Learning to Trot - The Horse Forum
 12Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 04:45 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 356
• Horses: 0
Learning to Trot

Hi could I please have some lovely advice on improving my trot :)

I really struggle with keeping my weight down, and also using my legs.

I'm not very good so please use small words!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-Eh...ature=youtu.be
Liligirl is offline  
post #2 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 05:29 AM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Plano, Texas
Posts: 1,692
• Horses: 0
Hello, Liligirl. In the video, you seem to be struggling to do a rising trot.

In a rising trot, the horse should be providing the energy to lift your body from the saddle. If the horse isn't providing this energy, you must either encourage the horse to do so or assume the sitting trot.

Were you preferring advice on the rising trot or the sitting trot?

Training riders and horses to work in harmony.
www.quietriding.com
www.quietriding.org
TXhorseman is offline  
post #3 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 05:38 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 356
• Horses: 0
Any advice would be welcome. I probably look to be struggling because I get out of time easily and normally end up behind her abit.
Liligirl is offline  
post #4 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 09:26 AM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Plano, Texas
Posts: 1,692
• Horses: 0
Some people feel it is easier to learn the rising trot before learning the sitting trot. I think this depends, in part, on how the horse is moving. It is easiest to ride rough or energetic trot by posting.

Unless you can get a livelier trot out of this horse, I would suggest trying the sitting trot first in order to better work on your balance. Then, you would have a better chance of learning to do a good rising trot. You would also have a better chance of getting a more active trot from this horse.

It appears that you are sitting too far back in the saddle. Try sitting in the middle of the saddle with your head balanced over your spine. There should be a basic vertical alignment of head over shoulders over hips over heels. Think of standing with your legs apart and knees slightly bent. A horse just happens to be between them.

With your pelvic bone vertical so you are sitting on your crotch as well as the seat bones, think of balancing your head over your spine rather than sitting erectly. If you relax your muscles, the bones of your spine should stack one above the other forming natural shock-absorbing curves. Your bones, rather than your muscles, will support your weight.

Next, release tension in the muscles around your pelvis, throughout your crotch area, all the way down your legs, and even throughout your ankles, feet, and toes. It may help to do this first with your feet out of the stirrups.

As you release your muscles, you should feel your seat sink deeply into the saddle. Gravity alone should rap your legs lightly around your horse without any squeezing on your part. It should feel as though your legs would drop to the ground if not attached.

If your feet are out of the stirrups, your toes will hang lower than your heels. If the balls of your feet are on the stirrups, the stirrups should support your feet without you pushing down. Gravity should pull your unsupported heels lower; don't worry about pushing them down.

Practice walking like this first and feel your body moving with your horse. Then, ask for the trot with a light squeeze and release of your legs. Don't forget the release or your muscles will be tight, and you want them relaxed.

If you are well balanced with a low center of gravity, you should not be thrown off balance when your horse begins to trot. If your arms and shoulders are relaxed, your hands should follow your horse's mouth, and you should not pull on the reins. If your muscles are relaxed, your seat should ascend and descent with your horse's back.

If you tighten the muscles in your crotch, your center of gravity will rise and your balance will become unstable. If you squeeze with your legs, you will block the flow of gravity as well as inhibit the movement of your body which should be following the movement of your horse. If you hold your breath, your muscles will tighten.

Remember, balance and relaxation are keys to good riding.
Foxhunter and bkylem like this.

Training riders and horses to work in harmony.
www.quietriding.com
www.quietriding.org
TXhorseman is offline  
post #5 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 12:58 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,224
• Horses: 0
is it just me or is that horse lame?
Foxhunter likes this.
CandyCanes is offline  
post #6 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 01:05 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Woodinville, Washington
Posts: 1,203
• Horses: 0
Yes, the horse does look lame. If it's your horse OP I wouldn't be riding at all until you figure out what's causing her to be off.

TXHorseman gives much better riding advice than I ever could, particularly if I'm not there in person. Relaxing is hard to do when you are just learning, but definitely key.
TessaMay is offline  
post #7 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 01:47 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 356
• Horses: 0
Where does she look lame please? Which leg and why? The ground we are riding on is not flat and she is not ridden much so not very fit. Sharp turns in a trot are hard for her and she wants to go into a canter for them if I don't let her slow to a walk. Also I'm not good with my legs and she pushes against it which I think makes her fall in.

Iv been having problems with her head tossing for a year. She has had teeth done and also vet check and a Chiro out. Everyone has said she is healthy and nothing wrong with her. She does it in the paddock so not tack.

But maybe you can see something that they missed?
Liligirl is offline  
post #8 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 02:08 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,224
• Horses: 0
Its in the front anyway, and she is limping quite a lot as far as I can see. She is not level , and does not look particularly happy. I think there is definitely something going on.
CandyCanes is offline  
post #9 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 02:46 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 356
• Horses: 0
I'm sorry I just don't see any limping. Bella is a very dominant mare, she is never happy with anything except scratches and being feed. She is a nervous horse and spooky. Iv had her off of grass completely the last week. I'll be honest in terms of getting her to sustain a trot this is the best Iv had. So for the last year she has not done any trotting with a rider except a few short trots on a straight.

The only time I see an issue is when we turn in. I don't feel that is lameness I feel it's as I explained before. Also my balance and terrible riding won't help an out of work horse keep balance on a sharp turn.

Unless you can specifically pin point the issue? Where in the video are you seeing this? Both Chiro and vet have said she is healthy but does have an attitude problem!
Liligirl is offline  
post #10 of 21 Old 01-23-2015, 03:47 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Woodinville, Washington
Posts: 1,203
• Horses: 0
Yes, it looks to be in the front. Look at the way she bobs her head off and on while she's trotting and seems to not want to put weight on her front feet? I see attitude problems and fitness issues as well, but I don't think that's the only thing there. JMO
TessaMay is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
English trot vs. German trot? Luce73 Horse Riding & Horse Activity 13 01-17-2014 12:19 PM
When learning to Trot should it be something to be nervous about? Shenee Horse Talk 30 03-29-2013 01:52 AM
Learning to post the trot. HighonEquine English Riding 2 10-09-2012 12:23 AM
Learning to Trot SpiritJordanRivers Horse Training 19 06-18-2010 06:33 PM
Is it correct to sit trot over trot poles? pcmum Horse Riding Critique 5 04-23-2009 10:24 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome