Are there horse breeds specific to certain kinds of riding? - The Horse Forum
 19Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 14 Old 12-23-2019, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Lawton, OK
Posts: 228
• Horses: 0
Question Are there horse breeds specific to certain kinds of riding?

Is a Pure Spanish horse, PRE, suitable for both western and English, for example?

How does a PRE, Andalusian, handle trail riding and carrying packs?

Is the American Quarter the most versatile breed for many kinds of different riding and purposes?
jonbailey is offline  
post #2 of 14 Old 12-23-2019, 07:07 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vermont
Posts: 6,504
• Horses: 3
You'll probably get as many opinions as there are breeds, but a strong contender for "most versatile breed" would be America's first breed, the Morgan horse.
egrogan is offline  
post #3 of 14 Old 12-23-2019, 07:17 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 8,578
• Horses: 0
I would agree with ^^^^^.

That said, while each breed of registered stock has something it excels in, all breeds can function very well in venues “outside their respective boxes”; just don’t expect them to reach the top in points if that is your goal:)
Woodhaven and Aprilswissmiss like this.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
walkinthewalk is offline  
post #4 of 14 Old 12-23-2019, 07:53 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 8,246
• Horses: 12
It is all in the build. IMO you can have a horse suitable for just about everything but then you won't excel at anything. They also have to enjoy what they do. I'd say Morgan or Quarter Horse but I am sure you could find individuals in just about any breed that would fit that description.

Some horse people change their horse, they change their tack and discipline, they change their instructor; they never change themselves.
QtrBel is online now  
post #5 of 14 Old 12-24-2019, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Lawton, OK
Posts: 228
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
It is all in the build. IMO you can have a horse suitable for just about everything but then you won't excel at anything. They also have to enjoy what they do. I'd say Morgan or Quarter Horse but I am sure you could find individuals in just about any breed that would fit that description.
To me, the ideal breeds for American outdoors-men especially in the West would be those embraced by the US Forest Service for rangers to ride. A man from Wyoming told me an Appaloosa was ideal for the mountains. Some people claim horses and burros are better than horses on bad hilly terrain.

I have always wondered what the best horse would be for the mounted big-game sport hunter in North America. One horse might be for saddle while the other horse or string of animals might be for packing gear and taking game. The notion of hunting deer and other game via horseback seems romantic to me. A horse is certainly more elegant than a burro, mule or llama.

Are there excellent mixed-breed horses out there for trail or outdoor sports?
jonbailey is offline  
post #6 of 14 Old 12-24-2019, 01:21 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 79
• Horses: 1
I don't think, so, no. Some horses are certainly bred for better conformation to be more versatile, but I don't think there's any one type of horse for one thing. "Versatility" is often oddly defined for each breed - for example, "versatile" for a QH means they can do ranch work, or showing. Versatile as a sport horse means an entirely different thing, just as versatile for an endurance horse. Personally, I look for breeds that can do a majority of things well - which have come down to breeds like sport-bred Arabs, some baroque breeds, TB's, and "mutts" mostly. Mustangs are very versatile, as are Arabs. My Arab X(I suspect Morab or Hispano Arab) is highly versatile and can out-trot every working-shape QH I've ever put her up against. She pulled off a 25-mile ride up a mountain last summer on a hot day while she was out of shape and finished perfectly sound, though sore.

QH I've never found to be particularly versatile and stay versatile to be honest, not when they have to hold up with a lot of work. Some are good at their jobs, certainly, but I've yet to meet one that really excels in many areas or stays sound and fit as easily as other breeds. Being the world's most popular breed(I think?), I'm sure there's some nice ones out there, but after working and living on a ranching community my whole life and listening to my landlord's woes about her horses constantly going lame... I think personally there's better options or at least better lines in QH that are much more versatile than others(Rugged Lark for one is gorgeous as are his descendants). Appaloosa's and Mustang X's are two that I've found to compete just as well if not better for a good ranch horse spot. Arabs have the endurance, but they're less calm and don't have the weight to throw around while roping cows/etc like bigger horses do. Some of the best ranch horses I've ever met were Mustangs, Quarabs, and Draft X's, or TB's. I also don't think the conformation of the QH lends itself to trails or that sort of work either, to be honest. They're often much too heavy on the forehand to hold up well on trotting trails all day.

For trail, I'm personally biased towards breeds like Arabs and Arab X's. They go, they get the job done, and they come back fresh. ;) If you're looking for a relaxed ride however, they may not be the best choice. :) I also know a woman who regularly packs out elk and deer on her little Morgan mare very easily. The short, stocky, and versatile build of the Morgan is excellent for mountain work in my opinion. (Though I will say, I prefer Lippitt style morgans to show-ring types any day.)
knightrider and LoriF like this.

"The art of riding is hard to find and easily lost."
The Equinest is offline  
post #7 of 14 Old 12-24-2019, 08:11 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vermont
Posts: 6,504
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonbailey View Post
To me, the ideal breeds for American outdoors-men especially in the West would be those embraced by the US Forest Service for rangers to ride.
Read the history of the Morgan then. There are literally lines called “Government Morgans” because the US govt chose them for their remount breeding program, using Morgan studs at breeding stations throughout the country to breed their cavalry horses
https://bossertranch.com/html/govtbred.html
egrogan is offline  
post #8 of 14 Old 12-24-2019, 09:12 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: CenTex
Posts: 1,905
• Horses: 0
@jonbailey in Scotland they use Highland "ponies" (I put pony in parenthesis because some of them are larger than pony size) for hunting. They are large enough to carry deer back and very sure-footed in the hills. These ponies are also good for trail riding and (I would imagine) for farming. That might be the best all-around breed in the UK.

They make special "game" saddles to carry back the deer.
LoriF likes this.
ACinATX is offline  
post #9 of 14 Old 12-24-2019, 09:15 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 10,847
• Horses: 0
I think any horse can be versatile, trained to do many tasks and do, accomplish them with ease.
Unless you are requiring of a horse to be discipline specific "top-notch" near any breed can fit and do versatile work.
Morgans can pull, ride, jump, pack-out and they use to race them decades ago in small town races against their neighbors horses...
The same is true for Quarter Horses...
Holds true for Arabians, Appaloosa's, Thoroughbreds, Mules, etc...and the endless list of designer mix-bred today so many think of as "pure" are actually mutts, albeit expensive ones but crosses of several breeds = a mutt in actuality. jmo

If you are referring to very difficult terrain to maneuver, steep & rocky in nature then Mule or Donk are far superior to a horse for what ever the reason...
I believe that is proved when pack companies in the mountains, rough back country prefer mule/donk for their pack animals and Grand Canyon uses mules to take humans to the canyon bottom safely and then back to the rim...not a easy trek for animal or human to make.
The animals can also pull all types of vehicles and weights appropriate for their size.
I've also see them jump beautifully in shows and of course their pasture fence when they want...
Versatile fits here too...

However, once you want the animal to excel at one specific task, then the versatile training needs to stop and specific needs to begin...
At "retirement" many animals find a new career they can do and do well, so here comes versatile again.
Regardless of breed or size..all animals can have multiple uses over a lifetime.
...
bsms likes this.

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is offline  
post #10 of 14 Old 12-24-2019, 10:03 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Hildreth, FL
Posts: 2,693
• Horses: 5
Morgans are extremely versatile. Appaloosas are too. I once won a silver belt buckle as a versatility award in a series of 9 horse shows. I had high points in English Pleasure, Hunter Over Fences, Western Pleasure, and Speed classes with my appaloosa.
Appaloosa Horses
LoriF likes this.
knightrider is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome