English Riding vs. Western Riding - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
 56Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 32 Old 02-08-2018, 10:37 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 8,228
• Horses: 1
Contact doesn't necessarily mean the horse is bracing against the bit, oh my goodness >.>
Golden Horse likes this.

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
Zexious is offline  
post #22 of 32 Old 02-08-2018, 11:18 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: southern Arizona
Posts: 11,948
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueSpark View Post
A close contact english saddle is significantly less secure than say you average western, dressage or Aussie...
I'm not certain that is true. A former moderator, Maura, told me years ago she started horses in a close contact saddle because that is what she has spent many years using, and all her reflexes and balance were based on riding a forward seat in a close contact saddle.

If someone is a total beginner, then a western saddle is probably easier to stay in when things go bad. My Australian saddle - the one I used to stay alive while learning to ride a very spooky Arabian mare - was very secure for a beginning rider. More so than a western saddle! During the first 6 months, the poleys on the Aussie saddle left bruises on my thighs from being slammed into them - but they kept my hips aligned with my horse and saved my butt.

Once I got used to riding a forward seat in an Aussie saddle, I also stopped making contact with the poleys. It just didn't happen during the next 5 years or so. Then I switched to a western saddle...and for a time, I found it harder to stay solidly with my horse. In a forward seat, "security" comes from low heels and the lower leg - not the seat. The wider tree and all the leather under the knee made it hard to use my lower leg the way I had learned.

Switching to this western saddle made it harder still:



The leather is slicker than snot on a door knob. The bucking rolls have disappeared. I concluded they were too small and too far forward to be of much use. Sheepskin - a.k.a. butt velcro - has helped with the slickness, but makes it even wider:



Of course, there are western saddles designed to make it easier to stay on when things go wrong. But HOW a rider approaches riding counts for a lot. For a totally new rider, I think an Aussie saddle with a horn is darn hard to beat for keeping a new rider on:



But I also think a rider who learns English-only may well be more secure in an English saddle, and a rider who learns western western-only may well be more secure in a western saddle. Our habit patterns - how our body has learned to respond in the first split second of a spook - is a huge part of staying on.

I consider myself a western rider now, but I fully understand how an English rider in a close contact saddle, legs all around the horse, could find it easier to stay on in a jump saddle than a western one. I sold my two English saddles some years back. The horse I ride now is a fundamentally easier horse to ride, and I've also learned a lot more about recognizing when things are ABOUT to go bad - and backing off before the explosion happens. I'm thinking about getting another English saddle for use trail riding.

BTW - when people discuss western vs English, most focus on the saddle. I think a bigger difference is in how one is encouraged to use the reins. In English, the more advanced you are, the more you take up contact. With western, the more advanced you are, the less contact is used.

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
bsms is online now  
post #23 of 32 Old 02-08-2018, 05:03 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,472
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zexious View Post
Contact doesn't necessarily mean the horse is bracing against the bit, oh my goodness >.>
I can't find the original quote but I agree with you.
Oh my goodness.
Golden Horse and SwissMiss like this.

Quantity does not mean quality.
updownrider is online now  
post #24 of 32 Old 02-08-2018, 05:19 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,100
• Horses: 2
I prefer English because the barn that I took lessons at when I first started riding was English. So that's what I've done for seventeen years (sidenote: omg that sounds crazy!). All I wanted to do was ride, I didn't care about the kind of saddle or style as long as I got to be around horses!

Since starting I have ridden both ways and don't feel that one is easier than the other. If anything western seems more difficult just because I am unfamiliar, which makes sense. I feel most secure in my dressage saddle as that's what I usually ride in and it fits me better than my AP. I have done a little in a western saddle here and there, and I would not be opposed to western for trails and whatnot - if only I could afford it! ;) I think Nav would be super cute as a western horse.
Woodhaven likes this.
NavigatorsMom is offline  
post #25 of 32 Old 02-08-2018, 09:33 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,020
• Horses: 0
think what type of riding you want to do plays a big part. I ride both English & western. English riding is still fairly new to me ,but finding it easier in some respects....well except for getting my one diagnol correct ,lol. The having more contact with my horse is easier to "hold him" together. My horse is training for western pleasure & it is actually more work to be able support him with my leg & seat to keep him driving from behind, lifting himself in having self carriage on loose rein . Another note is todays performance western saddles are close contact,they do not have that extra leather under your leg like they once did.

There are Horse Crazy People,then there is Crazy People with horses...Know the Difference !!
paintedpastures is offline  
post #26 of 32 Old 02-09-2018, 11:31 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 8,228
• Horses: 1
@updownrider - Post #16 x.x

@paintedpastures - You seem to have the opposite experience than most people on this thread, which is interesting. Nearly everyone seems to find their preferred (or just the one they've been taught) discipline to be somewhat easier and more comfortable, likely just due to muscle memory and exposure.
I can definitely say that "holding a horse" together really isn't the goal in English, so it may be a matter of nuance--doing something correctly one way (in western), and therefore finding it more difficult and nuanced, and doing something incorrectly in another, and finding it simple by default.
bsms likes this.

