Help convincing my parents to let me get a horse? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 20 Old 01-10-2019, 07:56 PM
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Other than the already posted, I find the best way for a youth to show their dedication to owning a horse, is to take on the financial responsibility of covering the expenses yourself. If you are interested in owning one, then I would suggest to look at finding work locally on the weekends or after school and financially supporting yourself through this journey.
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post #12 of 20 Old 01-10-2019, 08:03 PM
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I will be honest... I had a part time job at Jamesway (It was kind of like a walmart). I made about 100 dollars per week. I made weekly payments on Pistol, his total cost was $500. It was my entire paycheck each week and I didn't tell my parents that I bought him until I had to find a place to keep him! Even then - I made the arrangements, I paid for his keep.

They did have to help me with the vet bills. I didn't think about that. I was lucky though becayse for the first 10 or 15 years he was just farrier and shots...

My dad even bought my first horse trailer for me. He paid $600 for it.... I was kind of shocked that he bought it. I didn't even ask him too...

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post #13 of 20 Old 01-10-2019, 08:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84 View Post
I will be honest... I had a part time job at Jamesway (It was kind of like a walmart). I made about 100 dollars per week. I made weekly payments on Pistol, his total cost was $500. It was my entire paycheck each week and I didn't tell my parents that I bought him until I had to find a place to keep him! Even then - I made the arrangements, I paid for his keep.

They did have to help me with the vet bills. I didn't think about that. I was lucky though becayse for the first 10 or 15 years he was just farrier and shots...

My dad even bought my first horse trailer for me. He paid $600 for it.... I was kind of shocked that he bought it. I didn't even ask him too...
Wonderful, however I'm sure it's not advised to "buy the horse on your own and tell your parents after" as a go to lol! So glad it worked out in this situation. But just in case the OP thinks this is the way to go, first of all, you can't legally buy him as a minor. Your parents may make a big stink and make you give him back. Also, as is said the purchase price is the cheap part! I lost a 6 year old cat to kidney disease last year, perfectly healthy and low maintenance until around 5 then the past year her kidneys just stopped (we assume she was born with bad kidneys) that was a significant amount of effort and resources, mostly financial. I also have a dog who is relatively healthy who has been on very expensive and heavy duty seizure meds after a completely normal first 7 years of his life. Not to mention any sudden and one time expenses (same dog for the first time in his life ate something and had foreign body surgery at 13 years old, which affected his liver causing him to overdose on his phenobarbital and go into a coma a few days after he came home from that!!!).

So I genuinely think it was wonderful that farmpony was able to do that, but...please don't. The likelyhood of it not working out is VERY high.

I DO love the idea of working and saving up money. If/when you do get a horse it will be put to good use. It's a good idea anyways. And, it will prove to your p arents how serious you are. This is assuming youre old enough!
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post #14 of 20 Old 01-10-2019, 09:00 PM
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FWIW, I am not a minor and just moved back in with my parents recently. I brought a mare I already owned with me (to add to the four already here from before I moved out). This was a horse I owned and payed for and she was boarded rough board/self care an hour away, not too many other options!

However, one of the four here was not technically owned by us and when the owner decided to sell him and I wanted to take on ownership of him as he'd been under my care for 15 years my mother threw a FIT about how it was "her barn" and "her place" etc etc etc. Definitely a source of contention as I am an adult and would be taking full responsibility for him including financial and he'd been here FIFTEEN years so it wasn't really changing anything whatsoever.

Just to give some insight, it's a lot more complicated than one might think.
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post #15 of 20 Old 01-11-2019, 01:20 PM
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Have they given you reasons on why they wouldn't? Do you have a job?

I personally would not take the horse...as tempting as it may be, a LOT goes into horse ownership. Vet bills (which half the time are unexpected!), farrier, dental work, etc...the list goes on & on.

You may have to get a companion for the horse too. That's also something to consider.

Waiting for the OP to respond to this thread, as we want some answers!
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post #16 of 20 Old 01-11-2019, 01:46 PM
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While we wait.


Two years. Tis a bit grandiose to say that's a long time.

I know people who have ridden their entire lives who would never consider even their time in the saddle 'a long time'. Most are humble enough to admit they are still learning. At 2 years, you, OP... and I (though I know it) know just enough to get into real trouble.

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."
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post #17 of 20 Old 01-11-2019, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
While we wait.


Two years. Tis a bit grandiose to say that's a long time.

I know people who have ridden their entire lives who would never consider even their time in the saddle 'a long time'. Most are humble enough to admit they are still learning. At 2 years, you, OP... and I (though I know it) know just enough to get into real trouble.

Could be waiting a while, we may again crushed a youngsters dream with the cold light of reality...

I see on another thread that at least 18 months of the two years were once a week lessons...

If you are a youngster reading this, because you’re in the same situation, we really, really do sympathize. When I was young I would have done anything for a horse of my own, I guess there are more adults here who wished a prayed for a horse every day, than were lucky enough to own one....if you are a city kid, even more so.

Thing is while we do understand, we also understand that riding for two years does not make you a trainer, if you’re only able to ride once a week, then it barely makes you out of the beginners class. No shame in being a beginner, we all were, but horses and horse people will catch you on pretending to be what you are not.

Biggest thing, be honest, be honest about your experience, your ability. The. Be honest about the cost of a horse, the keep of it, not the “hope it will only cost this” but reality checks...I bought a horse in September, was not actually thinking that she would need more blankets, but she did....and front shoes, and chiropractor, and she has had two minor injuries that needed the vet.....these things happen.

So talking to parents, you need to be honest, and if it can’t work, start saving now, so you can buy in the future.

“Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity”
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post #18 of 20 Old 01-11-2019, 02:52 PM
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First, I’m going to ask how old you are and what your future aspirations are. University?

Don’t get me wrong, I love my horses, but there have been many times I wished I had waited until later in life simply because I have been tied down & lost opportunities I would have otherwise been able to go for.

I’ve had my first horse since I was 15 and am In my 20’s now. Not going to lie, it caused some strain between my parents ( who aren’t into horses) and because my parents ( bearing finicial responsibility) didn’t realize how expensive owning a horse was initially. It also took away alot of time from both my studies, family and friends.
The real downside though was when I started paying myself and went to university. I stayed home because it was difficult & expensive to move my horse ( who was having respiratory & hoof issues at the time), then realized that I wanted to go to other universities that had more diverse options than home. Plus I had to pay more towards my horse at this time which added to the stress. It was also very difficult to juggle both university, work and my horse.

Other friends of mine tried horse ownership short term and found the same thing. Most ultimately decided to sell and lease instead until their finicial income was stabilized. This allowed them the freedom to do what they wanted (working student position, travel for education etc) without having to worry about their horse and coming up with the money. One friend who is making good money at the moment decided the same because now she is working a ton of hours and said that even though she is making the money to own one, she wouldn’t be able to make the time.

Now that I’m paying on my own, I completely understand why my parents initially did not want to get me a horse. Board alone is expensive here ($400 for no indoor and 24/7 turnout) and It’s not even the highest I’ve seen. Then, you add in farrier ($30-200), vet ($$$), feed, tack, etc and wish for the best. It’s lucky if you just have maintenance vet bills, but often, a horse will have issues that demand extra vet care. You don’t even want to know how much emergency fees can cost.

Now, if your future aspirations line up with owning or your able to being yourself to sell later on down the road, then owning a horse might be good for you. However, if your parents are paying and are strongly against it, then I would wait until you can pay yourself. Your already privledged with plenty of great riding opportunities and really, owning a horse isn’t going to present much more opportunity than being able to bond, get a bit more saddle time & have a horse trained completely by your preferences.
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post #19 of 20 Old 01-11-2019, 03:52 PM
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@Jolly101 has a really good point here. If your future plans are College/University now is not the time to get a horse. I grew up with horses and had 2 when it came time for me to go to college my parents refused to take on care of the horses (even though we own acreage) it was just too much work for something they had no interest in. I had to sell 1 horse and arranged for a friend of mine to keep his horse here and take care of my other horse while I was away. Friend got tired of taking care of our horses and moved his out. I had to make other arrangements for my horse (boarding) and could hardly afford to keep her and very rarely got to ride during the school year.

My daughter is currently a sophomore in college - and has a 22 yr old horse here at home. This horse is starting to have some health issues that may limit its riding in the next couple of years. My husband and I had to sit our daughter down and tell her that we will not be replacing this horse, or taking over the care for a replacement. We have 3 horses of our own and taking care of 4 horses is quite expensive and we do not wish to add another. She was upset but understood that she will be out of school soon and getting a horse now and not knowing where she will live and what her financial situation will be after she graduates is not the best plan for taking on a horse of her own
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post #20 of 20 Old 01-11-2019, 03:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
While we wait.


Two years. Tis a bit grandiose to say that's a long time.

I know people who have ridden their entire lives who would never consider even their time in the saddle 'a long time'. Most are humble enough to admit they are still learning. At 2 years, you, OP... and I (though I know it) know just enough to get into real trouble.
I have to agree. 2 years isn't very long. Not doubting the OP's abilities or knowledge, but in the horse world, 2 years isn't too long.
I've been riding for about 11-12 years and I am still learning. You have to be humble!

Owning a horse isn't something I even thought about for YEARS. I just got my first horse in May, and I made sure I was ready for it, especially financially.

Me personally, I wouldn't want my parents to have to pick up the slack for me for my horse.

I think the OP should wait to get a horse, yeah, it sounds convenient that they are willing to give you their horse since they're moving, but I just don't think it's a good idea.

Ride more, worry less.
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