New and hopefully improved riding videos - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 17-04-2019, 11:56 PM Thread Starter
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New and hopefully improved riding videos

As promised, new videos of me riding both Hawk and my friends draftie mare Pearl 🙂 I hope you see the improvement as much as I do. As always looking for advice on where to improve! Hoping the links work, trying this on my phone for the first time

https://youtu.be/j7pJtBDqL7M

https://youtu.be/o-78WKknDw4

https://youtu.be/uBWOTEr0wcg

https://youtu.be/-u1vgUNiR58V
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post #2 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 09:18 AM
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Your legs generally look better!! Good work!

Your arms and hands still look stiff, and that is really annoying the horses. They are telling you that.

I don't break horses, I FIX them!
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post #3 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 10:56 AM
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Overall it looks like a solid training level ride.
You would do better to post THROUGH your hands and not break at your wrist to punish him on the bars of his mouth. You DO want a nice straight line from your elbow to his mouth. This will help you with the transitions and help with that little bit of tail swishing and I suspect him pulling on you.
Your leg looks good. I'd use it more at the girth rather than moving it back to give a cue in trot and carry a whip to back up your aid until he's responding properly.

He looks like a horse I'd spend 30 minutes walking on to get him soft and yielding. Little bits of lateral work with minimal pressure. You want him to learn to wait for you. He's got his head bent, but he's not through in the back. Rather he's rushing and the hips are just trailing behind. Start to mobilize the different parts of his body. Do turns on the forehand and practice keeping the shoulders where you want. Some leg yield and SI are also probably in order. I like to spend a few minutes with a rushy or stiff horse just "rolling their crest over" but be careful- if you are not actively listening to your horse and responding appropriately, this can turn into seesawing.

In your canter transitions it's a bit of a mess, which is fine and typical with something green, but you don't want rushing to become a habit. If he's just being a butt- ask nicely for your transition, and when he pulls that running thing goose him hard with your outside leg or give him a sharp tap with your whip. You want when you ask for canter to get an immediate response. So let your correction aid be large enough to get his attention and get him immediately into the canter so you can tell him right away what a good boy he is and reward him. Wash. Rinse. Repeat.

If he's unbalanced and can't get up into canter without running because he's physically not ready, that means you need to work on his response to your half-halts, your timing (so he has the best chance to go well when you give the cue.), And how you prepare him. This horse needs a lot of suppling work and to become loose in the back. Don't worry about his head. It won't fall off while you go back and fix his body.

Overall you have a nice seat and position and he's a neat horse whose making a good effort.
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post #4 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 11:25 AM
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Your hands are too 'fixed' and rigid - you need more elastic in them so you can allow him to go forwards into the bridle/into your hands without those little jabs in the mouth.
Think of your hands/reins/bit being like a barrier that you're going to ride the horse up too, if that barrier isn't clear and consistent then the horse gets confused. The bit (ideally) shouldn't be used as a brake.
You don't seat deep enough in the saddle which is why you have the tendency to hover above it and bounce around.
I imagine that's why they have you doing the bareback work ut its not really doing its job because you're gripping with your knees instead of allowing your leg to sink down which in turn will allow your seat the deepen.
When you grip with your knees the tension sets in, your leg and body start to pivot around the knee, then your lower leg is sliding too far back and your body is tilting forward.
That's putting your balance out and weakening your seat and leg
When you're leg slides back your 'driving heel' cues are too far back. That would confuse a horse that was trained to respond to a heel/leg behind the girth differently to how it responds to a heel/leg on the girth
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Just winging it is not a plan
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post #5 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 01:23 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greentree View Post
Your legs generally look better!! Good work!

Your arms and hands still look stiff, and that is really annoying the horses. They are telling you that.
This is sure tough to figure out! First they're too wide and noisy, now too still. Hmmm guess I've overcorrected?
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post #6 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 01:45 PM
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A few things you could improve on:

In the first 3 videos, you look like your sitting too far forward on your seat bones, creating a 'perched' position. This position, along with low hands, causes your upper body to come too forward and your seat to be less stable. It is also why you lose your balance when the horse's pace suddenly speeds up or down. This video explains where you should be on your seatbones:

You also have the tendency to ride with straight, stiff elbows and hands too low. It's hard to tell for sure, but It looks like you lifted your hands a bit in the last video and your position wasn't as perched. I think that lifting your hands, so that you have a bend in your elbow will also help prevent your upper body from tipping forward. To keep a supple elbow, you must allow your elbow to open/close with the horse's movement. This is what keeps a steady hand. For example, while you are rising the trot, your elbow opens and when you sit a stride, your elbow closes. At the canter, a horse's head goes down when the inside front lands and the head comes up when the outside hind lands. So, the elbow opens to allow the horse's head to move down and closes when the horse's head comes up. You can see that happening in this video:
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post #7 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 02:14 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lostastirrup View Post
Overall it looks like a solid training level ride.
You would do better to post THROUGH your hands and not break at your wrist to punish him on the bars of his mouth. You DO want a nice straight line from your elbow to his mouth. This will help you with the transitions and help with that little bit of tail swishing and I suspect him pulling on you.
Your leg looks good. I'd use it more at the girth rather than moving it back to give a cue in trot and carry a whip to back up your aid until he's responding properly.

He looks like a horse I'd spend 30 minutes walking on to get him soft and yielding. Little bits of lateral work with minimal pressure. You want him to learn to wait for you. He's got his head bent, but he's not through in the back. Rather he's rushing and the hips are just trailing behind. Start to mobilize the different parts of his body. Do turns on the forehand and practice keeping the shoulders where you want. Some leg yield and SI are also probably in order. I like to spend a few minutes with a rushy or stiff horse just "rolling their crest over" but be careful- if you are not actively listening to your horse and responding appropriately, this can turn into seesawing.

In your canter transitions it's a bit of a mess, which is fine and typical with something green, but you don't want rushing to become a habit. If he's just being a butt- ask nicely for your transition, and when he pulls that running thing goose him hard with your outside leg or give him a sharp tap with your whip. You want when you ask for canter to get an immediate response. So let your correction aid be large enough to get his attention and get him immediately into the canter so you can tell him right away what a good boy he is and reward him. Wash. Rinse. Repeat.

If he's unbalanced and can't get up into canter without running because he's physically not ready, that means you need to work on his response to your half-halts, your timing (so he has the best chance to go well when you give the cue.), And how you prepare him. This horse needs a lot of suppling work and to become loose in the back. Don't worry about his head. It won't fall off while you go back and fix his body.

Overall you have a nice seat and position and he's a neat horse whose making a good effort.
What does "posting through my hands" mean?

He was very "up" last night, kept trying to spook and blow fall in at the end of the arena with the open door. He did not want to walk quietly at all. At the beginning of the ride he was blowing off my leg entirely so I had to get after him with the whip. The problem with that is every time I have to use the whip he gets panicked and inverted. I've never misused it on him, can wave it all around and rub it all over him and he's fine. He's just overly dramatic when he's being corrected.
His lateral work is actually pretty good, I should have done more of it for this ride. The canter transitions are half rushed because he's anticipating and half because his back is weak and we're working on building it up. Basically after the first canter of every ride he spends the remainder of it trying to push his haunches in to step into it easier, so I have to do a lot of straightening after each canter and work on slowing his brain down again.
He tries so hard to please, slowing his brain down and getting him to think of what I'm asking is the biggest struggle we have as a pair. He's always anticipating and trying to do everything at 100MPH.
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post #8 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 02:29 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
Your hands are too 'fixed' and rigid - you need more elastic in them so you can allow him to go forwards into the bridle/into your hands without those little jabs in the mouth.
Think of your hands/reins/bit being like a barrier that you're going to ride the horse up too, if that barrier isn't clear and consistent then the horse gets confused. The bit (ideally) shouldn't be used as a brake.
You don't seat deep enough in the saddle which is why you have the tendency to hover above it and bounce around.
I imagine that's why they have you doing the bareback work ut its not really doing its job because you're gripping with your knees instead of allowing your leg to sink down which in turn will allow your seat the deepen.
When you grip with your knees the tension sets in, your leg and body start to pivot around the knee, then your lower leg is sliding too far back and your body is tilting forward.
That's putting your balance out and weakening your seat and leg
When you're leg slides back your 'driving heel' cues are too far back. That would confuse a horse that was trained to respond to a heel/leg behind the girth differently to how it responds to a heel/leg on the girth
I'm intentionally up off the saddle in the canter. He has a weak back so my trainer recommended I start doing the canter work in a light seat to help him lift and push off his hind better. I should've specified when I first posted.
Nobody is having me do bareback work, I jumped on the mare as a favor for my friend who was having trouble getting her to move out :) I don't ride bareback often and haven't been on that horse in years, it definitely affected my position negatively.
I 100% admit to not thinking about my legs as much as I should've during this ride. I was trying to create and active hind leg and get him starting to work more over his back. So much to try and do at once I honestly don't know how people do it but I'm trying my best.

I'm not sure what the best way to fix my hands is... first they were too wide and uneven, which I think I've fixed. Its my understanding that they should only move forward and back and never out to the side? I was trying to create steady contact for him, which I guess created stiffness in the process.
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post #9 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 02:42 PM
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I don't remember the prior videos, so can't make a comparison.


YOu are doing some of the exact same problems that I have, at times, in the canter; you are tight and pinching with the knee, and riding 'perched' over your pubic bone, and thus your upper body is tipped forward, and you are subject to being tipped forward, (with your knees as the fulcrum) when the horse slows unexpectedly. It makes you pop out of the saddle with each stride. It is an unstable position, and with the fixed elbows, and downward focus of your hand, it affects the hrose by making him wary of really reaching and moving forward. He is holding back, and becoming tense from this.


When you ride the draft horse, bareback, you sit very nicely and your hands are much better, and the horse is very honest to your contact. Would you be able to ride the chestnut without stirrups?
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post #10 of 14 Old 18-04-2019, 03:12 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
I don't remember the prior videos, so can't make a comparison.


YOu are doing some of the exact same problems that I have, at times, in the canter; you are tight and pinching with the knee, and riding 'perched' over your pubic bone, and thus your upper body is tipped forward, and you are subject to being tipped forward, (with your knees as the fulcrum) when the horse slows unexpectedly. It makes you pop out of the saddle with each stride. It is an unstable position, and with the fixed elbows, and downward focus of your hand, it affects the hrose by making him wary of really reaching and moving forward. He is holding back, and becoming tense from this.


When you ride the draft horse, bareback, you sit very nicely and your hands are much better, and the horse is very honest to your contact. Would you be able to ride the chestnut without stirrups?
Thanks Tinyliny, I am intentionally out of the saddle on the chestnut horse, it was recommended by my trainer to help him since he is currently weak in his lumbar region while he's building strength it supposed to make it easier for him to lift his back. Its definitely not stable for me in this saddle, the flap makes it impossible to get my legs in a good enough position to get up off his back effectively.

I really need to work on my hands, they went from too noisy to too still. He is a very tense horse, he does like his new Mullen mouth bit.

I can try riding him without stirrups.. he's prone to getting back sore and is very weak in his back already, so I'm trying to keep my weight up off his back to help him out. I don't want to make his back worse even if it does compromise my position.
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