Horse stumbling - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 01:00 AM Thread Starter
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Horse stumbling

Yesterday went for my lesson and had a really bad day, horse stumble and hurt both front legs. When I fell down and look back, both front legs are bleeding real bad. My instructor said this also happened to another horse not long ago, is it because of the riders fault or the horse simple isn’t fit enough? I feel really bad though, first time happened to me.
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post #2 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 02:46 AM
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Sometimes this can happen because of a farrier leaving the toes too long when the horse's hooves are trimmed or shod. If it's happening to different horses that are all looked after by the same farrier, that might be the cause.

Sometimes, it's caused by the horse travelling so heavy on its front end that it loses its balance. That can be because of the rider, the horse, or a combination of both.

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post #3 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 03:10 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony View Post
Sometimes this can happen because of a farrier leaving the toes too long when the horse's hooves are trimmed or shod. If it's happening to different horses that are all looked after by the same farrier, that might be the cause.

Sometimes, it's caused by the horse travelling so heavy on its front end that it loses its balance. That can be because of the rider, the horse, or a combination of both.
I’ll have a look at the horse’s hooves when I go for my next lesson, this happened when I’m cantering, so I think chances of me putting too much weight to the front is low because I’m leaning to the back. If it’s really because of the horse not fit enough, I’ll be really scared to ride other school horses since this is already the secone horse. I wanted to show by march and now I don’t think I’ll be showing since they don’t have enough horses already.
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post #4 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 06:09 AM
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There are also medical conditions that can cause this...but 2 horses, not the same horse is weird.
It may be the horses feet need to be seen by a qualified farrier sooner or there could also be issues again that you have no control over.
If you hear/see another incident such as this...I would be searching for a new barn.
I'll give benefit of doubt once, twice but if it occurs again you strike out with me.
I cherish my safety to much to ride horses that are falling down injuring themselves and soon it will also be riders..that is inexcusable in a lesson horse who needs to be sure-footed and able to carry a rider, a learning rider safely.
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post #5 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 07:27 AM
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Couple be a couple things... improperly trimmed feet, foot pain, heavy on the forehand, or deep footing. Based on what you describe, its probably their feet being too long combined with how they are ridden. If they fell and bloodied their legs, I'd guess the footing isn't that deep.
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post #6 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 08:43 AM
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I was going to suggest deeper footing as well but holes can cause stumbles. Maybe uneven ground. Could also be hooves or fitness level.
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post #7 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 08:06 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
Couple be a couple things... improperly trimmed feet, foot pain, heavy on the forehand, or deep footing. Based on what you describe, its probably their feet being too long combined with how they are ridden. If they fell and bloodied their legs, I'd guess the footing isn't that deep.
Initially I thought it’s bad footing, but the ground is levelled and we’re the first one using the paddock for that day.
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post #8 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 08:11 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
There are also medical conditions that can cause this...but 2 horses, not the same horse is weird.
It may be the horses feet need to be seen by a qualified farrier sooner or there could also be issues again that you have no control over.
If you hear/see another incident such as this...I would be searching for a new barn.
I'll give benefit of doubt once, twice but if it occurs again you strike out with me.
I cherish my safety to much to ride horses that are falling down injuring themselves and soon it will also be riders..that is inexcusable in a lesson horse who needs to be sure-footed and able to carry a rider, a learning rider safely.
<img style="max-width:100%;" src="https://www.horseforum.com/images/smilies/runninghorse2.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Runninghorse2" class="inlineimg" />...
I’ll need to discuss with other trainers to see what is really going on, cuz they are already the best stable in the whole country, so I don’t feel like changing barn. It’s unfortunate that I don’t have any video footage when that happened, I’m cantering to the right so I really don’t think it’s because I put too much weight to the front.
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post #9 of 11 Old 02-11-2019, 09:04 PM
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horses trip. They just do, sometimes, for no particular reason. Often it's because they've gotten lazy and are not lifting their feet well. They're just 'slogging' along, and they just stub the hoof into the ground and go down. This has happened to me twice, over the years, where I then was thrown hard into the ground. It is hard on one's confidence, becuase you then fear the next time. And, it can happen; anywhere, anytime.

But, if your horse is moving forward with energy and not too heavy on the front from being lazy, it is less likely to happen.
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post #10 of 11 Old 02-12-2019, 12:10 PM
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Agree with Tiny. They can and do trip. Sometimes it's because they're not paying attention, but on autopilot if you will.

I've found some of ours sometimes do this baloney on purpose when we're leaving out, but on the way back, they're surefooted as a mountain goat...

And yes, it could be the rider not being neutral in the saddle, or a combination of all of the above.

If joint issues, like a bum knee, or hoof/farrier issues, are ruled out, I'd go with lack of paying attention and/or faking it to get out of work. If faking it, I doubt the horse intended to get himself banged up, that could have been completely by accident.... as in he faked a little too hard, if that makes sense.

Throw in a rider that might have been caught off guard by the stumble or didn't know how correct their weight distribution correctly in that split second, then yes, it could have taken the horse to his knees.

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