Just a thought: Ported snaffles.. Opinions? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 12:26 PM
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What I mean is that the way you ride with a curb is completely different than a snaffle. With a snaffle you have contact on the reins, with a curb you don't. With a snaffle you use two hands and with a curb it's just one. With a snaffle you're using direct rein contact on the mouth, with a curb you're using indirect contact on the neck.
It could even be that your riding changes because you're anticipating problems?
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post #12 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 12:31 PM Thread Starter
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Hm. I think you might be right there, JDI.

Is there anything specific you think I should change, or just be more relaxed and not "anticipate problems" when riding with the snaffle?

One man's wrong lead is another man's counter canter.
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post #13 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShannonSevenfold View Post
Hey all. I'm hoping someone out there can help me out with this. Here's my thoughts: For a horse who doesn't respond well at all to a loose-ring snaffle, but goes perfectly in a standard western curb, do you think a ported snaffle would be a nice English bit option?

Someone just rip me to pieces if that's an idiotic question. lol I don't know my bits too well.
I would go with a double joint or low port Kimberwhick (kimberwicke?) bit. The uxter kind with the slots on the side. Put your reins in the lower slot and have the curb chain adjusted a bit loose (2 fingers of room). Work with his reponse to the bit, moving up to the top slot as he gets better. Then loosen the chain more as he gets good with that.

After a while, if you really work on softening him and lightening him to your aids, you should be able to get him down to a regular snaffle. I prefer a 3-piece (french link or bean/oval mouth) as it activates more nerves, sending a clearer signal. Most horses respond well to them.
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post #14 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 01:25 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luvs2ride1979 View Post
I would go with a double joint or low port Kimberwhick (kimberwicke?) bit. The uxter kind with the slots on the side. Put your reins in the lower slot and have the curb chain adjusted a bit loose (2 fingers of room). Work with his reponse to the bit, moving up to the top slot as he gets better. Then loosen the chain more as he gets good with that.

After a while, if you really work on softening him and lightening him to your aids, you should be able to get him down to a regular snaffle. I prefer a 3-piece (french link or bean/oval mouth) as it activates more nerves, sending a clearer signal. Most horses respond well to them.
Korsteel Jointed Uxeter Kimberwicke Bit - Statelinetack.com

Is this what you were thinking of?

One man's wrong lead is another man's counter canter.
"Adjust Your Pleasure"
2006 Medicine Hat Paint Gelding
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post #15 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 01:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShannonSevenfold View Post
Yup, except I don't like the single joints. I have found most horses do better in either the low port or the three piece mouth.
Browsing Store - Korsteel Double Hinged Uxeter Kimberwick Bit with Copper Roller
Browsing Store - Korsteel Uxeter Kimberwicke Bit

Or a single joint with a curved mouth, like the JP bits.
Browsing Store - JP Jointed Uxeter Kimberwicke Bit

Myler's are great, but a bit pricey.
Myler Low Port Wide Kimberwick Level 3 Bit, Myler Bits from Adams Horse Supply
Myler Comfort Kimberwick with Wide Barrel Level 1 Bit, Myler Bits from Adams Horse Supply
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post #16 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 03:09 PM
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Think of it this way... the bit & reins are the phone lines of communication to your horse.

English Vs. Western is Texting Vs. Calling. If I call my Grandma, she'll pick up the phone and talk to me....if I text my Grandma, she'll look and the phone and wonder why its beeping at her and no one answers when she says hello.

Your horse is spazing because he doesn't know the cues yet. JDI explained the differences rather well in her last post.

That's the why part of your problem.

I personally like Myler bits though they're expensive, they are a one time (lifetime if treated well) investment. If you ride at a barn, I'd ask to borrow a couple different types of bits and see what works.

Seems to me the horse understands bit & headstall leverage but not constant rein pressure so he's all boggled & confused.

Be strong and courageous, and do the work. Don't be afraid or discouraged by the size of the task, for the Lord God, my God, is with you. He will not fail you or forsake you.

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post #17 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 03:14 PM
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If your horse has such a preference for shanked bits, you might try a Kimberwick as Luvs2ride and others suggested or even a Pelham bit. Both come in mouthpieces of your choice.

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

Nothing sucks more than that moment during an argument when you realize you're wrong.


It's not always what you say but what they hear.

Last edited by iridehorses; 08-19-2009 at 03:16 PM.
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post #18 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 03:15 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, JDI and Duma's_Grrrl - What you both said makes A LOT of sense.

iridehorses - That's what I was thinking after what luvs2ride said. I never even thought of a kimberwicke.

One man's wrong lead is another man's counter canter.
"Adjust Your Pleasure"
2006 Medicine Hat Paint Gelding
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post #19 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 06:36 PM
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My only concern with using a kimberwicke or pelham with direct reinig is that if your horse is already having problems direct reining in a snaffle, the extra "oomph" of a curb action bit along with the direct reining might make it even worse.

My first suggestion would be to float his teeth.

My second suggestion would be to think that you basically need to retrain him to think like an english horse instead of a western horse. This means going back to square one and getting him flexing and giving to a snaffle at a walk, and reschooling him. It is a completely different sensation, and Dumas gave an amazing explanation as to why they can get so confused!

By the way, Amy, it's good to see you back on the boards!
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post #20 of 23 Old 08-19-2009, 08:27 PM
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You can use a pelham bit with preferably a mullen or a ported mouthpiece!!! make sure to learn how to use two reins though! Roundings are not a good idea!
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