New to riding racehorses-need help stopping! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 18 Old 01-18-2017, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
Not so easy to sit back when your stirrup irons are six + holes shorter than normal, in a race exercise saddle you might end up sitting in the horse's loins.
LOL never been in a racing saddle so I can't relate only from experience. What I meant was, if you lean forward a ton the horse is obviously going to go faster.
But Redz is an OTTB and sometimes he 'GOES' and I definitely have to make sure I don't lean forward even a little bit.

Ride more, worry less.
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post #12 of 18 Old 01-18-2017, 02:15 PM
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There is a BIG difference with racehorses that are fit and ready to race.

I assume that the OP is working at a steeplechase yard, these are older horses that know the routine inside out and generally have a lot of 'character' to them
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post #13 of 18 Old 01-18-2017, 02:36 PM
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Of course there is @Foxhunter . :) I was just putting in my two cents. No worries.
My OTTB definitely has a lot of 'racehorse' in him. It's hard to slow him down at times, that's why I have to 'blob it', using my seat more than my reins, and not let him get away.

Ride more, worry less.
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post #14 of 18 Old 01-25-2017, 07:25 PM
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Op are you learning to ride trackwork or such? If not, dont understand why youd want to ride with jockey length stirrups for starters?? And putting you on an x racehorse who hasnt been trained to yield to pressure, with a trainer who didnt bother to explain... tend to agree with the person who said they did that just to see how you dealt with it.

Interesting that so many racehorses seem to be taught to brace against pressure - when i rode trackwork i remember them having very 'soft' mouths.
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post #15 of 18 Old 01-26-2017, 12:11 AM
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Only rode one horse that had been on the track. She was a running App X TB cross, thus not a broad view, and her issues could have been because of who trained her.

Certainly not a soft mouth, and far as I know, not un expected, as race hroses run on the bit and on the forehand, as that is the best way to cover a lot of ground fast
In her case, I had to go back to basics, far as making a riding horse out of a race horse, and a big part of that, was getting a whoa. Even so, she never completely forgot her racing, and if ahrose came up on her,from behind, with speed, she was back in starting gate mode. Any attempt to hold her back, would result in her going up. (she came with a rearing and going over backwards issue, plus halter pulling ) Just my experience, with one ex race horse, sp take it with a grain of salt!
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post #16 of 18 Old 01-26-2017, 03:18 AM
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Op are you learning to ride trackwork or such? If not, dont understand why youd want to ride with jockey length stirrups for starters?? And putting you on an x racehorse who hasnt been trained to yield to pressure, with a trainer who didnt bother to explain... tend to agree with the person who said they did that just to see how you dealt with it.

Interesting that so many racehorses seem to be taught to brace against pressure - when i rode trackwork i remember them having very 'soft' mouths.
The OP is working for a racehorse trainer therefore, when you take horses on the gallops you ride with much shorter stirrups.

Secondly many horses, especially the jumpers (steeplechasers) have quirky characters. They know the routine backwards and generally stop where they are meant to stop.

As for brCing against pressure, they usually balance against the rider's hands, doesn't mean that they are pulling, or have a hard mouth, just it is the way they are kept at a certain speed. A racehorse doesn't just have to gallop flat out from A to B, especially the jumpers that are distance horses, but to relax into a 'canter' which in racing terms is a steady gallop.
This is going against their instincts when they really want to go.
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post #17 of 18 Old 01-26-2017, 08:07 AM
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The OP is working for a racehorse trainer therefore,.
That makes sense then.

Quote:
As for brCing against pressure, they usually balance against the rider's hands, doesn't mean that they are pulling, or have a hard mouth, just it is the way they are kept at a certain speed.
Yeah, understand that. We used to 'hold them in pace' too. Just that op said more she pulled, faster he went & others said that was common.
Quote:

A racehorse doesn't just have to gallop flat out from A to B
Yeah, I didn't get to gallop that often, as a lowly trackworker, most was cantering, conditioning work.
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post #18 of 18 Old 01-26-2017, 09:55 AM
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We had a racehorse come in to be kept in light work. He had been broken as a 2 yr old went into training but was growing so was sent back to us. He was gelded as he was so darn big. Anyone couldmrode him as he was basically energyless!

He went back into training as a 3 yr old and did well above expectation, he came back to us fprmthe winter and had totally changed. He was a big strong powerhouse and dropped many of the younger workers just fooling around so I was the one to work him each day. Mostly I rode him on his own and when I worked him I worked him like a dressage horse. I had to keep his mind active as he loved to show off especially if passing other horses.

He went back into training and later ran in the Japan Cup, coming second. The winner was an announced pacemaker which was supposed to not make the distance but he kept going!

Bedtime returned after that trip. He was exhausted with the travel took him a good couple of weeks to feel good. He was even stronger to rode, not in pulling against me but just in himself, he could have won showing. I actually took him to some minor dressage competitions, that was a laugh as they were in an indoor arena and he kept spooking at himself in the mirrors.

The trainer broke his neck and was in hospital somBedtime stayed with us through the spring. I had to ride him in his faster work on am all weather up hill gallop. Ha ha, here was a horse that was going as light as a fairy, on the bit and collected. On the gallops he was a tank. Took a real hold of the bit and just wanted to go.

It took all my strength to hold him, hands fixed down, reins short, bracing in my all to short stirrups. My arms ached within four furlongs, my legs were on fire, eyes and nose streaming and I was greatly short on wind!

Different horse entirely!
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