2018 Horse Talk for Mature People over 40 - Page 214 - The Horse Forum
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post #2131 of 2197 Old 05-10-2019, 12:04 PM
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@greentree the horse doing the 8.5 mph walk is this a TWH? at a flat walk?

For those not familiar with the speed of a TWH here is a little bit of knowledge.

The flat foot walk is a brisk, long-reaching
walk that can cover from 4 to 8 miles an hour.
This is a four cornered gait with each of the horse's feet
hitting the ground separately at regular intervals. The horse
will glide over the track left by the front foot with his hind foot
(right rear over right front, left rear over left front).
The action of the back foot slipping over the
front track is known as overstride.

The running walk is the gait for
which the walking horse is most noted!
This extra-smooth gliding gait is basically the same
as the flat walk with a marked increase in speed.
This breed can travel 10 to 20 miles per hour at this gait.
As the speed is increased, the horse over-steps the front track
with the back foot by from 6 to 18 inches.

Tennessee Walking Horse, Breed Description and Gaits - Presented by Jus' Fine


My first horse for my kids was a 15.3 TWH X Percheron and the lady running the stable said the horse was lame due to his head bobbing up and down. Then she read up on the breed and learned that they bob their heads up and down and some also will click their teeth together while keeping in time with their strides

I am concerned for the security of our great Nation; not so much because of any threat from without, but because of the insidious forces working from within. Douglas MacArthur
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post #2132 of 2197 Old 05-10-2019, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RegalCharm View Post
@greentree the horse doing the 8.5 mph walk is this a TWH? at a flat walk?

For those not familiar with the speed of a TWH here is a little bit of knowledge.

The flat foot walk is a brisk, long-reaching
walk that can cover from 4 to 8 miles an hour.
This is a four cornered gait with each of the horse's feet
hitting the ground separately at regular intervals. The horse
will glide over the track left by the front foot with his hind foot
(right rear over right front, left rear over left front).
The action of the back foot slipping over the
front track is known as overstride.

The running walk is the gait for
which the walking horse is most noted!
This extra-smooth gliding gait is basically the same
as the flat walk with a marked increase in speed.
This breed can travel 10 to 20 miles per hour at this gait.
As the speed is increased, the horse over-steps the front track
with the back foot by from 6 to 18 inches.

Tennessee Walking Horse, Breed Description and Gaits - Presented by Jus' Fine


My first horse for my kids was a 15.3 TWH X Percheron and the lady running the stable said the horse was lame due to his head bobbing up and down. Then she read up on the breed and learned that they bob their heads up and down and some also will click their teeth together while keeping in time with their strides
I have no idea what gait she does, lol! As long as it is 4 beat, and doesn’t get rough, I’m happy!
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post #2133 of 2197 Old 05-12-2019, 11:07 AM
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First of all, I need to introduce myself to @Eole . I am originally from Massachusetts, but I have been living in Spain for nearly 30 years now (DH is Spanish). I love Québec, and we have a summer cottage in northern Maine, about 4h away from Canada. After an accident 5 years ago, I no longer own a horse, but I live vicariously through everyone else in this group. About 18 months ago, I changed from hunt seat to Dressage, and I am working with a trainer here in Toledo. As @SueC has mentioned, I get to ride some lovely little PRE & Lusitano ponies.

Quote:
I think my next vacation it would be great fun to spend a week at your place, riding and driving horses! Maybe we could teach Chivas to drive Much better than a dude ranch! What would you charge??
Sign me up! I was thinking the exact same thing. For my fast-approaching 50th birthday, I want to learn something new (keep that grey matter active). Maybe @greentree needs an assistant to help out with her herd, in exchange for some driving lessons?

@RegalCharm , your talk of babies and teething brings back memories. I think my eldest son broke a record when he was 8 months old: 8 new teeth in 10 days. Believe me, if there had been whisky in the house, we would both have been into it!
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post #2134 of 2197 Old 05-12-2019, 11:32 AM
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My turn:

New student rider started last week with trainer. Ack, makes me nervous. The seat, the leg position (chair seat, with heels up), the elbows way out in front, the lack of contact… do that on the wrong horse and you are in for some big trouble. Sometimes I question the ethics of having a less experienced rider ride large, powerful horses. Am I showing my age? Of course, if I were 19 or 20 and had been given the opportuity to ride some of these horses, you can bet I would not have thought about my own safety for a split second. Anyway, trainer had him on Solomon, who I have not mentioned before. He's been at the barn since the fall, brought in for more advanced training, and he is a big'un. Not one of my favorite horses because he acts up in the stall, but his movement has really been improving with consistent work (NOT with me!).

