I need help choosing a bit! - The Horse Forum
 2Likes
  • 1 Post By horselovinguy
  • 1 Post By Hackamore
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 Old 05-20-2020, 01:37 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 23
• Horses: 0
I need help choosing a bit!

Hi everyone!

I'm fairly new to this, I've only posted a question once, it got so much attention, and so much good feedback! (If you replied, I took your advice and tried some other horses!)

But.. I finally found my dream horse! He's a 16.1 hand OTTB gelding, about 13 years old! I'm in LOVEEE!

We're currently going through the (long, exhausting) process of buying him!

When I rode him, he was a dream! One problem was, after we jumped over bigger jumps (2'3" and over) he seemed to throw his head a little bit to the side, and wanted his head. Of course, I gave him his head, I'd never ridden in that kind of bit. It was a TRIPLE elevator bit, I had no clue how to use it, so of course, I asked. The owner said, "just give him a little slack so often, he'll be fine, he always rides in this bit!" and smiled and showed me. I was like, "okay!" so I let him have his head a bit. He also had a figure-eight bridle. He still threw his head.

Since I'm going to get him, I'm thinking of putting him in a bit I'm more comfortable using. I was thinking of a d-ring snaffle (since I literally ALWAYS ride in that bit) and in a plain, Suffolk hunter bridle from Dover. His owner sent me videos of the horse in a D-Ring and a normal bridle, he didn't throw his head at all! Maybe he's learned some bad habits?

Please ket me know if this is a problem with his behavior or it's the bit and bridle?

Thank you so much!
Natasha :)
natasha06 is offline  
post #2 of 10 Old 05-20-2020, 01:52 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 9,563
• Horses: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by natasha06 View Post
We're currently going through the (long, exhausting) process of buying him! I'm not understanding why it would be long or exhausting?

When I rode him, he was a dream! One problem was, after we jumped over bigger jumps (2'3" and over) he seemed to throw his head a little bit to the side, and wanted his head. Of course, I gave him his head, I'd never ridden in that kind of bit. It was a TRIPLE elevator bit, I had no clue how to use it, so of course, I asked. The owner said, "just give him a little slack so often, he'll be fine, he always rides in this bit!" and smiled and showed me. I was like, "okay!" so I let him have his head a bit. He also had a figure-eight bridle. He still threw his head. What ring were the reins on? Top ring where the mouthpiece is attached? Middle? Bottom?

Since I'm going to get him, I'm thinking of putting him in a bit I'm more comfortable using. I was thinking of a d-ring snaffle (since I literally ALWAYS ride in that bit) and in a plain, Suffolk hunter bridle from Dover. His owner sent me videos of the horse in a D-Ring and a normal bridle, he didn't throw his head at all! Maybe he's learned some bad habits? Where was he being ridden and what was he doing? In an arena? On the trails? Doing dressage? Jumping a course?

Please ket me know if this is a problem with his behavior or it's the bit and bridle? I'd say it could be either or both. Your skill as a rider determines whether it continues not the equipment you use. If you have to resort to that type of fix then at this point he may not be the horse for you especially if this is his norm. The potential is there that going to a non leverage bit you may have little to no control jumping.
A horse responds to the rider as well as the equipment. You have to look at the level of the person and the softness of their hands when ridden as well as the temperament of the horse. A figure 8 set correctly will keep them from opening their mouth but will not otherwise disrupt airflow or pinch at nerves but a figure 8 is a noseband used so you don't need to resort to a stronger bit. The combination of bridle that offers a greater degree of control and a bit that does the same would make me question. The elevator is a leverage bit. It can be a very strong control. It can be ridden like a snaffle with the reins attached to the ring the mouthpiece is attached or with leverage if a lower ring is used. The further from the initial ring the more leverage produced. What ring was the horse"s reins placed on?


Without knowing you or how you ride or what type of horses you have been riding my fear for a young rider in this situation would be the potential of you being over horsed.


You need to ride the horse in the bit you intend to ride him in and see how he goes. You need to also ride him on the flat as well as over a course. There is much potential for misuse with the bit he is in.

Some horse people change their horse, they change their tack and discipline, they change their instructor; they never change themselves.

Last edited by QtrBel; 05-20-2020 at 02:11 PM.
QtrBel is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 05-20-2020, 02:11 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 11,756
• Horses: 0
Sounds more to me a training issue...his and the rider he had.
People use strong bits to cover-up holes in training by muscling the horse through/past it not by taking the time to fill in the lacking education and training that is weak.
The horse after a fence landing then throwing the head also makes me instantly think he can be forward & free moving with a big stride and scope over a fence...when he landed he got popped in the mouth, in turn he learned to throw his head and ask/grab the reins to save his mouth from pain.
Rider error, horse self-preservation...
Expect to find holes when you take him home and really work with him in his training, and his training need to tweak to your strength and weaknesses as we all have those issues ourselves...no one is "perfect" in riding, no one.

As for the bit...3-ring elevator to a simple d-ring is a huge back-off.
Be prepared you might need to find "more" bit so you can ride and work together as you fill in those holes I mentioned...
Till you do some serious schooling now he is yours to truly find out what it is you sit upo,n discovering what bit the horse responds to lightest in contact needed doing your bidding with eagerness...trial and error a bit.
Borrow bits if you need to find a different one as they get expensive fast...

Don't discount riding in a Pelham bridle which can be many mouth configurations with as simple as direct reined snaffle or used with the curb rein engaged which gives you some leverage for lightening and more refined communication and honestly, some oomph since he rides in a 3-ring elevator that is oomph of poll and jaw leverage depending upon how those rings were engaged in combination.
If you use a Pelham, ride with 2 reins not the converter strap...if you don't know how, learn how to hold and use those reins independently and in combo..delicate the communication can be, a twitch of a finger..

You mentioned a "hunter bridle" and Pelhams are a hunter bit and legal in the show ring, looks a lot more refined than a clunky converter strap too.
Thefigure-8 noseband...horse may have a habit of crossing his jaw, opening his mouth ...all lead me back to his "self-preservation" and protecting himself from someone with harsh hands and balancing on/in his mouth

Congratulations on your new horse and enjoy the time learning to be a team working together.
...
boots likes this.

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is offline  
post #4 of 10 Old 05-20-2020, 02:28 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 25,963
• Horses: 7
OTTBs don't actually need stronger bits. A lot of people go immediately to the harsher bit so they can skip going back to the basics and go straight into showing but honestly - going back and starting them over the right way will make a happier healthier horse in my opinion.

I would think you could go to a snaffle. I'm a fan of the mylar bits (because after going through tons of bits I've found they work well for me personally). I have a level one for snaffle for Cloud and have purchases a level one western bit for when he's ready for it. I like how you can do levels with them as well. But I don't think you have to go that expensive on a bit.

The biggest thing is - from what you described is that you understand that you will probably have some retraining work that had gotten skipped over with him. Going back may make things nicer for you.

"Be a best friend, tell the truth, and overuse I love you
Go to work, do your best, don't outsmart your common sense
Never let your prayin knees get lazy
And love like crazy"
farmpony84 is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 05-20-2020, 07:08 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 23
• Horses: 0
Totally agree!! And thank you!!!
natasha06 is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 05-20-2020, 07:09 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 23
• Horses: 0
Yes!! I really want a d-ring, or some kind of snaffle! Thank you!! :)
natasha06 is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 05-20-2020, 07:50 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 11,756
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by natasha06 View Post
Yes!! I really want a d-ring, or some kind of snaffle! Thank you!! :)
Don't forget you need to get to the point where the horse has been educated enough you can ride him in just a snaffle bit with a d-ring style look to it.
Understand what it is you are going to be removing and have the ability to stay safe while you make the transition to a different bit...
Let the horse be your guide in what he likes and wants to carry in his mouth as he does your bidding on every ride.
It should be the horse who determines what bit he carries while ridden.

Yes, a d-ring would look nice on a hunter horse as would a full-cheek bit with bit loops attached or eggbutt in the hunter ring.
A snaffle is just a direct reined bit, it is what the mouthpiece is that tells the story though..
A smooth, single joint broken mouthpiece, multiple joints, twists, a solid mullen mouth...today a lot more choices and some not so nice in all style and ring of bit is available.
A pelham is what true hunters in appointment classes carried/wore in their bridles at the shows years ago...

Don't limit yourself because of a look you desire, open your choices to find what your horse will work best with for you.
Then dial it in, and search for the ring style after you find the mouthpiece the horse wants to carry.
...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 05-21-2020, 10:32 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 548
• Horses: 2
This could be a soundness problem, teeth, the bit or training issue but no one here can accurately tell without seeing the horse.

If it were me I would have him vet checked before any money was exchanged. If he checked out OK with the vet I then would ride him again in just a snaffle with the purpose of evaluating his level of training. Just check out the basics “does he come off bit pressure, yield to leg pressure, back up without fight the bit, WT&C on a loose rein & when collected, etc”
If the horses foundation training is solid he should do fine with the basics in a snaffle. If you still see issues during any of these activities that you don’t think can be fixed on your own, then I would pass on this horse.

Best of luck
ACinATX likes this.
Hackamore is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 05-21-2020, 01:36 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 9,563
• Horses: 12
Most of the elevators I have seen in use around here have a single joint. Find out what he is in for the mouthpiece.

Some horse people change their horse, they change their tack and discipline, they change their instructor; they never change themselves.
QtrBel is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 05-22-2020, 07:40 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 23
• Horses: 0
Hi! His reins were connected to the first ring. I don't really think I'm being over horsed, especially since I can easily control him (meaning he's not uncontrollable and difficult for me to manage). I've done quite a lot of flatting with him, and I've been on him a few times now. We've hopped around some courses. The owner is giving me a bridle with the elevator bit, and I'm thinking of just using what she's giving me, especially because he's already used to that bit. I'm not sure if it's allowed in the hunter ring, so I'm hoping to get him used to a d-ring. The bridle that she is giving me is just a normal hunter bridle, and I've recently ridden him in it, he loves that bridle!! He didn't throw his head at all, I'm thinking it might've been the bit and the figure-8 combined that he just didn't like! Thank you!
natasha06 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome