Cantering Gaited Horses - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 27 Old 09-05-2019, 09:00 AM
Green Broke
 
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so glad you chimed in @evilamc and the videos were great. We took the same approach of cantering up hills my mare and now my daughters green mare. Now they will both canter on the flat with some encouragement.
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post #22 of 27 Old 09-05-2019, 06:14 PM
Green Broke
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carshon View Post
so glad you chimed in @evilamc and the videos were great. We took the same approach of cantering up hills my mare and now my daughters green mare. Now they will both canter on the flat with some encouragement.
Yes! I don't know if thats technically correct but it worked for Orianna! It was the easiest way I found to train it on the trail lol!
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post #23 of 27 Old 09-06-2019, 10:32 AM
Weanling
 
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Originally Posted by CopperLove View Post
@Idrivetrotters Since you mentioned training and taking a horse down to the low port Kimberwicke, I looked up some images of that type of bit and have never seen one in-person before. If someone is wanting to step down from a long-shanked bit on a horse they don't have training background on, is this what you would recommend? If so, since they seem difficult to find locally, do you happen to know of a reputable place online to order? And are there other bits I should consider trying as well?

I apologize for the overload of questions... I'm from an area where people specifically call the curb bits with long shanks "Walking Horse Bits", and while I have been aware pretty-much since I started that that wasn't the only option for a gaited horse, I've not been confident enough to go bit-hunting on my own and we've only recently discovered she seems to prefer the low-port curb over broken bit options. I am solely trail-riding, so my only concern is finding something she is comfortable in and that won't be confusing for her to transition to.
Got busy with work but here is my response. I love low port Kimberwicks for horses who have been in long shanks/leverage bits. These bits have just enough leverage that they feel it but not enough to make them nervous. They give nicely to these bits and are able to work with them. I've got mine off a few sites from ebay, FB groups, forums, or Stateline Tack is a great source if locally doesn't have them ( my guy wears a 5.5" so we have to get creative).

A few other bits for those who wear 5" bits, there are a few short shanked bits I like, but for reschooling I prefer the kimberwick so I can get them learning to reuse their bodies appropriately. Anything with a shank at that stage is counterproductive.

A history on the "Walking Horse Bit" was originally designed for Big Lick horses to keep them in control while performing in stacks, chains, and soring. For some odd reason the "Bigger the shank the better rider I am" became the mantra for many in the gaited world. To me, this is counterproductive as these gaits are bred into them and do not require much more than learning how to carry a rider to gait well. You want the horse to be working through their backs and there is no way for a horse to use their backs when in a hollow frame from the amount of pressure those shanks put on the horse.

Hope this helps!!!
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post #24 of 27 Old 09-06-2019, 11:05 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2019
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@Idrivetrotters Thank you, that helps tremendously! I'll have to measure or ask what size bit we've been using. I might be able to find one in person about an hour away, there was a tack shop in the city I bought my helmet in that had a wider variety of options in bits but I didn't know as much about them then (an honestly didn't even know my horse was gaited at that point.)

I looked up what a Big Lick horse was, I wasn't familiar with that term. I know everyone has their own methods and opinions but... in my novice opinion, I think the kinds of people who use those kinds of methods to get a horse to perform are exactly the kind of people who don't need a big shanked bit in their hands.

Yesterday evening when I went to practice I did get to experience her walking gait and it was lovely. She was a lot more relaxed I think largely due to the fact that I was much more relaxed. It was a much shorter ride so I wasn't as tired and tight in he saddle. I'll be really interested to see how she does with a kimberwicke. It sounds like something that might be a lot better off for us at this point, at least something I'd really like to try.
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"I am the one thing in life I can control. I am inimitable I am an original. Iím not falling behind or running late. Iím not standing still I am lying in wait." - Wait For It
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post #25 of 27 Old 09-06-2019, 06:49 PM
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@CopperLove I won't derail this thread with the soring etc but yeah, it is a horrendous racket. I had one we got from auction with stacks that weighed 15lbs (had lead in the bottom also) and scars that were really bad. He was hit over the head (called stewarding so they don't flinch when inspected or a bigger hurt happens) to the point he had a healed fracture and was incredibly head shy. I could go for days on how bad this is but I'll save everyone from that. The current "WGC" the rider/trainer just got 18 months suspension for soring yet he won the title. They flaunt it when they get tickets as the USDA can't do much to really punish them.
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post #26 of 27 Old 09-06-2019, 11:37 PM
Weanling
 
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@Idrivetrotters That's horrid 😞

Hopefully I've not taken the thread too off-topic - I jumped onto natural collection and bits, but it's been very helpful to me in understanding some things including how a gaited horse would be cantered. Hopefully the OP has found some helpful info too!

"I am the one thing in life I can control. I am inimitable I am an original. Iím not falling behind or running late. Iím not standing still I am lying in wait." - Wait For It
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post #27 of 27 Old 09-09-2019, 06:49 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
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A gaited horse can canter just like any other breed. With proper training they can be cantered on a loose rein as well as in collection. There are lots of myths and mis-information out there about how a gaited horse must be ridden or trained. Much of this has been created by the gaited horse show world, which in some cases uses some very unconventional training methods. I start & train a gaited horse just like any other breed. I donít use any special bits and gimmicks that are associated with gaited breeds. They are primarily ridden on a loose rein unless I am asking something from them that may require collection. In the past I have even used a few gaited horses for cow/ranch work and they can do anything other breeds can do if trained properly.
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