar problem, his happened as a result of some rough playing in the field that ended with another horse rearing and landing on his back. It isn't always down to riding related incidents.
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