Gridwork & X-Country (Videos) - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 21 Old 07-03-2019, 07:19 AM
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You need a stronger base of support. Your leg is loose and the heels come up often. More time spent in the two point on the flat. Switching between two point, rising, sitting, stand two, sit two, ect. Over poles and cavalettis.

Grab mane with both hands over every single fence. You dont release and hook him in the mouth ever every fence. That's part of the reason his jump is awkward. He's protecting himself.

Do you notice when you walk over the cross country fence you move your body forward at the last minute? You're walking the fence, not jumping. Stay still, don't tip forward. Let your hands move forward to give him his head. He's less likely to trot away after.

Dressage saddle isn't doing any favours. You may also benefit from some half chaps. They give the leg more grip.
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post #12 of 21 Old 07-03-2019, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
You need a stronger base of support. Your leg is loose and the heels come up often. More time spent in the two point on the flat. Switching between two point, rising, sitting, stand two, sit two, ect. Over poles and cavalettis.
The dreaded legs...lol. I'll give those exercises a shot. Might do them on a trail if he's not being spooky.
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Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
Grab mane with both hands over every single fence. You dont release and hook him in the mouth ever every fence. That's part of the reason his jump is awkward. He's protecting himself.
That's the first thing the cross country instructor corrected. I'll remember that next time I do jumping :)


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Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
You may also benefit from some half chaps. They give the leg more grip.
I have a pair, I just never wear them. They seem so uncomfortable at the knees. They are leather though, so I probably just need to soften them.

Thanks for your advice
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post #13 of 21 Old 07-03-2019, 08:29 AM
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The half chaps may also be too tall for you. If they ride up behind your knee then they (just like tall boots) can be very uncomfortable and cause problems. The kids here walk, trot and canter in two point. It is one of the first things they do to help build strength and aid their balance. Once they have it down they move to two point over cavaletti - walk - trot then canter. They gripe and complain but it makes a difference when they finally advance to jumping.
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post #14 of 21 Old 07-03-2019, 02:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duskexx View Post
I have a pair, I just never wear them. They seem so uncomfortable at the knees. They are leather though, so I probably just need to soften them.
I find half chaps do need a little breaking in, just like tall boots. They may feel uncomfortable at first, but with a little riding they soften up and will crease in the places where your leg flexes and I find they're then perfectly comfortable.
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post #15 of 21 Old 07-03-2019, 02:54 PM
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As said above, the dressage saddle is not the best saddle to use to learn to jump in, but its what you have. You can try shortening your stirrups a few holes and that should help.

If there are polo wraps at the barn, wrap your lower leg with those as protection. Best is if they are pony size, horse wraps may be too bulky.
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post #16 of 21 Old 07-04-2019, 11:11 AM
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At the height your jumping the dressage saddle isn't a problem, you don't need to rush out and buy a new saddle.
I jumped ponies back in the day when junior riders all rode in jodhpur boots. No such thing as half chaps either.
Children in pony showing classes in the UK and Australia still have to wear short boots, so your lack of tall boots or chaps doesn't scream out to me as being a problem
If your legs are getting rubbed then buy some thick socks - you can always cut the feet out of them and use them like leg warmers.


Your stirrups do need to go up a hole or two, you're constantly reaching down for them and that's destabilizing your lower leg.


If you're worried about the horse hesitating before the jump then ride in a light half seat and stay in that position up too and over the jump - at that height you don't need to be too far out of the saddle anyway and the light half seat will allow you to have more driving power than 2 point, without getting left behind.


You're sitting back too soon - that's probably related to the long stirrups, you getting left behind on take off and a general loss of balance and you needing to build up strength in your core and thighs. That will come.


One thing that really stands out on your horse is how overdeveloped the underside of his neck is. That's not going to help him have a nice, fluid, forward action. Your dressage schooling will help with that so well done you for making the effort



Just winging it is not a plan
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post #17 of 21 Old 07-04-2019, 11:24 AM
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The dressage saddle is not really the issue, with those low jumps a dressage saddle is fine. I often preferred my dressage saddle to jump in as it kept me more stable on young horses I was training.

I think your issue goes back to an unsteady seat in general. It is nice that you are relaxed in your seat, but you are not gently sitting back down when posting, and really just letting the horse bounce you up and falling back down into the saddle.


I think the way you are just falling back into the saddle might be why the horse is hesitating at some jumps. He is getting hit in the back when you are trotting, cantering and especially when you are jumping.


Practice trotting more, so that you can gently return to the saddle, not bang into it. Strengthen your legs by riding two point in trot and canter.
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post #18 of 21 Old 07-04-2019, 06:23 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by AnitaAnne View Post
The dressage saddle is not really the issue, with those low jumps a dressage saddle is fine. I often preferred my dressage saddle to jump in as it kept me more stable on young horses I was training.

I think your issue goes back to an unsteady seat in general. It is nice that you are relaxed in your seat, but you are not gently sitting back down when posting, and really just letting the horse bounce you up and falling back down into the saddle.


I think the way you are just falling back into the saddle might be why the horse is hesitating at some jumps. He is getting hit in the back when you are trotting, cantering and especially when you are jumping.


Practice trotting more, so that you can gently return to the saddle, not bang into it. Strengthen your legs by riding two point in trot and canter.
Sorry, I'm going to sound like a complete idiot. But how are you supposed to post then? I've heard that posting using your knees is bad cos' it causes your legs to tense up, and you should use the horse's movement to sort of push you out of the saddle?

Also I think it could be a factor, but it's more like when a horse is looking at something that's scary, if that makes sense.

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post #19 of 21 Old 07-04-2019, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by duskexx View Post
Sorry, I'm going to sound like a complete idiot. But how are you supposed to post then? I've heard that posting using your knees is bad cos' it causes your legs to tense up, and you should use the horse's movement to sort of push you out of the saddle?

Also I think it could be a factor, but it's more like when a horse is looking at something that's scary, if that makes sense.
Good question. Its not that you are going up very wrong (but rather too high) its that you are plopping down on his back when going back to the sit phase.

The rider has to gently lower back down, and really the post is not an up and down movement, it is more moving one's hips forward towards the hands then gently back down. Shoulders should stay still.

At the canter (watch the video) you were thumping down on his back. Your bottom needs to either stay in the saddle at canter or stay out of it in two point. Not slam down every stride.

Focus on making your posting as close (low) to the saddle and gently sit back down. Once you can do that consistently, then work on rocking with the canter, not flopping up and down.

Really this is a common problem, but you seem to have a lot of potential, so these are things you can do to improve your seat.
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post #20 of 21 Old 07-04-2019, 06:55 PM
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Here is a video on posting the trot.

Notice how the riders only move their bottoms forward and out of the saddle, the shoulders stay level.

They gently sit on the down beat, not bounce down and up

http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_co...&v=3gnKYEK1EMM
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