Barbed Wire Fencing - Page 6 - The Horse Forum
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post #51 of 60 Old 04-14-2019, 09:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Cattle are "dumb"....
I'm not too sure about this, and true; I don't know too many Bovines.
But the one I know best, the neighbors old Hereford cow named Rosy, isn't stupid. She is kinda slow, but if you look in her eyes, the gears are turning. Slowly, but turning for sure. She seems to be seeking the lowest energy solution to whatever problem confronts her; usually me trying to herd her back into her pasture.
"Yea, if you insist, Human. I'm going; just don't rush me . . ." :-D

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post #52 of 60 Old 04-14-2019, 09:42 AM
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OK...I agree.
Cattle are not dumb but some are not so quick in the mental area as others.
The stories told are that they are not free-thinkers but more follow the leader...
If moving in a herd and the first one tips off the cliff edge, there goes the herd unless the mounted cowboys can turn the herd off the cliff edge...
Our horses will try to stop..they may slip over but they don't willingly gallop along and not watch where they go...why one horse will spook, spin-off and others not...
Free-thinkers...
...

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post #53 of 60 Old 04-14-2019, 10:22 AM
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@horselovinguy "Cattle are dumb".
Quote:
Originally Posted by george the mule View Post
I'm not too sure about this, and true; I don't know too many Bovines.
But the one I know best, the neighbors old Hereford cow named Rosy, isn't stupid. She is kinda slow, but if you look in her eyes, the gears are turning. Slowly, but turning for sure. She seems to be seeking the lowest energy solution to whatever problem confronts her; usually me trying to herd her back into her pasture.
"Yea, if you insist, Human. I'm going; just don't rush me . . ." :-D
Some years ago, I got to hang around with a rather astute ox drover. He let me drive a single ox as he gave me a running commentary on working oxen. One thing he said was, that cattle are not dumb, but there is a "wide synaptic gap in there".
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post #54 of 60 Old 04-14-2019, 01:10 PM
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A friend runs a few cattle on open range in the west. He tries to remove all of them when his allotment time runs out, but a few are able to hide out. They can stay feral for years. Until caught. Tough to find them and harder to move them.

He had a stallion who disliked being ridden. Disliked humans. But then he discovered working wild cattle! The stallion would wade in to them, biting and twisting and kicking with both rear hooves. My friend said all he could do was hang on. He was certain if he came off, they both would cheerfully trample him to death. In the end, the stallion always won. The stallion loved it! He decided it was OK being ridden in exchange for sometimes getting to go work cattle like that.

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #55 of 60 Old 04-15-2019, 09:53 AM
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At my place the fences do double duty. Keep the horses in, keep everything else out. A heard of elk will run right through everything except barbed wire. They'll even run through that if it isn't maintained. Moose are stupid! If they touch an electric fence they charge into it. I can't tell you how many times I had to go down the road and retrieve the fence.
It's been my experience (and my vets') that T posts injure more horses than the fence. Now all my T posts have caps.
Most fence injuries happen in the corners and it doesn't matter what kind of fence it is. A lot of injuries happen from the horse running down the fence line and slamming into the corner. If we can avoid corners by rounding them off, or angling them we can avoid a lot of injuries.
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post #56 of 60 Old 04-15-2019, 10:30 AM
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Reading through but not finished, something that jumps out to me is that no matter the size lot you have fenced if you have a horse intent on running another through a fence then it doesn't matter the material there will be injuries unless the animal jumps it cleanly. Any fence can cause injury or death under the right(non ideal) circumstances. It is the owner/manager's job to determine and prioritize an ideal situation. That includes size of turn out, number of animals, which animals can be safely placed together and type of fence. There are situations you can not have complete control over and you do the best you can with what you have. Death had resulted with any type of fence just depends on what happened to cause the two to meet.
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post #57 of 60 Old 04-15-2019, 10:39 AM
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All my fence post are T post no caps, never had a horse injured. I've had some pretty stupid horse's here over the years and never an injury from post or fencing.

Even the barn sour idiot never got hurt from current fencing. He learned real quick the fence bites..got shocked a good couple of times, it literally set him back on his butt.
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post #58 of 60 Old 04-15-2019, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkdog View Post
At my place the fences do double duty. Keep the horses in, keep everything else out. A heard of elk will run right through everything except barbed wire. They'll even run through that if it isn't maintained. Moose are stupid! If they touch an electric fence they charge into it. I can't tell you how many times I had to go down the road and retrieve the fence.
It's been my experience (and my vets') that T posts injure more horses than the fence. Now all my T posts have caps.
Most fence injuries happen in the corners and it doesn't matter what kind of fence it is. A lot of injuries happen from the horse running down the fence line and slamming into the corner. If we can avoid corners by rounding them off, or angling them we can avoid a lot of injuries.
Yea, I have had Elk take out our fencing; usually just the top wire, but a couple of months ago, I watched a confused young cow-elk take out about 50ft of the neighbors fence after failing to clear it with a pitiful attempt at a jump. (She then trotted away with no visible damage; yet another argument for smooth wire.) The neighbor horses were quick to take advantage of the gap, and within minutes, all four of them came trotting up the road to visit with/tease mine. They know me, and it didn't take too long to get a catch-string on the Alpha horse "Carlos", and lead him (with his herd straggling along behind, and mine bellowing encouragement across the fence) back home.
Rosy, the above mentioned Bovine, just leans on the fence until something gives. George will sometimes stand on the middle wire until it breaks, and then duck under. I double up on the "stays" in places where he might be tempted to break out. Fortunately, we live in a relatively closed neighborhood, so the animals are fairly safe no matter where they wander. If you are on property adjacent to a busy road, I cannot recommend a single run of wire-on-t-post fencing, 'cause they _will_ go thru it eventually; count on it.

And T-posts. They tend to be kinda sharp anyway, and after driving them in, they often develop razor sharp edges. They will cut your gloves, they will cut you, and they will assuredly lacerate your Equines.

There are a variety of T-post caps available; some are for use with a hot-wire, but unless this is a useful feature, just get the fitted plastic ones:
https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail....oaAry_EALw_wcB

When I put in new wire, particularly if it is in a new place, I always adorn the top wire with a strip of surveyors tape to increase its visibility. This can be removed after a month or two, once the critters have had a chance to learn about the new fence.

Steve Jernigan KG0MB
Microelectronics Research
University of Colorado
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post #59 of 60 Old 04-18-2019, 05:16 PM
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Living out in the West on ranches, you've got barbed wire. It's not practical/possible to avoid it out here, unless you're going to keep your horses locked up in small paddocks, which we don't. We did have one mare cut up a hind leg badly in it one year. however, we also had a gelding cut a leg up badly in smooth wire. Some horses will find a way to try to kill themselves on any kind of fencing.
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post #60 of 60 Old 04-18-2019, 05:25 PM
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About Cows: What they don't step on, they poop on is true. They have their own kind of smarts, but yes... large synaptic gap there. Some are smarter than others though and I think the truly clever ones are the ones we all think are crazy and sell ASAP.


Hubs: We don't breed cows to be smart, we breed them to eat. We want our horses and dogs smart, not our cows. :P

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."
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