Medications and Chemicals That Harm Horses - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 07:55 AM Thread Starter
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Medications and Chemicals That Harm Horses

Inspired to post this thread by thoughts about the Himalayan Salt thread.


Dogs are known to really like automotive anti-freeze and it will kill them.


Chocolate is bad for them.


I've read that some breeds of dogs can be harmed by eating the droppings of horses on ivermectin.



There are long lists of plants that harm horses in various ways.


A search for things that affect horses such a those mentioned for dogs has so far turned up nothing.


Has anybody heard of any none natural chemicals, medications, or similar that horses really like but will harm them if they become available to the horse?
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post #2 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 08:36 AM
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The only poisonous plant I have known horses readily eat is yew. Kills them fairly fast.

Some will eat acorns and other plants that are bad for them but it is not the norm

Avocados are meant to be toxic for dogs as are grapes. We had a vine that the dogs would periodically raid and no harm came to them. Dittomwith amfriends dogs eating the avocados that grew about her place.
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post #3 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 09:24 AM
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It is said any fruit with large pit is a danger for the horse...the pit shell is toxic aside from not digestible.
Plum, peach, nectarine, apples seeds if enough ingested contain cyanide and apples ferment where they should not again in large enough quantity causes issues...

Dogs, onions is another warned against them consuming.
Ivermectin syringe empty containers from horse wormer is often deadly not because of the Ivermectin but because of the strength of the product geared for a horse, even in small amounts is to strong and kills.
Cap the container and literally throw it in a sealed garbage can for disposal.
Advil, Tylenol or the generics can cause great distress and poison dogs...
Aspirin in proper dose is safe to administer.

I know you were looking for dangerous, but safe to have on hand/use I think is good to know in case of emergency too...

Benedryl is safe in appropriate dosage for a dog suffering from a allergic reaction as you seek medical help. Bring the container with you and know how much you gave for the vet to know...
Benedryl also can help to calm a distressed animal from say fireworks if you not have vet prescribed tranqs to give.
I've also used Benadryl for my dog when he broke through his seizure medications....was not pretty.

My vet told me expired Banamine as long as it is not cloudy is safe to administer.
Up to 3 years post expiration they have known given with no adverse effects...
If anything a bit less potent, but the secret is it must be clear solution not cloudy otherwise dispose of it safely.

I always use expired Bute tablets and never a issue with that one either...3 years is a max and then trash can here it comes.
I use so little of either above products my neighbor and I now purchase together...between the 2 of us and 8 horses we still throw out a lot of unused. that's a good thing actually.

If anyone knows any different on expired meds mentioned please speak up...
...
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post #4 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 09:50 AM
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Not that I am a proponent for use but I want to say it was Harvard (one of the big Ivy league at any rate) tested expired medications and found over 90% were still good after 15 years. I'd say that was likely pill form that was kept in climate controlled conditions. Liquids that are not in glass with air tight seals I would be wary of if they had been opened especially. Injectables would be one of the safest and for some they can be given orally with similar effect if you are in doubt about contamination but clear not cloudy makes sense. If you use only sterile needles and syringes then chance of contamination is low and the top reseals. I would not use if the integrity of that barrier were questionable.



You just don't know whether they have been kept under pristine conditions and if the weren't did exposure cause them to lose efficacy or increase in strength or have other changes that change the chemical structure. There are drugs known to degrade fairly quickly just because of the immediacy of action and would not be what is considered safe after the expiration. I googled that and nitroglycerin I was aware of, insulin and tetracycline were the big three. That says I would not keep any of the newer quick release unless they were individually sealed into protective packaging and even then I would not use if too far over the date.



I'd say that there is a comfortable past expiration date that is still useful if you know how the meds were kept but the longer expired the greater the chance of unexpected results. To me 3 years like hlg suggests is reasonable.
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Last edited by QtrBel; 08-11-2020 at 09:59 AM.
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post #5 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 10:31 AM
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We've had that discussion about dogs and ivermectin contamination of poop. If they have the gene that causes the sensitivity then the smaller the dog the more likely there will be serious reaction to eating poop balls. Larger dogs not so much of an issue unless they eat a large amount. Dogs without that sensitivity not an issue especially in larger dogs. My 40ish pound Aussie would have seizures if she got into poop after worming the horses.



Benadryl liquid is a good one to have on hand for horses as well.



The amount of fruits with pits a horse would have to consume to cause cyanide poison is not a small amount and they'd have to break that pit. they are more likely to break their teeth on the pit than the pit.



Yew is not something I ever used in landscaping because of the toxicity not just to horses but humans as well. The owner would have to be clear about the dangers and even then if they had kids I had always been able to convince them to use something else. I am the same with Oleander.



Horses don't typically go after plants that are toxic unless they do not have enough forage that satisfies their needs (both nutritionally and boredom wise). Fruit is typically not going to cause an issue for horses depending on the quantity they eat. You giving as a treat is fine, them gorging on windfall not good. That said there are those that develop tastes for things that they should not have so you may need to be vigilant. Bracken fern is one of the few toxic plants that horses will develop a taste for and actively seek out especially in the fall when it is still green and actively growing. They eat the leaves and tender shoots. Still takes a bit but the effect over time if they consistently eat it is a problem.

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post #6 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 11:13 AM Thread Starter
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Toxic Chemicals? Medications meant for other animals but toxic to horses?

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post #7 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 11:30 AM
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Ionophores (Monensin) in cattle feeds
Rodenticides (or other pesticides) - especially those that are sweetened or have grain bases as an attractant.
Herbicides (glyphosate and phenoxy herbicides) can change the palatibility of some plants making them attractive ( I think makes them sweeter and less bitter) so combined plant and chemical.
Aflatoxins in moldy corn or hay that in small amounts or of different types you could get away with feeding to cattle but would not want to feed your horse.

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post #8 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 11:44 AM
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I've heard chocolate can show up on drug tests for horses but I'm not sure if that's true, or why your horse would've eaten it.

I've never heard that onions are bad for dogs. Our dogs and cats will eat anything and often get the table scraps (there 3 large dogs and 2 cats and not that many scraps and never the super fatty kind or bones) and they WILL eat onions if they've got salad dressing on them or if they're cooked. Even the cats. Our cats will eat cucumbers, onions, salad...so long as it has dressing on it. The dogs will too.

Raw nightshade plants aren't supposed to be good for animals, especially not in large amounts. We used to have black nightshade (not the poisonous kind) in our fields and the horses and cows left it alone. The fruits of nightshade plants are safer but I wouldn't give them to animals (except maybe chickens) raw if I could help it. Especially if they're underripe. Then again, my grandma had a dog who would steal bell peppers from the garden and eat them and he was fine. He died of seizures but that was years later and probably didn't have anything to do with it.

My horse once ate a bunch of moldy beef cow pellets and was surprisingly fine. I'm thanking the Lord for that one.
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post #9 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 12:30 PM Thread Starter
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This is the kind of stuff I'm looking for. I'll be checking out the other chemicals mentioned.



Quote: The doses of ionophores normally used in feed for other animals can be highly toxic to horses. Cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, and the neurologic system are affected by ionophore toxicity. Changes in movement of ions across cell membranes can kill cells, and muscle cells are very susceptible to the toxic effects of ionophores. The most commonly used ionophores are monensin, lasalocid, and salinomycin.


https://ker.com/equinews/ionophore-toxicity-horses/

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post #10 of 41 Old 08-11-2020, 12:34 PM
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This from Banfield - The Toxic Plant: Allium

The Allium species include garlic, onions, leeks, scallions, chives and shallots. If your pet eats one of these products, red blood cells can be damaged, resulting in the cells not being able to carry oxygen. Ingestion can also cause anemia (low red blood cell count) and, in severe cases, the anemia may lead to internal organ damage, organ failure or even death.


Ingestions of onions or garlic of more than 0.5% of dog's body weight are potentially toxic. For example, this would equate to a 30 lb dog ingesting about 2.5 ounces of onion or garlic.






This is fresh, cooked, powdered, granulated... form doesn't matter. Damage can be cumulative. Same goes for horses eating it and why it is not recommended as a supplement for reducing pests in horses. Though I think in some supplements that may have been addressed or the amount fed is not at toxic levels. Having known someone that lost two dogs from feeding onions I don't take the chance.


In all things the dose is the poison.

Some horse people change their horse, they change their tack and discipline, they change their instructor; they never change themselves.
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