Remember how I said that last week was my worst ride with Presu? Oh no, I was wrong. This week was even worse. After 30 minutes, I had to get off and leave. I was exhausted, he was so hard in the hand that my fingers were blistering, and no progress was being made. I don't know who is doing what with him, or perhaps he has decided to test me, but sheesh, I am frustrated. Trainer says he's being a real PITA with him, too, but not with the kids (who let him have his way).

Anyway, trainer's daughter rode him in a comp this wknd, and this photo was posted on FB. Well, at least his head position was improved in cool down, and I'd like to think that my work with him might have had something to do with it. I'm sure you'll notice a difference from the last photo I posted 6 weeks ago.
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post #2135 of 2197 Old 05-12-2019, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
they're all such excellent examples
This is so nice to hear (even though not my horses), and I agree. It is, however, hard to have a conversation with non-horsie folks or those who have not worked with properly trained, well-exercised horses about this. In my case, there are so many stigmata attached to certain buzz words, like "Dressage", "contact", "spurs", "double-bridle", etc., that certain people think that these horses can't possibly be well cared for or even happy. Of course, these elements can be abused in the wrong hands, but just come look at these horses, the fluidity of their movement, the lack of artificial training apparati for flexion, their willingness to go, their overall, balanced muscle development, the collection, the impulsion from behind, etc. Then, ride one of these horses and tell me that you can't feel a difference.

When I went on that trail ride with my American friend in October, the owner of the facility (after finding out where I ride) asked me how his PRE horses compared to the horses I usually ride. Where to even start?
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post #2136 of 2197 Old 05-12-2019, 12:54 PM
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LOL I have a stock pile stored up LOL I refer to the bottles as trading material in case of a S hits the fan type scenario happens.


Your stable does have some beautiful horses. The kids learning to ride letting the horses do what the horses want to do is my guess as to why he wants to be a pita when it is actually work time. He is thinking this is the way the kids let me so why change because a bigger kid wants to ride.

I am concerned for the security of our great Nation; not so much because of any threat from without, but because of the insidious forces working from within. Douglas MacArthur
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post #2137 of 2197 Old 05-12-2019, 09:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spanish Rider View Post
When I went on that trail ride with my American friend in October, the owner of the facility (after finding out where I ride) asked me how his PRE horses compared to the horses I usually ride. Where to even start?
By just saying that the horses at both places have very different jobs and are well suited to their respective jobs

While I can imagine that riding a very well trained horse is lots of fun - I already know that I am not a good enough rider to really ride such a horse. I would probably be closer to the kids showing Presu or literally being taken for a ride
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post #2138 of 2197 Old 05-13-2019, 05:13 AM
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@Swiss , I am no expert myself! Total Dressage newbie here! But, when I say "well-trained", I don't mean trained in fancy-pants movements, I mean horses that engage their hinds (impulsion/collection), engage their back (roundness - not going hollow) and perform lateral movements like leg yield (flexibility, bend), regardless of discipline. Basically, I simply mean well-developed, strong yet flexible horses who have been properly trained under saddle, which I think is what @SueC was initially referring to. Like your Raya!

The other end of the spectrum would be those stiff-as-boards, auto-pilot, underdeveloped, hollow-backed trail ride horses whose hinds are merely an afterthought. Of course, I did not say this to the owner. I will have to try to remember your kind answer! Unfortunately, though, even though I bite my tongue, my face is often an open book.
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post #2139 of 2197 Old 05-13-2019, 08:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spanish Rider View Post
The other end of the spectrum would be those stiff-as-boards, auto-pilot, underdeveloped, hollow-backed trail ride horses whose hinds are merely an afterthought. Of course, I did not say this to the owner. I will have to try to remember your kind answer! Unfortunately, though, even though I bite my tongue, my face is often an open book.


Unfortunately Raya is still closer to the second category When I got her, applying some leg simply meant "go" and turning was done by pulling on the reins... We have come quite a ways, but still have much more to go... As I said before, she would probably be further along with a more skilled rider, but I am not letting her go

Edited to add: I really love your new avatar! Presu looks simply stunning!
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post #2140 of 2197 Old 05-13-2019, 09:10 AM
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@Spanish Rider , I'd not make a good poker player either!

SueC is time travelling.
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