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
Zexious is offline  
post #27 of 32 Old 02-09-2018, 01:20 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,472
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zexious View Post
@updownrider - Post #16 x.x
Thanks.

Quantity does not mean quality.
updownrider is online now  
post #28 of 32 Old 02-09-2018, 03:29 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 2,663
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
sometimes I feel , when riding a western trained horse, as if Im on a ski slope with nothing in front of me, and i'll just fall off the front, the hrose's head is so low!
that was exactly my feeling when I was riding my friend's QH (showing WP) - coming from my Peruvian, which has a naturally high head set. There was just "nothing" in front of me
SwissMiss is online now  
post #29 of 32 Old 02-09-2018, 10:40 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,020
• Horses: 0
@paintedpastures - You seem to have the opposite experience than most people on this thread, which is interesting. Nearly everyone seems to find their preferred (or just the one they've been taught) discipline to be somewhat easier and more comfortable, likely just due to muscle memory and exposure.
I can definitely say that "holding a horse" together really isn't the goal in English, so it may be a matter of nuance--doing something correctly one way (in western), and therefore finding it more difficult and nuanced, and doing something incorrectly in another, and finding it simple by default.[/QUOTE]

@Zexious obvious my description of what I mean by holding it together isn't understood or the best for terminology perhaps better to say keeping or maintaining him travelling forward & correct would be better way to describe.

Just find that riding English because of I have more contact with horse. The riding more forward,plus using 2 hands & being able to have that light contact to be able hold him & push him up with my legs until he rounds & is driving forward from behind rather than strung out /hollow & on forehand.Comparing to western pleasure were horse is ridden on more of a drape rein & slower gait keeping him correct, & driving forward when you are sitting deeper in saddle & maintaining that with primarily your legs/seat can be harder.

There are Horse Crazy People,then there is Crazy People with horses...Know the Difference !!
paintedpastures is offline  
post #30 of 32 Old 02-10-2018, 05:44 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,061
• Horses: 2
I just want to reiterate that it shouldn't matter what tack you're using. If you're truly riding and not just a passenger you shouldn't feel insecure in any tack or even in no tack at all. Different disciplines aren't as different as some riders seem to think. I started out riding Western. In my Western lessons I was taught to use my seat and leg, to use my core to balance, to ride two handed and one handed. I was even taught how to get up off the horse's back if I had to jump a small obstacle on the trail. I was given frequently stirrupless or even bareback lessons to develop an independent seat. I was never allowed to touch the horn or use my saddle as a crutch in any way.

My transition to English was uneventful. I never felt insecure in any type of English saddle. After I started taking dressage lessons I only realized how similar the disciplines truly are, if ridden appropriately. I've had innumerable dressage lessons on the buckle or without reins at all. Neck rening, or simply being able to move your horse off your leg is a skill important to all disciplines. Being able to balance yourself instead of using your saddle as a crutch is a skill important to all disciplines. English riders bracing on the reins and Western riders bracing on the saddle are bad habits all the same. No English horse should be bracing on the bit and no Western horse should be uncollected, unbalanced and falling on the forehand. Every horse should be engaged, driving from behind, and responding to light contact from the reins.

As I'm taking dressage lessons I can hear my Western riding instructor's voice in my head. She and my dressage and event instructors say a lot of the same things. Things might look a little different or feel a little different for someone who's never experienced one or the other but the end game is always the same. Maybe this is why Western dressage is gaining such popularity? I ride at a mixed discipline barn and we all actually take lessons from the same collection of instructors.

Personally, I prefer English. I feel better having the freedom of movement and the softer seat that my AP saddle has vs the typical Western saddle. I also like having a lighter and more portable saddle for travel and hoisting up onto a tall horse. I prefer riding in breeches over jeans as well. I'm the bum that wears sweats and work out clothes everywhere. Jeans are stiff and uncomfortable for me, while breeches are comfortable enough to take a nap in! I will gladly ride in either style though. I ultimately love both disciplines.

kiltsrhott is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Paddock vs. Pasture vs. Pen vs. Field vs. everything else SamanthaB Horse Talk 14 02-23-2016 04:53 PM
Senior Glo vs. MoorGlo vs. Equilete vs. Equipeak Momofahorselover Horse Nutrition 4 08-20-2012 01:27 PM
Vet vs. Farrier vs. Chiro vs. DieselPony Horse Talk 5 08-28-2010 02:58 AM
barrel vs reining vs cutting vs western saddle Fowl Play Western Riding 7 03-15-2010 07:09 PM
Western riding vs. English riding. SonnyWimps Horse Riding & Horse Activity 4 04-04-2008 05:24 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome