Cribbing/wind sucking why? And the use of shock collars.... - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 02:55 PM Thread Starter
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Cribbing/wind sucking why? And the use of shock collars....

Here's a question......

Why do you think horses crib or windsuck.......?

What's in your opinion the best way to stop or curb this behavior and why?

Has anyone used a zap collar to stop a horse from doing this?

Do you think it's 100% curable.......?
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post #2 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 03:01 PM
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I look at it as an addiction. I have seen people use the cribbing collars, but I dont think they do much to help. Seems as though if the horse wants to crib, it will. UGH, I hate that sound.

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post #3 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 03:03 PM
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Our filly actually cribbed due to ulcers. I guess it made her feel better. Once we diagnosed and treated the ulcers, she quit cribbing completely.
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post #4 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 03:08 PM
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When I first got Trusty he was wearing a cribbing collar. He was in a smaller paddock with a welsh, a mini and a huge boar hog. Not much exercise, low diet and seemed rather bored. He cribbed at every turn while finding the ranks of the herd, but has really lessened his cribbing over the last few weeks. I've only seen him do it twice in the last 5 weeks and both times were after being in the stall for over 30 minutes after he finished his supper. That was 3 weeks ago. He still wears the collar while out in the pasture until I have another couple of weeks with no signs of him cribbing.

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post #5 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 04:44 PM
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Horses usually crib because they are in an environment that encourages them to do so. They're most likely hungry, and have an oral affixation, such as a gate or fence. I don't believe that it's a learned or "contagious" behavior, rather, if there is an entire barn of horses who crib, it's because the environment has shaped that behavior.

As for your question, I would NEVER use electrical shock on a horse, as they would not understand what was happening or why. While dogs tend to catch on and figure it out, you have to contrast them to horses in that they are predator animals, and horses are prey animals. All they're going to want to do is run away from the pain.

Cribbing collars are one way to manage it, but their effectiveness varies based on each individual horse.

Make sure that there's no health problems occurring with your horse, and then examine his or her diet. Horses are grazing animals, and their gastro-intestinal system is designed to consume small amounts of low quality forage over the course of a day. The classic "two feedings per day" just doesn't cut it, and because a horse's stomach never stops producing acid, they need to have something to nibble on all day. Try to get a slow feeder, and make sure that your horse isn't getting hungry. Minimize grain. If it's too much of a habit to eliminate through correct, careful horsekeeping, then resort to a cribbing collar. But I've found that giving them something else to chew on (i.e., grass) works.
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post #6 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 04:55 PM
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My first horse, Jake, was a cribber. I only leased him and I only had him for about a good year and a half (maybe less).

Like what wetrain17 said, its like an addiction. I'm not sure what caused him to do it in the first place, but Jake would CONSTANTLY crib. I'd say the source of cribbing can be linked to boredom, stress, changes in environment, etc.

We used a cribbing collar like this: Weaver Leather Miracle Collar - Statelinetack.com

It didn't do anything, in fact I didn't even see a difference in his cribbing behavior.

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post #7 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 05:05 PM
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High grain rations, little hay, no turnout, no social contact, stressful environment and work = cribbing
It's almost normal for TB's in training, I've seen lots of jumpers also, in fact, I've seen every possible vice in jumper barns.

Curable? Sometimes. With always hay, little to no grain, given in several small meals, living in a herd.
I had only one cribber in all these years, an OTTB, which quit after a month completely, with above measures.
Shock collar? NEVER!
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post #8 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 05:10 PM Thread Starter
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Pretty much what I thought....read something the other day and the woman was spouting off about using a zap collar and that its 100% curable etc.....I know a lot about cribbing, but don know it all so was wondering if id missed the crazy train after I read that blurb!
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post #9 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muppetgirl View Post
Pretty much what I thought....read something the other day and the woman was spouting off about using a zap collar and that its 100% curable etc.....I know a lot about cribbing, but don know it all so was wondering if id missed the crazy train after I read that blurb!
Probably getting paid by the shock collar maker...
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post #10 of 18 Old 05-15-2013, 05:40 PM
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Well it's obvious what cribbing is, your horse is bored and requires 24 hour a day mental stimulation.

I suggest a brief jog before breakfast, then a light meal, followed by massage and some shopping. Serve a high protein lunch, and take in a movie, in the afternoon.

A healthy supper then off to the gym, bring him home, nice relaxing bath, and put him to beddy byes.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

I only owned one cribber, undisclosed so I actually returned her for a refund, the fact that she was bat **** crazy, was NOT an allowable reason to return, but undisclosed vice, gave me an out.

She was turned out 24/7 in company, she even had some cows for company, and when she was to bored to crib, she would cut the cows, and herd them. With her I believe that it was a vice brought on by her very nature, she was high energy, a worrier, probably would of done better with a full time working job.

I have know very placid laid back cribbers, who just seem to take comfort from the habit, so a bit like human addictions, the roots are many and varied. Given that the ways to control it are many and varied, and hear that all you can do is keep trying until something works.

Some cribbing is learned behaviour, that is proven I think, but some isn't.
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