Lateral Movement Order - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 01-03-2020, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
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Lateral Movement Order

Note: I know that not all of these maneuvers are technically lateral, but I am addressing them as such for simplicity's sake.

In what order do you teach these lateral movements?

- Leg Yield
- Half-Pass
- Side-Pass
- Shoulder In
- Travers
- Renvers
- Pirouettes

Thank you.

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post #2 of 7 Old 01-03-2020, 11:50 PM
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Usually-
Leg yield first then legyield along a fence which leads to Shoulder in. Followed by a mix of trevers and renvers, then half pass and the walk pirrouette. But you never quit schooling any of them or trying to make them better, since one movement is the mother of the next and most can be done to some degree in all three gaits. Some horses find certain ones easier than others so it helps to be patient and never force the movement in such a way that the horse feels trapped (some horses have a hard time with legyield facing a rail and feel claustrophobic.... I've just skipped it in that case. It's not worth adding the stress in an exercise that is supposed to make SI easier )

Note- working in hand I've gone from shoulder in straight to teaching half pass since it seems to be an easier brain and body shift for the horse. Then once a baby half pass is there and the idea of moving in the direction of bend is established I work on the renvers and trevers and shoulder in (first,)
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post #3 of 7 Old 01-04-2020, 12:57 AM
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My coach uses counterflexion before any true lateral, because for a balanced counterflexion, the horse has to bring the outside hind in underneath the body. This is the very beginnings of lateral work.

My mare's leg yield and shoulder in have massively improved since my coach introduced to me the idea of counterflexion.

I've taught my mare a lot of things "out of order", for instance she does walk pirouettes but not travers or renvers haha. I find that a lot of the time, the order things are asked for in dressage tests is a fairly decent indication of the order they should be trained in. After all, the levels are meant to be different points in the training of the Grand Prix (proper) dressage horse, are they not? Though I do think reinback should be demanded much sooner, because it's an invaluable training aid. It's actually a button I put on breakers before I even ask them for trot!

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post #4 of 7 Old 01-05-2020, 01:26 AM
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I normally teach side-pass first (from the ground) and introduce under saddle, so that they understand sideways movement, then introduce leg yield by teaching sideways-forward.

I introduce shoulder in after the leg yield, as I sometimes use leg yield as a correction for shoulder in (If they come off the rail). Then, It depends, but usually I'll teach travers and renvers and half pass when they understand those and shoulder in. Shoulder in makes it easier to introduce half pass and they also need to understand how to maneuver their haunches at this point.

The walk pirouettes are usually introduced at the end or in between.
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post #5 of 7 Old 01-05-2020, 02:37 AM
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Originally Posted by blue eyed pony View Post
Though I do think reinback should be demanded much sooner, because it's an invaluable training aid. It's actually a button I put on breakers before I even ask them for trot!
I would respectfully disagree - in cases when the rider isn’t at least an advanced intermediate (like myself, generously a weak intermediate). Reinback can teach them to use reverse as an evasion, which is difficult to correct for recreational riders and can be downright dangerous on trails.

I got myself into a lot of trouble with a horse like that. It was a trail horse at a commercial trail outfit which I was riding for the first (and the last) time. She was a lovely horse but she would balk and start reversing full tilt if she didn’t like something. Any attempt by me to get her forward was interpreted as “go faster backwards”. Trying to bend her was even worse. This was a rather challenging trail, with steep drops and a lot of bends and I was completely out of my depth and in a very dangerous situation. We could have fallen down a cliff face. Since then I stay away from reversing under saddle - I just don’t have the skills to teach that in a safe manner.
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post #6 of 7 Old 01-05-2020, 03:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Horsef View Post
I would respectfully disagree - in cases when the rider isn’t at least an advanced intermediate (like myself, generously a weak intermediate). Reinback can teach them to use reverse as an evasion, which is difficult to correct for recreational riders and can be downright dangerous on trails.

I got myself into a lot of trouble with a horse like that. It was a trail horse at a commercial trail outfit which I was riding for the first (and the last) time. She was a lovely horse but she would balk and start reversing full tilt if she didn’t like something. Any attempt by me to get her forward was interpreted as “go faster backwards”. Trying to bend her was even worse. This was a rather challenging trail, with steep drops and a lot of bends and I was completely out of my depth and in a very dangerous situation. We could have fallen down a cliff face. Since then I stay away from reversing under saddle - I just don’t have the skills to teach that in a safe manner.
Yeah, my mare tried that too. But training reinback doesn't teach them to do it to evade. The aids are totally different. If a horse is going to run backwards as an evasion they're going to run backwards as an evasion no matter what you do or what the training was before or after. In fact, having a good reinback helps train horses NOT to use running backwards as an evasion. They try it, you just send them backwards until they're begging to stop and go forwards. In general, my philosophy is, you do something I haven't asked for, you can keep doing it until I say you can stop.

Where that gets dangerous is when they're also popping rearing into the equation.

Obviously you do not do this in dangerous terrain. But it does work.

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post #7 of 7 Old 01-05-2020, 06:10 AM
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On the ground training and then undersaddle. When I broke babies how we did it.

Turn on the forehand, moving the shoulders (not turn on the forehand or a walk pirouette), go, stop, reinback, and leg yield are all things I like to teach a new horse within the 1st month undersaddle.

Shoulder in then Travers (haunches in), renvers (counter flexed haunches in), half pass then pirouettes.


Note: A walk pirouette is ridden with all 4 legs leaving the ground. The foots must NEVER stick. So a lot of times when I train and school a walk pirouette, I rarely school on a tight pivot, Usually larger and more like a half pass on a circle. Similar note a canter pirouette is done in 4 beats. I have seen people say online, it should be 3- no NEVER 3. if it is 3 it is very poorly executed and ridden. Why most people when schooling pirouettes school on a large circle and do not school on the spot very often. The goal is to keep the right mechanics. How things are schooled at home is not how they are ridden in the show ring.
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