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post #11 of 19 Old 03-30-2010, 03:35 PM
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One of my first threads on this forum was about my new farrier's fees - he charged me $30. to come tack a shoe back on, and failed to mention the fee before I set up the appointment. I really questioned at the time whether that was standard practice or legitimate.

Here's what I found out - there's a huge regional variation in farrier practices and policies; no way to judge if the $30. lost shoe fee was typical or not.

Here's what else I found out: My guy is an excellent farrier. He's improved my horses' way of going and overall soundness, and he's an honest, decent guy. Always on time, no matter the weather, reliable and a good horseman.

Farriers' cost of doing business has gone up dramatically over the last several years; not just the cost of diesel but the cost of shoes, nails and tools have risen steeply along with the price of steel. If he charges a farm call fee (my neighbor and and I split it) or any other fee, including that **** lost shoe fee, in order to recover his cost and make it worth while for him to keep shoeing, I'll pay it. I don't think he's getting wealthy off of me; as a matter of fact, considering the physical toll on their bodies, most farriers are underpaid.

If you like your farrier, he does a good job with your horses and is reliable, I would smile, shrug and pay it. Chances are he's just tinkering with his pricing trying to distribute cost fairly and break even.

Oh, and *this morning* I paid mine $215 - $10 farm call, $25 trim, $75 fronts only, $105 plain steel all around.

HTH
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post #12 of 19 Old 03-30-2010, 03:38 PM
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It seems like even if your farrier is charging a barn fee and charging to pull shoes he is still quite competitive pricewise and if you like the job he is doing then leave it alone and happily pay him.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
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post #13 of 19 Old 03-30-2010, 03:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses View Post
It seems like even if your farrier is charging a barn fee and charging to pull shoes he is still quite competitive pricewise and if you like the job he is doing then leave it alone and happily pay him.
Well put, Kevin. Honestly, if he did not actually break down the charges in an itemized fashion, would you balk at the total price or feel it was a fair rate? The fact of the matter is that all farriers are charging for the removal, he is just putting it out there where as others are including the "fee" in their total charge for the visit.

To answer your question, we pay $80 total per visit which is $30 per horse for a trim and $20 for the farm call.
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post #14 of 19 Old 03-31-2010, 04:25 PM
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my farrier is 40 for shoeing 15 just for trimming no call out fee and no charge for removing old shoes,how would he put new shoes on without calling out and taking the old ones off?
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post #15 of 19 Old 03-31-2010, 08:12 PM
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I've used the same farrier for over 20 years, love him to death, he's great at what he does. He gave me Dixie (which maybe was a curse because she has heaves, LOL).

Anyway, he charges $35.00 for a trim. That's all I have done. No shoes on my girls. He does not charge for barn calls or pulling shoes off or anything extra.
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post #16 of 19 Old 03-31-2010, 09:56 PM
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You need to find a new farrier, I pay $25 for a trim and no barn fee, I don't know about shoes because I don't shoe my horses. I would definitly be looking around for a new 1 and before I hired one I would make sure of their fee's.
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post #17 of 19 Old 03-31-2010, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by painthorse View Post
You need to find a new farrier, I pay $25 for a trim and no barn fee, I don't know about shoes because I don't shoe my horses. I would definitly be looking around for a new 1 and before I hired one I would make sure of their fee's.
When I hired my farrier 12 years ago I was paying half the fees. You have to remember that farriers are (typically) self-employed businesspeople. And like all self employed businesspeople, they must adapt and change with the growing economy. You don't get a coke for $0.10 a bottle nowadays, but you did back in the old days!

OP, I would say your farrier is recouping his costs on the changing economy - I'd personally be happy that he's not charging mileage, as that can add up, or fees for other work he does that he could probably tack on.
If he's great at his job and you're happy, leave him be. If you switch, he might "take it in the nose", as my mother would say, and if your new farrier was crummy your old one might not come back.

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post #18 of 19 Old 03-31-2010, 10:26 PM
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Originally Posted by My2Geldings View Post
It's unfortunate gas went up, but what does it have to do with horses?? it's part of the business he's in. It's something he should be covering, not you.
I don't agree with that. If you're job is driving from client to client and gas prices go up and you don't also raise your prices then eventually you're not makng any money at all. - I have a job that requires driving back and forth to many clients and if I don't raise my rates as gas prices go up then I'm out of an income! My only other option is to quit and find a new job. Which would put you in a pickle.

however, a $10 fee seems kind of high.


But to answer the question. I pay $35 for a natural "barefoot" trim.
I don't do shoes.
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post #19 of 19 Old 03-31-2010, 10:37 PM
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My farrier was out today. No clue what the separate charges are but he charges me $99 for trims on 2 horses and 1 set of front shoes and he has an hour trip one way.

He does an awesome job and calls if he's running late. Even spent a good amount of time teaching me various things. Today he worked with me on picking up her feet.... she happily picks them up for everyone BUT me!
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